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Bench Almost Complete

More bench progress…

Here is the "tail" vice mortised into the end of the bench. You can also see how the underside of the bench looks with all the different widths I used:

P1010011

Clamping on the wider "apron" pieces front and back:

P1010006

And adding the end aprons with dowels:

P1010007

P1010008

P1010009

P1010010

As you can see I painted the 4×6 fir base black:

P1010030

I leveled the table with shims under the feet and then bolted the legs to the floor:



And then the fun part began…

P1010012

P1010014

I routed the edges of my vice jaws on the router table:

P1010018

P1010020

The vices came out really nicely. I made the tail vice so it would span across the entire width of the bench. That way I could have bench dogs along both edges of the bench for wide clamping.

P1010021

P1010023

Nearly complete… now all I have to do is add the dog holes, and a little sanding/finishing. I actually made it to the Sacramento Woodworking Show on Sunday and picked up some brass Veritas bench dogs.

P1010027

I think it looks really good with the black base.

P1010025

(See all the shavings on the floor!)

UPDATE:

Here are the links to the finished bench and cabinet in my projects:

Very good job,good looking work bench.
 

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1,466 Posts
Discussion Starter · #102 ·
Bench Almost Complete

More bench progress…

Here is the "tail" vice mortised into the end of the bench. You can also see how the underside of the bench looks with all the different widths I used:

P1010011

Clamping on the wider "apron" pieces front and back:

P1010006

And adding the end aprons with dowels:

P1010007

P1010008

P1010009

P1010010

As you can see I painted the 4×6 fir base black:

P1010030

I leveled the table with shims under the feet and then bolted the legs to the floor:



And then the fun part began…

P1010012

P1010014

I routed the edges of my vice jaws on the router table:

P1010018

P1010020

The vices came out really nicely. I made the tail vice so it would span across the entire width of the bench. That way I could have bench dogs along both edges of the bench for wide clamping.

P1010021

P1010023

Nearly complete… now all I have to do is add the dog holes, and a little sanding/finishing. I actually made it to the Sacramento Woodworking Show on Sunday and picked up some brass Veritas bench dogs.

P1010027

I think it looks really good with the black base.

P1010025

(See all the shavings on the floor!)

UPDATE:

Here are the links to the finished bench and cabinet in my projects:

Thanks for the handle idea, Todd.
 

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Registered
Joined
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691 Posts
Bench Almost Complete

More bench progress…

Here is the "tail" vice mortised into the end of the bench. You can also see how the underside of the bench looks with all the different widths I used:

P1010011

Clamping on the wider "apron" pieces front and back:

P1010006

And adding the end aprons with dowels:

P1010007

P1010008

P1010009

P1010010

As you can see I painted the 4×6 fir base black:

P1010030

I leveled the table with shims under the feet and then bolted the legs to the floor:



And then the fun part began…

P1010012

P1010014

I routed the edges of my vice jaws on the router table:

P1010018

P1010020

The vices came out really nicely. I made the tail vice so it would span across the entire width of the bench. That way I could have bench dogs along both edges of the bench for wide clamping.

P1010021

P1010023

Nearly complete… now all I have to do is add the dog holes, and a little sanding/finishing. I actually made it to the Sacramento Woodworking Show on Sunday and picked up some brass Veritas bench dogs.

P1010027

I think it looks really good with the black base.

P1010025

(See all the shavings on the floor!)

UPDATE:

Here are the links to the finished bench and cabinet in my projects:

Nice looking bench Blake.
 

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Registered
Joined
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166 Posts
Bench Almost Complete

More bench progress…

Here is the "tail" vice mortised into the end of the bench. You can also see how the underside of the bench looks with all the different widths I used:

P1010011

Clamping on the wider "apron" pieces front and back:

P1010006

And adding the end aprons with dowels:

P1010007

P1010008

P1010009

P1010010

As you can see I painted the 4×6 fir base black:

P1010030

I leveled the table with shims under the feet and then bolted the legs to the floor:



And then the fun part began…

P1010012

P1010014

I routed the edges of my vice jaws on the router table:

P1010018

P1010020

The vices came out really nicely. I made the tail vice so it would span across the entire width of the bench. That way I could have bench dogs along both edges of the bench for wide clamping.

