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Never tried to make one but seen a few finished ones with a top like that that seemed pretty nice, makes it easy to set height, change bits, and swap out the router motor.
 

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I made this one probally 5 years ago, has worked real well for me, heck it sat in the weather under a tarp for over 6 months after hurricane Charley took the roof off my old workshop. Im gonna start a new router table hopefully this weekend and still thinking about if I want to hinge it again, its so handy or get a router with height adjustment built in. it makes ya think a little more about how to build your fence though, like take the fence off or have it move with the top. old router table
 

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i also havent made one, but i really like the idea of it. if i every make a new router table i think it will be one like this.

i'm not sure why randy mentions the fence… i mean, the fence would be locked down anyway, so why should it matter if it the table top moves or not? maybe i just havent seen enough router table fence designs :)
 

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Are legs measuring 4" X 4" really necessary? What are they supporting, 20 pounds, maybe? Plywood or MDF casework makes more sense to me than this crazy post-and-beam design, unless you're coordinating your router table joinery with your shaker barn workshop, maybe. Randy's design is much more practical.
 

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Aaron, my first one , only the front 3/4 or so raised up and that ment I had to take the fence off to tilt it, as the fence locked down on the un hinged part ,tilting the entire top cured that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Poopiecat,

You bring up some good points. Plywood or MDF casework would be practical and offer better storage.

4×4 legs are not necessary, but adding weight to the base of the table offers better machine dynamics (less vibration). Using the 3/8" rod to join the members in the base ensures that the base will be rigid regardless of seasonal movement.

Also, as you alluded to, I wanted to match my workbench.

I guess there is only one way to see if the post and beam is worth anything. I built the base this weekend, and will mount the router shortly.
 
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