LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,533 Posts
My wife and I like to stroll the banks of the Red River here, where the 38-foot crest is about to visit us. I always like to view the aftermath, and one thing the river yields in abundance is the logs from downed trees.
Of course, being a woodworker I'm always casting an eye on them, wondering which way to slice them for best yield, what species of tree it was, and how am I going to get that into the back of my truck!
But there is also another source of lumber, that I had not known of previously, I saw an article in the local paper about Elm cuttings that the city does not know what to do with. They cut 5,000 to 6,000 mature elms down every year due to Dutch Elm disease! And there's acres of elm cuttings piled high, waiting for processing of some sort or another. In the process of searching for a pic of that woodpile I found an interesting link: http://www.treewise.ca/ded.htm
Has anyone successfully scavenged and milled downed timbers that have floated to shore? I mean, is it worthwhile, or should I give up on the notion of reclaiming found wood?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,533 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, Union! (PSAC here)...yes I know about that old-growth softwood they're pulling out of the Great Lakes, beautiful, tight-grained stuff it is! For me, it's mostly about discovering all the unknown species of wood just waiting to be found. Hmmm, I wonder if I'd get in trouble for bringing my chainsaw into a riverside park… and slicing away?
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top