P1010021

P1010023

Nearly complete… now all I have to do is add the dog holes, and a little sanding/finishing. I actually made it to the Sacramento Woodworking Show on Sunday and picked up some brass Veritas bench dogs.

P1010027

I think it looks really good with the black base.

P1010025

(See all the shavings on the floor!)

UPDATE:

Here are the links to the finished bench and cabinet in my projects:

Looks really good, nice color on the base. How thick is the top, square or round holes?
 

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Registered
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1,466 Posts
Discussion Starter · #105 ·
Bench Almost Complete

More bench progress…

Here is the "tail" vice mortised into the end of the bench. You can also see how the underside of the bench looks with all the different widths I used:

P1010011

Clamping on the wider "apron" pieces front and back:

P1010006

And adding the end aprons with dowels:

P1010007

P1010008

P1010009

P1010010

As you can see I painted the 4×6 fir base black:

P1010030

I leveled the table with shims under the feet and then bolted the legs to the floor:



And then the fun part began…

P1010012

P1010014

I routed the edges of my vice jaws on the router table:

P1010018

P1010020

The vices came out really nicely. I made the tail vice so it would span across the entire width of the bench. That way I could have bench dogs along both edges of the bench for wide clamping.

P1010021

P1010023

Nearly complete… now all I have to do is add the dog holes, and a little sanding/finishing. I actually made it to the Sacramento Woodworking Show on Sunday and picked up some brass Veritas bench dogs.

P1010027

I think it looks really good with the black base.

P1010025

(See all the shavings on the floor!)

UPDATE:

Here are the links to the finished bench and cabinet in my projects:

Round holes. The top is over 2.5" thick.
 

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Registered
Joined
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5,163 Posts
Bench Almost Complete

More bench progress…

Here is the "tail" vice mortised into the end of the bench. You can also see how the underside of the bench looks with all the different widths I used:

P1010011

Clamping on the wider "apron" pieces front and back:

P1010006

And adding the end aprons with dowels:

P1010007

P1010008

P1010009

P1010010

As you can see I painted the 4×6 fir base black:

P1010030

I leveled the table with shims under the feet and then bolted the legs to the floor:



And then the fun part began…

P1010012

P1010014

I routed the edges of my vice jaws on the router table:

P1010018

P1010020

The vices came out really nicely. I made the tail vice so it would span across the entire width of the bench. That way I could have bench dogs along both edges of the bench for wide clamping.

P1010021

P1010023

Nearly complete… now all I have to do is add the dog holes, and a little sanding/finishing. I actually made it to the Sacramento Woodworking Show on Sunday and picked up some brass Veritas bench dogs.

P1010027

I think it looks really good with the black base.

P1010025

(See all the shavings on the floor!)

UPDATE:

Here are the links to the finished bench and cabinet in my projects:

Blake, this turned out to be a great looking bench. This is going to be a nice addition to your shop.
 

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Joined
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9 Posts
Bench Almost Complete

More bench progress…

Here is the "tail" vice mortised into the end of the bench. You can also see how the underside of the bench looks with all the different widths I used:

P1010011

Clamping on the wider "apron" pieces front and back:

P1010006

And adding the end aprons with dowels:

P1010007

P1010008

P1010009

P1010010

As you can see I painted the 4×6 fir base black:

P1010030

I leveled the table with shims under the feet and then bolted the legs to the floor:



And then the fun part began…

P1010012

P1010014

I routed the edges of my vice jaws on the router table:

P1010018

P1010020

The vices came out really nicely. I made the tail vice so it would span across the entire width of the bench. That way I could have bench dogs along both edges of the bench for wide clamping.

P1010021

P1010023

Nearly complete… now all I have to do is add the dog holes, and a little sanding/finishing. I actually made it to the Sacramento Woodworking Show on Sunday and picked up some brass Veritas bench dogs.

P1010027

I think it looks really good with the black base.

P1010025

(See all the shavings on the floor!)

UPDATE:

Here are the links to the finished bench and cabinet in my projects:

Great looking bench blake…the black stand makes the benchtop really stand out. Now you have more of a reason to use hand tools!
 

