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Discussion Starter · #81 ·
More Bench Progress

Once I had my two larger bench sections glued up I ran them through the planer…



And chopped the ends square



I used my biscuit jointer to align the two laminated "slabs," since after this glue up it will be too big to run through my thickness planer:





Two slabs glued up:



And now glued up with the tool tray:



THE BASE

I spent $18.00 on 4×6 and 2×6 Doug Fir for the base at Home Depot:



A little shaping of the feet on the bandsaw, and oak pads added:



Mortise cut on the RAS (I do it this way because it is fast)



Leg assembly:



The assembled base (screws and glue… but the screws are well hidden)



A little preview of the whole thing together with the huge old Craftsman vice from the flea market:



By the way, the base alone is MASSIVE. It will weigh a ton with the solid oak top sitting on it.

The top will still get wide edges that wrap around all four sides. This will give the sides more surface area as well as make the top look more substantial (the base won't look so disproportionately huge.)

I haven't decided whether to stain or paint the base (maybe black?)... or leave it natural. I think something darker would look nice and de-emphasize the fact that I used construction-grade lumber.

Any thoughts?

Also, what kind of finish do I use on the oak top? Just oil?
Thanks, man.
 

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Discussion Starter · #82 ·
Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack

Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane

Some of the modern high end hand tool manufacturers have been marketing "low angle jack planes" for years now like it is something nobody has ever thought of before. I mean, I had never heard of a low angle jack before I started reading reviews on Lie Nielson and Veritas versions in Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Veritas Low Angle Jack Plane:



And of course we all know that Stanley, the most famous maker of quality hand tools has SERIOUSLY BLOWN IT in the last several decades by manufacturing nothing but crap and letting other companies pick up where they left off. It took them long enough to realize what they had missed out on, and in 2009 they finally released a line of hand planes to compete with Lie Nielson and Veritas (among others)... the nostalgically-named "Sweetheart" line.

2009 Stanley No. 62 "Sweetheart" Low Angle Jack Plane:



Well I found out about a great website called The Best Things from another LJ post (sorry, I forget who). When I was browsing this website I saw a beautiful vintage Stanley plane that I had never hear of before. The Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane.



When I saw this picture I couldn't help getting excited. What a cool plane. I mean, a low angle jack is just kind of a sexy (not to mention useful) addition to a collection of hand planes. And realizing that the original VINTAGE thing was out there, and that they were somewhat RARE… I just had to have one.

Here's where working in a used tool store comes in handy… this came in to our shop the next day:

P1010006 1

P1010005

P1010007 1

P1010008 1

Now I know it know it will be a lot of work… tons of rust and a broken tote… but I think this will be a FUN project.

Now if you don't know about Patrick's Blood and Gore, its the best resource on the internet for information about Stanley planes. Anyway, according to Patrick, the Stanley No. 62 is "one of Stanley's better planes they ever decided to manufacture."

He also notes that "the mouth often chips, especially in the area behind the cutter. You can flip over ten of these plane, and eight of them will be chipped, one will not be chipped but repaired, and the last perfect."

Well, besides the rust and cracked wood, this thing is COMPLETE and PERFECT. No chips or breaks (so I guess it's number ten.)

I've always wanted to try one of those "electrolysis bath" things that I've seen other people do on the internet. I think this would be the perfect candidate. I will also need to make a new tote and knob. I'll keep you posted on the process and I'm sure I'll have questions along the way.
 

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1,162 Posts
Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack

Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane

Some of the modern high end hand tool manufacturers have been marketing "low angle jack planes" for years now like it is something nobody has ever thought of before. I mean, I had never heard of a low angle jack before I started reading reviews on Lie Nielson and Veritas versions in Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Veritas Low Angle Jack Plane:



And of course we all know that Stanley, the most famous maker of quality hand tools has SERIOUSLY BLOWN IT in the last several decades by manufacturing nothing but crap and letting other companies pick up where they left off. It took them long enough to realize what they had missed out on, and in 2009 they finally released a line of hand planes to compete with Lie Nielson and Veritas (among others)... the nostalgically-named "Sweetheart" line.

