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Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
I'll give you my unsolicited thoughts. I too used this process in a very similar manner. The only difference is that I was told the copper wire should not touch the water. I don't know why or if that is even really required, but I think that it has something to do with the possibility of creating a toxic byproduct. I really don't know.

Anyway, I did notice one thing. It seemed that after a quick bath, it loosens up the rust significantly. A quick scrub with a brass brush takes a lot of rust off fast and then you just rinse it in water and put it back in a again. In theory, it shoudl get rid of ALL the rust. evaporust is good, but so is electrolysis and it should be able to get every last bit off. Great photos. You've got a real beauty there.
 

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Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
those are some real nice knobs/totes Andy… real nice stuff
 

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1,362 Posts
Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
I tried this method for the first time this week also. My set-up looks almost identical to yours except I used on 3 rebar rods. One thing that is mentioned in several blogs, once the items are removed from the solution and rinsed off, they rust immediately (within seconds). Get oil on them right away.
 

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Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
Back to the handles. I think they can be glued with PVA and refinished. I would start there. Some photos from my blog of gluing up a handle.

http://lumberjocks.com/WayneC/blog/844

Another option is to check the handles on some of your other stanley planes. I would imagine parts planes come into the tool store quite often.
 

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Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
huh - very interesting
 

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Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
I've used a similar electrolosis technique for years on antique car parts. I dug a shallow hole in an unused portion of my yard just deep enough to place the car frame, alxe housings, and misc. parts in with enough room to cover with about two inches of water, lined the hole with two layers of plastic sheeting, placed the parts, filled the hole with water, and added Crystal Vanish Toilet Bowl Cleaner. I only used one scrap iron negative electrode which did not touch any of the parts, and another scrap iron electrode which touched all the parts ( all the parts should touch each other). A 6 volt trickle charger supplied just enough current that stimulated the removal of the rust (in three days I had white metal on all the eighty some year old parts). Afterward I let the solution evaporate, roll up the plastic, and dispose of it in the trash.

This system also works with a few small parts in a small plastic container without the electrical charge, but it takes considerably longer. Like several of you have mentioned, if there is any appreciable moisture in the air, the newly unprotected parts will flash rust. I like the WD-40 (Water Displacer version 40) idea on unpainted parts. I blow dry the parts with compressed air and immediately spray them with metal primer. I live in a desert, and have only done this during summer (about 9 months of the year) so have had little flash rusting problem.
 

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Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
That's cool!!!!!!! You might try 220 or higher sand paper on that as well for the sole. I just cleaned one up yesterday. Put a half sheet on a peice of melamine and go back and forth with the sides and the bottom. It will get rid of all the other digs you have on the plane and it digs out the pittings.

I wonder if your process would work on a 1993 Toyota Tercel? I mean it would probably fit in the bucket anyway.
 

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Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
Electrolysis has worked great for my old logging tools.

Todd, try this for your '93 Toyota
http://antique-engines.com/trailer-electrolysis.htm
 

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Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
Looking at the LN youtube site I notice they had a setup demo for low angle jack planes. Think you would find it of interest.

Part one - Setup

Part two - versatility
 

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1,487 Posts
Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
blake i'll tell u homever let that 62 go was crazy i tried to get one like it myself but didn't have money at the time so i missed out but u got lucky i see.
 

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9,509 Posts
Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
Here is some info on repairing handles

https://home.comcast.net/~rexmill/planes101/handle_repair/handle.htm
 

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Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
This was great! I did not know anything about this process.
 

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6,114 Posts
Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
So how are the status?
Are you up and running?
Best thoughts,
MaFe
 

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Discussion Starter · #134 ·
Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
Yes, it worked great. Go to the next blog in the series, part 9. (Link at top of page.)
 

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Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
thank you for this post - electrolysis is my new favorite thing!

c8d6b2d0, Uploaded from the Photobucket iPhone App
 

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Discussion Starter · #136 ·
Stanley No. 62 Restored, Bench Finished!

Stanley No. 62

After putting the Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane through electrolysis still had quite a bit of work to do. Here is a "before photo" as a reminder:

P1010005

In my last post WayneC commented:
I would seal the japanned area using a clear schallac. This will prevent further rust. 3 in 1 oil on the adjustment screw. On the knobs they look repairable to me. Glue and refinish. Given the value of this plane, I would keep the original knobs. I would use a good paste wax on the rest of the metal parts.

Well thats exactly what I did (Thanks Wayne). The Shellac looked great on the old Japanning. Even though it wasn't all there it re-emphasized whats left of it.

And I did decide to repair and refinish the tote and knob and they came out great. The tote was broken in two places (three pieces). So I drilled three holes up through it and drove 2 1/2" finish nails into the holes to reinforce the epoxied joints. Then I stripped the old finish off and applied thee coats of Shellac.

Anyway, here is the finished result:

DSC_6481

DSC_6482

DSC_6483

Woodworking Bench

I also finished my bench! Sorry, I didn't take any more progress photos toward the end. But since the last blog I basically just drilled the 3/4" dog holes, made vice handles, and finished the top with Danish Oil and Wax. Here is the finished project:



Now its time to put it all together and make some shavings!
 
Joined
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4,013 Posts
Stanley No. 62 Restored, Bench Finished!