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Registered
Joined
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380 Posts
Bench Almost Complete

More bench progress…

Here is the "tail" vice mortised into the end of the bench. You can also see how the underside of the bench looks with all the different widths I used:

P1010011

Clamping on the wider "apron" pieces front and back:

P1010006

And adding the end aprons with dowels:

P1010007

P1010008

P1010009

P1010010

As you can see I painted the 4×6 fir base black:

P1010030

I leveled the table with shims under the feet and then bolted the legs to the floor:



And then the fun part began…

P1010012

P1010014

I routed the edges of my vice jaws on the router table:

P1010018

P1010020

The vices came out really nicely. I made the tail vice so it would span across the entire width of the bench. That way I could have bench dogs along both edges of the bench for wide clamping.

P1010021

P1010023

Nearly complete… now all I have to do is add the dog holes, and a little sanding/finishing. I actually made it to the Sacramento Woodworking Show on Sunday and picked up some brass Veritas bench dogs.

P1010027

I think it looks really good with the black base.

P1010025

(See all the shavings on the floor!)

UPDATE:

Here are the links to the finished bench and cabinet in my projects:

What a great little bench, bubba. Very nicely conceived and done. Bravo.

always,
J.C.
 

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Registered
Joined
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2,185 Posts
Bench Almost Complete

More bench progress…

Here is the "tail" vice mortised into the end of the bench. You can also see how the underside of the bench looks with all the different widths I used:

P1010011

Clamping on the wider "apron" pieces front and back:

P1010006

And adding the end aprons with dowels:

P1010007

P1010008

P1010009

P1010010

As you can see I painted the 4×6 fir base black:

P1010030

I leveled the table with shims under the feet and then bolted the legs to the floor:



And then the fun part began…

P1010012

P1010014

I routed the edges of my vice jaws on the router table:

P1010018

P1010020

The vices came out really nicely. I made the tail vice so it would span across the entire width of the bench. That way I could have bench dogs along both edges of the bench for wide clamping.

P1010021

P1010023

Nearly complete… now all I have to do is add the dog holes, and a little sanding/finishing. I actually made it to the Sacramento Woodworking Show on Sunday and picked up some brass Veritas bench dogs.

P1010027

I think it looks really good with the black base.

P1010025

(See all the shavings on the floor!)

UPDATE:

Here are the links to the finished bench and cabinet in my projects:

Very nice Blake. I'm jealous.

It will be interesting to see if your endcaps cause any problems with wood movement. Usually these are applied with a sliding attachment and only glued at the end. But you seem to have a well placed horseshoe, so it will probably be just fine.

The thumbnail edging on the vice chocks are sweet.

Good job,
Steve
 

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Registered
Joined
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9,309 Posts
Bench Almost Complete

More bench progress…

Here is the "tail" vice mortised into the end of the bench. You can also see how the underside of the bench looks with all the different widths I used:

P1010011

Clamping on the wider "apron" pieces front and back:

P1010006

And adding the end aprons with dowels:

P1010007

P1010008

P1010009

P1010010

As you can see I painted the 4×6 fir base black:

P1010030

I leveled the table with shims under the feet and then bolted the legs to the floor:



And then the fun part began…

P1010012

P1010014

I routed the edges of my vice jaws on the router table:

P1010018

P1010020

The vices came out really nicely. I made the tail vice so it would span across the entire width of the bench. That way I could have bench dogs along both edges of the bench for wide clamping.

P1010021

P1010023

Nearly complete… now all I have to do is add the dog holes, and a little sanding/finishing. I actually made it to the Sacramento Woodworking Show on Sunday and picked up some brass Veritas bench dogs.

P1010027

I think it looks really good with the black base.

P1010025

(See all the shavings on the floor!)

UPDATE:

Here are the links to the finished bench and cabinet in my projects:

great bench ,
i like the end vise all the way across ,
good idea !
 

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Registered
Joined
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219 Posts
Bench Almost Complete

More bench progress…

Here is the "tail" vice mortised into the end of the bench. You can also see how the underside of the bench looks with all the different widths I used:

P1010011

Clamping on the wider "apron" pieces front and back:

P1010006

And adding the end aprons with dowels:

P1010007

P1010008

P1010009

P1010010

As you can see I painted the 4×6 fir base black:

P1010030

I leveled the table with shims under the feet and then bolted the legs to the floor:



And then the fun part began…

P1010012

P1010014

I routed the edges of my vice jaws on the router table:

P1010018

P1010020

The vices came out really nicely. I made the tail vice so it would span across the entire width of the bench. That way I could have bench dogs along both edges of the bench for wide clamping.