2009 Stanley No. 62 "Sweetheart" Low Angle Jack Plane:



Well I found out about a great website called The Best Things from another LJ post (sorry, I forget who). When I was browsing this website I saw a beautiful vintage Stanley plane that I had never hear of before. The Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane.



When I saw this picture I couldn't help getting excited. What a cool plane. I mean, a low angle jack is just kind of a sexy (not to mention useful) addition to a collection of hand planes. And realizing that the original VINTAGE thing was out there, and that they were somewhat RARE… I just had to have one.

Here's where working in a used tool store comes in handy… this came in to our shop the next day:

P1010006 1

P1010005

P1010007 1

P1010008 1

Now I know it know it will be a lot of work… tons of rust and a broken tote… but I think this will be a FUN project.

Now if you don't know about Patrick's Blood and Gore, its the best resource on the internet for information about Stanley planes. Anyway, according to Patrick, the Stanley No. 62 is "one of Stanley's better planes they ever decided to manufacture."

He also notes that "the mouth often chips, especially in the area behind the cutter. You can flip over ten of these plane, and eight of them will be chipped, one will not be chipped but repaired, and the last perfect."

Well, besides the rust and cracked wood, this thing is COMPLETE and PERFECT. No chips or breaks (so I guess it's number ten.)

I've always wanted to try one of those "electrolysis bath" things that I've seen other people do on the internet. I think this would be the perfect candidate. I will also need to make a new tote and knob. I'll keep you posted on the process and I'm sure I'll have questions along the way.
Hi Blake,

Congrats on the find. Have you heard of Evapo-Rust? It is unbelievable. You just dip your parts for a while in the solution and all of the rust disappears. You can find it in larger quantities at Fastenal stores and also some auto parts stores. Have fun on the restoration and please post pictures. John
 

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Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack

Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane

Some of the modern high end hand tool manufacturers have been marketing "low angle jack planes" for years now like it is something nobody has ever thought of before. I mean, I had never heard of a low angle jack before I started reading reviews on Lie Nielson and Veritas versions in Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Veritas Low Angle Jack Plane:



And of course we all know that Stanley, the most famous maker of quality hand tools has SERIOUSLY BLOWN IT in the last several decades by manufacturing nothing but crap and letting other companies pick up where they left off. It took them long enough to realize what they had missed out on, and in 2009 they finally released a line of hand planes to compete with Lie Nielson and Veritas (among others)... the nostalgically-named "Sweetheart" line.

2009 Stanley No. 62 "Sweetheart" Low Angle Jack Plane:



Well I found out about a great website called The Best Things from another LJ post (sorry, I forget who). When I was browsing this website I saw a beautiful vintage Stanley plane that I had never hear of before. The Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane.



When I saw this picture I couldn't help getting excited. What a cool plane. I mean, a low angle jack is just kind of a sexy (not to mention useful) addition to a collection of hand planes. And realizing that the original VINTAGE thing was out there, and that they were somewhat RARE… I just had to have one.

Here's where working in a used tool store comes in handy… this came in to our shop the next day:

P1010006 1

P1010005

P1010007 1

P1010008 1

Now I know it know it will be a lot of work… tons of rust and a broken tote… but I think this will be a FUN project.

Now if you don't know about Patrick's Blood and Gore, its the best resource on the internet for information about Stanley planes. Anyway, according to Patrick, the Stanley No. 62 is "one of Stanley's better planes they ever decided to manufacture."

He also notes that "the mouth often chips, especially in the area behind the cutter. You can flip over ten of these plane, and eight of them will be chipped, one will not be chipped but repaired, and the last perfect."