Stanley No. 62

After putting the Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane through electrolysis still had quite a bit of work to do. Here is a "before photo" as a reminder:

P1010005

In my last post WayneC commented:
I would seal the japanned area using a clear schallac. This will prevent further rust. 3 in 1 oil on the adjustment screw. On the knobs they look repairable to me. Glue and refinish. Given the value of this plane, I would keep the original knobs. I would use a good paste wax on the rest of the metal parts.

Well thats exactly what I did (Thanks Wayne). The Shellac looked great on the old Japanning. Even though it wasn't all there it re-emphasized whats left of it.

And I did decide to repair and refinish the tote and knob and they came out great. The tote was broken in two places (three pieces). So I drilled three holes up through it and drove 2 1/2" finish nails into the holes to reinforce the epoxied joints. Then I stripped the old finish off and applied thee coats of Shellac.

Anyway, here is the finished result:

DSC_6481

DSC_6482

DSC_6483

Woodworking Bench

I also finished my bench! Sorry, I didn't take any more progress photos toward the end. But since the last blog I basically just drilled the 3/4" dog holes, made vice handles, and finished the top with Danish Oil and Wax. Here is the finished project:



Now its time to put it all together and make some shavings!
Great job,Blake!
 

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Registered
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462 Posts
Stanley No. 62 Restored, Bench Finished!

Stanley No. 62

After putting the Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane through electrolysis still had quite a bit of work to do. Here is a "before photo" as a reminder:

P1010005

In my last post WayneC commented:
I would seal the japanned area using a clear schallac. This will prevent further rust. 3 in 1 oil on the adjustment screw. On the knobs they look repairable to me. Glue and refinish. Given the value of this plane, I would keep the original knobs. I would use a good paste wax on the rest of the metal parts.

Well thats exactly what I did (Thanks Wayne). The Shellac looked great on the old Japanning. Even though it wasn't all there it re-emphasized whats left of it.

And I did decide to repair and refinish the tote and knob and they came out great. The tote was broken in two places (three pieces). So I drilled three holes up through it and drove 2 1/2" finish nails into the holes to reinforce the epoxied joints. Then I stripped the old finish off and applied thee coats of Shellac.

Anyway, here is the finished result:

DSC_6481

DSC_6482

DSC_6483

Woodworking Bench

I also finished my bench! Sorry, I didn't take any more progress photos toward the end. But since the last blog I basically just drilled the 3/4" dog holes, made vice handles, and finished the top with Danish Oil and Wax. Here is the finished project:



Now its time to put it all together and make some shavings!
Unbelievable transformation! Thats a real worker now. Have you tuned it up yet to get to work or only cosmetic so far? I guess we need the obligatory shavings photo.

Nice bench too.
 

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Registered
Joined
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1,466 Posts
Discussion Starter · #139 ·
Stanley No. 62 Restored, Bench Finished!

Stanley No. 62

After putting the Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane through electrolysis still had quite a bit of work to do. Here is a "before photo" as a reminder:

P1010005

In my last post WayneC commented:
I would seal the japanned area using a clear schallac. This will prevent further rust. 3 in 1 oil on the adjustment screw. On the knobs they look repairable to me. Glue and refinish. Given the value of this plane, I would keep the original knobs. I would use a good paste wax on the rest of the metal parts.

Well thats exactly what I did (Thanks Wayne). The Shellac looked great on the old Japanning. Even though it wasn't all there it re-emphasized whats left of it.

And I did decide to repair and refinish the tote and knob and they came out great. The tote was broken in two places (three pieces). So I drilled three holes up through it and drove 2 1/2" finish nails into the holes to reinforce the epoxied joints. Then I stripped the old finish off and applied thee coats of Shellac.

Anyway, here is the finished result:

DSC_6481

DSC_6482

DSC_6483

Woodworking Bench

I also finished my bench! Sorry, I didn't take any more progress photos toward the end. But since the last blog I basically just drilled the 3/4" dog holes, made vice handles, and finished the top with Danish Oil and Wax. Here is the finished project:



Now its time to put it all together and make some shavings!
I still need to sharpen it. Guess I forgot to mention that. I'll get you that shavings photo.
 

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Registered
Joined
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9,509 Posts
Stanley No. 62 Restored, Bench Finished!

Stanley No. 62

After putting the Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane through electrolysis still had quite a bit of work to do. Here is a "before photo" as a reminder:

P1010005

In my last post WayneC commented:
I would seal the japanned area using a clear schallac. This will prevent further rust. 3 in 1 oil on the adjustment screw. On the knobs they look repairable to me. Glue and refinish. Given the value of this plane, I would keep the original knobs. I would use a good paste wax on the rest of the metal parts.

Well thats exactly what I did (Thanks Wayne). The Shellac looked great on the old Japanning. Even though it wasn't all there it re-emphasized whats left of it.

And I did decide to repair and refinish the tote and knob and they came out great. The tote was broken in two places (three pieces). So I drilled three holes up through it and drove 2 1/2" finish nails into the holes to reinforce the epoxied joints. Then I stripped the old finish off and applied thee coats of Shellac.

Anyway, here is the finished result:

DSC_6481

DSC_6482

DSC_6483

Woodworking Bench

I also finished my bench! Sorry, I didn't take any more progress photos toward the end. But since the last blog I basically just drilled the 3/4" dog holes, made vice handles, and finished the top with Danish Oil and Wax. Here is the finished project:



Now its time to put it all together and make some shavings!
Well done Blake. Looking forward to getting your impression as to how well it works in your shooting board.
 
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