P1010021

P1010023

Nearly complete… now all I have to do is add the dog holes, and a little sanding/finishing. I actually made it to the Sacramento Woodworking Show on Sunday and picked up some brass Veritas bench dogs.

P1010027

I think it looks really good with the black base.

P1010025

(See all the shavings on the floor!)

UPDATE:

Here are the links to the finished bench and cabinet in my projects:

Blake,

This bench is awesome. The black paint on the base was definitely the way to go. Great use of the end vise. As others mentioned really like the edge detail on the vises. This looks to weight a ton.
 

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Registered
Joined
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20 Posts
Bench Almost Complete

More bench progress…

Here is the "tail" vice mortised into the end of the bench. You can also see how the underside of the bench looks with all the different widths I used:

P1010011

Clamping on the wider "apron" pieces front and back:

P1010006

And adding the end aprons with dowels:

P1010007

P1010008

P1010009

P1010010

As you can see I painted the 4×6 fir base black:

P1010030

I leveled the table with shims under the feet and then bolted the legs to the floor:



And then the fun part began…

P1010012

P1010014

I routed the edges of my vice jaws on the router table:

P1010018

P1010020

The vices came out really nicely. I made the tail vice so it would span across the entire width of the bench. That way I could have bench dogs along both edges of the bench for wide clamping.

P1010021

P1010023

Nearly complete… now all I have to do is add the dog holes, and a little sanding/finishing. I actually made it to the Sacramento Woodworking Show on Sunday and picked up some brass Veritas bench dogs.

P1010027

I think it looks really good with the black base.

P1010025

(See all the shavings on the floor!)

UPDATE:

Here are the links to the finished bench and cabinet in my projects:

Blake,

this looks great! nice job.
is there a newer pic you could post. just curious what you came up with for dog placement.
all the best-
Tom
 

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1,466 Posts
Discussion Starter · #113 ·
Bench Almost Complete

More bench progress…

Here is the "tail" vice mortised into the end of the bench. You can also see how the underside of the bench looks with all the different widths I used:

P1010011

Clamping on the wider "apron" pieces front and back:

P1010006

And adding the end aprons with dowels:

P1010007

P1010008

P1010009

P1010010

As you can see I painted the 4×6 fir base black:

P1010030

I leveled the table with shims under the feet and then bolted the legs to the floor:



And then the fun part began…

P1010012

P1010014

I routed the edges of my vice jaws on the router table:

P1010018

P1010020

The vices came out really nicely. I made the tail vice so it would span across the entire width of the bench. That way I could have bench dogs along both edges of the bench for wide clamping.

P1010021

P1010023

Nearly complete… now all I have to do is add the dog holes, and a little sanding/finishing. I actually made it to the Sacramento Woodworking Show on Sunday and picked up some brass Veritas bench dogs.

P1010027

I think it looks really good with the black base.

P1010025

(See all the shavings on the floor!)

UPDATE:

Here are the links to the finished bench and cabinet in my projects:

I just updated my post (above) to include links to the finished bench and cabinet. Here they are again:

 

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Registered
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1,466 Posts
Discussion Starter · #114 ·
Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
 

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Registered
Joined
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1,243 Posts
Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
Hi Blake

Nice job can i ask is the body pitted in any way as i see there are still some rust spots there and on the sole as for the tote and knob are you looking for original used or brand new if that makes sence LOL…....
 

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6,838 Posts
Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
nice job. looks like there still some rust leftover on the body - better clean that off using evap-o-rust or something else, otherwise it'll spread around.

the tote does not need to be turned - you could use your bandsaw to cut it like I did here
 

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3,227 Posts
Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
Like Purlev said, Evaporust. It removes all the rust. All of it. The best stuff I've ever seen. Your electrolysis system is pretty cool though.
 

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Registered
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9,509 Posts
Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
I would seal the japanned area using a clear schallac. This will prevent further rust. 3 in 1 oil on the adjustment screw. On the knobs they look repairable to me. Glue and refinish. Given the value of this plane, I would keep the original knobs. I would use a good paste wax on the rest of the metal parts.

Check the bottom to see if it is flat. It may not need to be lapped…...

Feel free to give me a call.
 

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Registered
Joined
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1,243 Posts
Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
http://www.drozsoldetymestanleytotesandknobs.com try these guys Blake
 

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Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
Blake great job on the clean-up.
 
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