Well, besides the rust and cracked wood, this thing is COMPLETE and PERFECT. No chips or breaks (so I guess it's number ten.)

I've always wanted to try one of those "electrolysis bath" things that I've seen other people do on the internet. I think this would be the perfect candidate. I will also need to make a new tote and knob. I'll keep you posted on the process and I'm sure I'll have questions along the way.
While just about all the vintage Stanley planes are highly sought after and collected, there are some that can cause a frenzy on eBay; this one, the bedrocks, and the real long ones-the bigger, the better!

I would love to get my hands on that old rusted 62. It's a perfect resto candidate.

Your handle's a twin crack, rather than careful glue-up (done that) probably better off to sabotage.

Blake, you furnished the "Before" pics now we look forward to the "After."

After decades of an arsenal of sprays, steel wool, and pink jelly, the discovery of Evapo-Rust-as JO describes above-was a true blessing. It's available at Harbor Freight; it's the same everywhere: $19.95 a gallon, available in quarts.

Woodworker or not, E-R's a staple everyone should have on hand at all times…
A dozen eggs, 5 lbs. of flour, a claw hammer, a bag of peat moss, and Miles' "So What" on the turntable.

Best,
Peter
 

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Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack

Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane

Some of the modern high end hand tool manufacturers have been marketing "low angle jack planes" for years now like it is something nobody has ever thought of before. I mean, I had never heard of a low angle jack before I started reading reviews on Lie Nielson and Veritas versions in Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Veritas Low Angle Jack Plane:



And of course we all know that Stanley, the most famous maker of quality hand tools has SERIOUSLY BLOWN IT in the last several decades by manufacturing nothing but crap and letting other companies pick up where they left off. It took them long enough to realize what they had missed out on, and in 2009 they finally released a line of hand planes to compete with Lie Nielson and Veritas (among others)... the nostalgically-named "Sweetheart" line.

2009 Stanley No. 62 "Sweetheart" Low Angle Jack Plane:



Well I found out about a great website called The Best Things from another LJ post (sorry, I forget who). When I was browsing this website I saw a beautiful vintage Stanley plane that I had never hear of before. The Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane.



When I saw this picture I couldn't help getting excited. What a cool plane. I mean, a low angle jack is just kind of a sexy (not to mention useful) addition to a collection of hand planes. And realizing that the original VINTAGE thing was out there, and that they were somewhat RARE… I just had to have one.

Here's where working in a used tool store comes in handy… this came in to our shop the next day:

P1010006 1

P1010005

P1010007 1

P1010008 1

Now I know it know it will be a lot of work… tons of rust and a broken tote… but I think this will be a FUN project.

Now if you don't know about Patrick's Blood and Gore, its the best resource on the internet for information about Stanley planes. Anyway, according to Patrick, the Stanley No. 62 is "one of Stanley's better planes they ever decided to manufacture."

He also notes that "the mouth often chips, especially in the area behind the cutter. You can flip over ten of these plane, and eight of them will be chipped, one will not be chipped but repaired, and the last perfect."

Well, besides the rust and cracked wood, this thing is COMPLETE and PERFECT. No chips or breaks (so I guess it's number ten.)

I've always wanted to try one of those "electrolysis bath" things that I've seen other people do on the internet. I think this would be the perfect candidate. I will also need to make a new tote and knob. I'll keep you posted on the process and I'm sure I'll have questions along the way.
Blake,
That sure does look like a diamond in the rough. Good luck with your refurbishment project. By the way. I hope you didn't have to spend too much to buy it.
 

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Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack

Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane

Some of the modern high end hand tool manufacturers have been marketing "low angle jack planes" for years now like it is something nobody has ever thought of before. I mean, I had never heard of a low angle jack before I started reading reviews on Lie Nielson and Veritas versions in Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Veritas Low Angle Jack Plane:



And of course we all know that Stanley, the most famous maker of quality hand tools has SERIOUSLY BLOWN IT in the last several decades by manufacturing nothing but crap and letting other companies pick up where they left off. It took them long enough to realize what they had missed out on, and in 2009 they finally released a line of hand planes to compete with Lie Nielson and Veritas (among others)... the nostalgically-named "Sweetheart" line.

