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Stanley produced a very short-lived frog design during the early 1870's (pictured in the image to the left). This design has a frog that is about 1/2 the length of the normal frog, and is nearly identical to the design that Leonard Bailey was producing when he got pissed off at Stanley and decided to come up with a new line of bench planes, his Victor line. Stanley, realizing the genius of Leonard Bailey, may have thought that his new design would prove to be a threat to the conventional design and then decided to mimic his. Bailey's Victor design certainly proved easier to manufacture as there was less machining involved, but it does have two real flaws: there is no ability to adjust the frog to open or close the mouth; and the cross-rib that carries the frog is susceptible to cracking or breaking due to the stress placed on it from overtightening the lever cap or during planing. This frog is secured to the cross-rib via two screws that are oriented horizontally. Nice attempt Leonard and Stanley, especially since one size frog could be used on multiple sizes of the bench planes (#3 through #8), but the one frog fits all definitely didn't satisfy all users of the planes.

Many folks find it confusing about whether Stanley or Bailey made these planes. The answer is, both made them. Leonard Bailey, while working in happening Boston, Massachusetts during the 1850's and 1860's, came upon the fundamental design of planes with which we are all familiar. These planes have very little in the way of markings, except on the brass nut where sometimes "BAILEY" and "BOSTON" are stamped. Stanley, having been a manufacturer of rules, levels, squares, etc for some 15 years, was looking to expand their toolmaking business, so they bought out Bailey's patents in 1869. They produced the planes with little change, where the only Stanley markings were on the iron and on the lateral adjustment lever. In 1902, as homage to Bailey, Stanley started making their castings with "BAILEY" embossed in them - these planes were made by Stanley, and Stanley alone. In 1925, lever caps were first offered with "STANLEY" embossed in them, while the bottom castings were still being made with "BAILEY" cast into them. Many people believe that the lever caps are replaced on these models or that they aren't Stanley products since they have "BAILEY" on them. They most assuredly are Stanley products. The Bailey-made stuff, from Boston, is very scarce and highly prized by collectors.
 

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I agree with Wayne, there's no sign of being Stanley Bailey as far as I know, even though that big flat knob seems familiar with me, I think I saw it before I just can't remember where….still looking
 

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I am certainly NOT going to touch this plane with anything…thanks for the advice.

Jim Crammond from sawmill creek says: That plane is known as a Chaplin's patent and was manufactured by Tower and Lyon. I think they were produced from about 1875 to the early 1900s. There were several different models produced over those years.

I believe it is a Chaplin's original patent #203 Smoothing seen here.

Type 3, (Oct 1887 Tower and Lyon advert "Carpentry and Building"), Smooth base and corrugated base (corrugations on the top of the base), i.e. the 12** series. Adjustable throat option on some planes, frog plate now hollowed out shape to reduce friction on the blade, and the lever cap also shaped on the back with a central rib. Optional iron or wooden handle. Tower and Lyon on blades. On the block planes the adjustment paddle is teardrop shape, and the knob has fine knurling.

Here is some history on Chaplin.

After closer inspection;
on the blade is says: Tower and Lyon; New York; 772 july 4

Where do collectors go to purchase these old planes? I can't believe this plane is from the 19c.

Thanks for the help guys. I find these old planes fascinating!!!
 

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Being on this site you learn so much:) Thanks for the chat about the planes. I thought I had seen most planes out there but as they say you always will learn something new each day. Very interesting plane and with metal handles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
This one has wooden hand holds but the only ones I have found online have either metal or plastic. I'm guessing this might make it more valuable. Here is a link to an auction of hand top dollar hand planes. The Chaplin shown here brought 28.6K! It is a #1/2 which mine is a #3 or #4…still holding my breath:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Here is response received from Peter McBride:

"Hello Scotty,
Your plane is a #3 size.
The front knob, although it looks old, is likely to be an early replacement. It is unlike any I have have ever seen on a Chaplin's patent plane.
The flat top on that knob is particularly clashing with every other nicely shaped part on the plane, it couldn't possibly have been made by the same maker."
 
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