2009 Stanley No. 62 "Sweetheart" Low Angle Jack Plane:



Well I found out about a great website called The Best Things from another LJ post (sorry, I forget who). When I was browsing this website I saw a beautiful vintage Stanley plane that I had never hear of before. The Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane.



When I saw this picture I couldn't help getting excited. What a cool plane. I mean, a low angle jack is just kind of a sexy (not to mention useful) addition to a collection of hand planes. And realizing that the original VINTAGE thing was out there, and that they were somewhat RARE… I just had to have one.

Here's where working in a used tool store comes in handy… this came in to our shop the next day:

P1010006 1

P1010005

P1010007 1

P1010008 1

Now I know it know it will be a lot of work… tons of rust and a broken tote… but I think this will be a FUN project.

Now if you don't know about Patrick's Blood and Gore, its the best resource on the internet for information about Stanley planes. Anyway, according to Patrick, the Stanley No. 62 is "one of Stanley's better planes they ever decided to manufacture."

He also notes that "the mouth often chips, especially in the area behind the cutter. You can flip over ten of these plane, and eight of them will be chipped, one will not be chipped but repaired, and the last perfect."

Well, besides the rust and cracked wood, this thing is COMPLETE and PERFECT. No chips or breaks (so I guess it's number ten.)

I've always wanted to try one of those "electrolysis bath" things that I've seen other people do on the internet. I think this would be the perfect candidate. I will also need to make a new tote and knob. I'll keep you posted on the process and I'm sure I'll have questions along the way.
Blake, this looks like a fun project. It is going to be interesting to follow the transformation on this plane.
 
Joined
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4,013 Posts
Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack

Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane

Some of the modern high end hand tool manufacturers have been marketing "low angle jack planes" for years now like it is something nobody has ever thought of before. I mean, I had never heard of a low angle jack before I started reading reviews on Lie Nielson and Veritas versions in Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Veritas Low Angle Jack Plane:



And of course we all know that Stanley, the most famous maker of quality hand tools has SERIOUSLY BLOWN IT in the last several decades by manufacturing nothing but crap and letting other companies pick up where they left off. It took them long enough to realize what they had missed out on, and in 2009 they finally released a line of hand planes to compete with Lie Nielson and Veritas (among others)... the nostalgically-named "Sweetheart" line.

2009 Stanley No. 62 "Sweetheart" Low Angle Jack Plane:



Well I found out about a great website called The Best Things from another LJ post (sorry, I forget who). When I was browsing this website I saw a beautiful vintage Stanley plane that I had never hear of before. The Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane.



When I saw this picture I couldn't help getting excited. What a cool plane. I mean, a low angle jack is just kind of a sexy (not to mention useful) addition to a collection of hand planes. And realizing that the original VINTAGE thing was out there, and that they were somewhat RARE… I just had to have one.

Here's where working in a used tool store comes in handy… this came in to our shop the next day:

P1010006 1

P1010005

P1010007 1

P1010008 1

Now I know it know it will be a lot of work… tons of rust and a broken tote… but I think this will be a FUN project.

Now if you don't know about Patrick's Blood and Gore, its the best resource on the internet for information about Stanley planes. Anyway, according to Patrick, the Stanley No. 62 is "one of Stanley's better planes they ever decided to manufacture."

He also notes that "the mouth often chips, especially in the area behind the cutter. You can flip over ten of these plane, and eight of them will be chipped, one will not be chipped but repaired, and the last perfect."

Well, besides the rust and cracked wood, this thing is COMPLETE and PERFECT. No chips or breaks (so I guess it's number ten.)

I've always wanted to try one of those "electrolysis bath" things that I've seen other people do on the internet. I think this would be the perfect candidate. I will also need to make a new tote and knob. I'll keep you posted on the process and I'm sure I'll have questions along the way.
Great find.
 

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Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack

Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane

Some of the modern high end hand tool manufacturers have been marketing "low angle jack planes" for years now like it is something nobody has ever thought of before. I mean, I had never heard of a low angle jack before I started reading reviews on Lie Nielson and Veritas versions in Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Veritas Low Angle Jack Plane:



And of course we all know that Stanley, the most famous maker of quality hand tools has SERIOUSLY BLOWN IT in the last several decades by manufacturing nothing but crap and letting other companies pick up where they left off. It took them long enough to realize what they had missed out on, and in 2009 they finally released a line of hand planes to compete with Lie Nielson and Veritas (among others)... the nostalgically-named "Sweetheart" line.

2009 Stanley No. 62 "Sweetheart" Low Angle Jack Plane:



Well I found out about a great website called The Best Things from another LJ post (sorry, I forget who). When I was browsing this website I saw a beautiful vintage Stanley plane that I had never hear of before. The Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane.



When I saw this picture I couldn't help getting excited. What a cool plane. I mean, a low angle jack is just kind of a sexy (not to mention useful) addition to a collection of hand planes. And realizing that the original VINTAGE thing was out there, and that they were somewhat RARE… I just had to have one.

Here's where working in a used tool store comes in handy… this came in to our shop the next day:

P1010006 1

P1010005

P1010007 1

P1010008 1

Now I know it know it will be a lot of work… tons of rust and a broken tote… but I think this will be a FUN project.

Now if you don't know about Patrick's Blood and Gore, its the best resource on the internet for information about Stanley planes. Anyway, according to Patrick, the Stanley No. 62 is "one of Stanley's better planes they ever decided to manufacture."

He also notes that "the mouth often chips, especially in the area behind the cutter. You can flip over ten of these plane, and eight of them will be chipped, one will not be chipped but repaired, and the last perfect."

Well, besides the rust and cracked wood, this thing is COMPLETE and PERFECT. No chips or breaks (so I guess it's number ten.)

I've always wanted to try one of those "electrolysis bath" things that I've seen other people do on the internet. I think this would be the perfect candidate. I will also need to make a new tote and knob. I'll keep you posted on the process and I'm sure I'll have questions along the way.
Jed and I just bought the low angle jack plane from Veritas and it is working very well. Good luck on the restoration. Oh, and thanks for the information on the rust removal. We could have used it on an old Fulton we restored.
 

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Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack

Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane

Some of the modern high end hand tool manufacturers have been marketing "low angle jack planes" for years now like it is something nobody has ever thought of before. I mean, I had never heard of a low angle jack before I started reading reviews on Lie Nielson and Veritas versions in Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Veritas Low Angle Jack Plane:



And of course we all know that Stanley, the most famous maker of quality hand tools has SERIOUSLY BLOWN IT in the last several decades by manufacturing nothing but crap and letting other companies pick up where they left off. It took them long enough to realize what they had missed out on, and in 2009 they finally released a line of hand planes to compete with Lie Nielson and Veritas (among others)... the nostalgically-named "Sweetheart" line.

2009 Stanley No. 62 "Sweetheart" Low Angle Jack Plane:



Well I found out about a great website called The Best Things from another LJ post (sorry, I forget who). When I was browsing this website I saw a beautiful vintage Stanley plane that I had never hear of before. The Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane.



When I saw this picture I couldn't help getting excited. What a cool plane. I mean, a low angle jack is just kind of a sexy (not to mention useful) addition to a collection of hand planes. And realizing that the original VINTAGE thing was out there, and that they were somewhat RARE… I just had to have one.

Here's where working in a used tool store comes in handy… this came in to our shop the next day:

P1010006 1

P1010005

P1010007 1

P1010008 1

Now I know it know it will be a lot of work… tons of rust and a broken tote… but I think this will be a FUN project.

Now if you don't know about Patrick's Blood and Gore, its the best resource on the internet for information about Stanley planes. Anyway, according to Patrick, the Stanley No. 62 is "one of Stanley's better planes they ever decided to manufacture."

He also notes that "the mouth often chips, especially in the area behind the cutter. You can flip over ten of these plane, and eight of them will be chipped, one will not be chipped but repaired, and the last perfect."

Well, besides the rust and cracked wood, this thing is COMPLETE and PERFECT. No chips or breaks (so I guess it's number ten.)

I've always wanted to try one of those "electrolysis bath" things that I've seen other people do on the internet. I think this would be the perfect candidate. I will also need to make a new tote and knob. I'll keep you posted on the process and I'm sure I'll have questions along the way.
Once cleaned and tuned it will prove itself a thing of beauty ESPECIALLY on end grain and wild grain. I've opted for another blade ground at a higher "included" angle of 55 degrees.

Bon voyage, mon ami!

always,
J.C.
 

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Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack

Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane

Some of the modern high end hand tool manufacturers have been marketing "low angle jack planes" for years now like it is something nobody has ever thought of before. I mean, I had never heard of a low angle jack before I started reading reviews on Lie Nielson and Veritas versions in Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Veritas Low Angle Jack Plane:



And of course we all know that Stanley, the most famous maker of quality hand tools has SERIOUSLY BLOWN IT in the last several decades by manufacturing nothing but crap and letting other companies pick up where they left off. It took them long enough to realize what they had missed out on, and in 2009 they finally released a line of hand planes to compete with Lie Nielson and Veritas (among others)... the nostalgically-named "Sweetheart" line.

2009 Stanley No. 62 "Sweetheart" Low Angle Jack Plane:



Well I found out about a great website called The Best Things from another LJ post (sorry, I forget who). When I was browsing this website I saw a beautiful vintage Stanley plane that I had never hear of before. The Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane.



When I saw this picture I couldn't help getting excited. What a cool plane. I mean, a low angle jack is just kind of a sexy (not to mention useful) addition to a collection of hand planes. And realizing that the original VINTAGE thing was out there, and that they were somewhat RARE… I just had to have one.

Here's where working in a used tool store comes in handy… this came in to our shop the next day:

P1010006 1

P1010005

P1010007 1

P1010008 1

Now I know it know it will be a lot of work… tons of rust and a broken tote… but I think this will be a FUN project.

Now if you don't know about Patrick's Blood and Gore, its the best resource on the internet for information about Stanley planes. Anyway, according to Patrick, the Stanley No. 62 is "one of Stanley's better planes they ever decided to manufacture."

He also notes that "the mouth often chips, especially in the area behind the cutter. You can flip over ten of these plane, and eight of them will be chipped, one will not be chipped but repaired, and the last perfect."

Well, besides the rust and cracked wood, this thing is COMPLETE and PERFECT. No chips or breaks (so I guess it's number ten.)

I've always wanted to try one of those "electrolysis bath" things that I've seen other people do on the internet. I think this would be the perfect candidate. I will also need to make a new tote and knob. I'll keep you posted on the process and I'm sure I'll have questions along the way.
Blake,
cool find and talk about timing! I too have a No 62 it was my G-Pa's, but has a crack by the mouth. Here's some pics:

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/6626
 

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Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack

Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane

Some of the modern high end hand tool manufacturers have been marketing "low angle jack planes" for years now like it is something nobody has ever thought of before. I mean, I had never heard of a low angle jack before I started reading reviews on Lie Nielson and Veritas versions in Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Veritas Low Angle Jack Plane:



And of course we all know that Stanley, the most famous maker of quality hand tools has SERIOUSLY BLOWN IT in the last several decades by manufacturing nothing but crap and letting other companies pick up where they left off. It took them long enough to realize what they had missed out on, and in 2009 they finally released a line of hand planes to compete with Lie Nielson and Veritas (among others)... the nostalgically-named "Sweetheart" line.

2009 Stanley No. 62 "Sweetheart" Low Angle Jack Plane:



Well I found out about a great website called The Best Things from another LJ post (sorry, I forget who). When I was browsing this website I saw a beautiful vintage Stanley plane that I had never hear of before. The Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane.



When I saw this picture I couldn't help getting excited. What a cool plane. I mean, a low angle jack is just kind of a sexy (not to mention useful) addition to a collection of hand planes. And realizing that the original VINTAGE thing was out there, and that they were somewhat RARE… I just had to have one.

Here's where working in a used tool store comes in handy… this came in to our shop the next day:

P1010006 1

P1010005

P1010007 1

P1010008 1

Now I know it know it will be a lot of work… tons of rust and a broken tote… but I think this will be a FUN project.

Now if you don't know about Patrick's Blood and Gore, its the best resource on the internet for information about Stanley planes. Anyway, according to Patrick, the Stanley No. 62 is "one of Stanley's better planes they ever decided to manufacture."

He also notes that "the mouth often chips, especially in the area behind the cutter. You can flip over ten of these plane, and eight of them will be chipped, one will not be chipped but repaired, and the last perfect."

Well, besides the rust and cracked wood, this thing is COMPLETE and PERFECT. No chips or breaks (so I guess it's number ten.)

I've always wanted to try one of those "electrolysis bath" things that I've seen other people do on the internet. I think this would be the perfect candidate. I will also need to make a new tote and knob. I'll keep you posted on the process and I'm sure I'll have questions along the way.
A thing of real beauty Blake; even in that state. Here's to the first shaving..
 

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Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack

Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane

Some of the modern high end hand tool manufacturers have been marketing "low angle jack planes" for years now like it is something nobody has ever thought of before. I mean, I had never heard of a low angle jack before I started reading reviews on Lie Nielson and Veritas versions in Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Veritas Low Angle Jack Plane:



And of course we all know that Stanley, the most famous maker of quality hand tools has SERIOUSLY BLOWN IT in the last several decades by manufacturing nothing but crap and letting other companies pick up where they left off. It took them long enough to realize what they had missed out on, and in 2009 they finally released a line of hand planes to compete with Lie Nielson and Veritas (among others)... the nostalgically-named "Sweetheart" line.

2009 Stanley No. 62 "Sweetheart" Low Angle Jack Plane:



Well I found out about a great website called The Best Things from another LJ post (sorry, I forget who). When I was browsing this website I saw a beautiful vintage Stanley plane that I had never hear of before. The Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane.



When I saw this picture I couldn't help getting excited. What a cool plane. I mean, a low angle jack is just kind of a sexy (not to mention useful) addition to a collection of hand planes. And realizing that the original VINTAGE thing was out there, and that they were somewhat RARE… I just had to have one.

Here's where working in a used tool store comes in handy… this came in to our shop the next day:

P1010006 1

P1010005

P1010007 1

P1010008 1

Now I know it know it will be a lot of work… tons of rust and a broken tote… but I think this will be a FUN project.

Now if you don't know about Patrick's Blood and Gore, its the best resource on the internet for information about Stanley planes. Anyway, according to Patrick, the Stanley No. 62 is "one of Stanley's better planes they ever decided to manufacture."

He also notes that "the mouth often chips, especially in the area behind the cutter. You can flip over ten of these plane, and eight of them will be chipped, one will not be chipped but repaired, and the last perfect."

Well, besides the rust and cracked wood, this thing is COMPLETE and PERFECT. No chips or breaks (so I guess it's number ten.)

I've always wanted to try one of those "electrolysis bath" things that I've seen other people do on the internet. I think this would be the perfect candidate. I will also need to make a new tote and knob. I'll keep you posted on the process and I'm sure I'll have questions along the way.
I am looking forward to seeing how this turns out. One thing I would consider is a replacement blade. Lie-Nielson has one for $45.

http://www.lie-nielsen.com/catalog.php?cat=512
 

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Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack

Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane

Some of the modern high end hand tool manufacturers have been marketing "low angle jack planes" for years now like it is something nobody has ever thought of before. I mean, I had never heard of a low angle jack before I started reading reviews on Lie Nielson and Veritas versions in Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Veritas Low Angle Jack Plane:



And of course we all know that Stanley, the most famous maker of quality hand tools has SERIOUSLY BLOWN IT in the last several decades by manufacturing nothing but crap and letting other companies pick up where they left off. It took them long enough to realize what they had missed out on, and in 2009 they finally released a line of hand planes to compete with Lie Nielson and Veritas (among others)... the nostalgically-named "Sweetheart" line.

2009 Stanley No. 62 "Sweetheart" Low Angle Jack Plane:



Well I found out about a great website called The Best Things from another LJ post (sorry, I forget who). When I was browsing this website I saw a beautiful vintage Stanley plane that I had never hear of before. The Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane.



When I saw this picture I couldn't help getting excited. What a cool plane. I mean, a low angle jack is just kind of a sexy (not to mention useful) addition to a collection of hand planes. And realizing that the original VINTAGE thing was out there, and that they were somewhat RARE… I just had to have one.

Here's where working in a used tool store comes in handy… this came in to our shop the next day:

P1010006 1

P1010005

P1010007 1

P1010008 1

Now I know it know it will be a lot of work… tons of rust and a broken tote… but I think this will be a FUN project.

Now if you don't know about Patrick's Blood and Gore, its the best resource on the internet for information about Stanley planes. Anyway, according to Patrick, the Stanley No. 62 is "one of Stanley's better planes they ever decided to manufacture."

He also notes that "the mouth often chips, especially in the area behind the cutter. You can flip over ten of these plane, and eight of them will be chipped, one will not be chipped but repaired, and the last perfect."

Well, besides the rust and cracked wood, this thing is COMPLETE and PERFECT. No chips or breaks (so I guess it's number ten.)

I've always wanted to try one of those "electrolysis bath" things that I've seen other people do on the internet. I think this would be the perfect candidate. I will also need to make a new tote and knob. I'll keep you posted on the process and I'm sure I'll have questions along the way.
It should clean up nice with electrolysis. Mine did.
 

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Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack

Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane

Some of the modern high end hand tool manufacturers have been marketing "low angle jack planes" for years now like it is something nobody has ever thought of before. I mean, I had never heard of a low angle jack before I started reading reviews on Lie Nielson and Veritas versions in Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Veritas Low Angle Jack Plane:



And of course we all know that Stanley, the most famous maker of quality hand tools has SERIOUSLY BLOWN IT in the last several decades by manufacturing nothing but crap and letting other companies pick up where they left off. It took them long enough to realize what they had missed out on, and in 2009 they finally released a line of hand planes to compete with Lie Nielson and Veritas (among others)... the nostalgically-named "Sweetheart" line.

2009 Stanley No. 62 "Sweetheart" Low Angle Jack Plane:



Well I found out about a great website called The Best Things from another LJ post (sorry, I forget who). When I was browsing this website I saw a beautiful vintage Stanley plane that I had never hear of before. The Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane.



When I saw this picture I couldn't help getting excited. What a cool plane. I mean, a low angle jack is just kind of a sexy (not to mention useful) addition to a collection of hand planes. And realizing that the original VINTAGE thing was out there, and that they were somewhat RARE… I just had to have one.

Here's where working in a used tool store comes in handy… this came in to our shop the next day:

P1010006 1

P1010005

P1010007 1

P1010008 1

Now I know it know it will be a lot of work… tons of rust and a broken tote… but I think this will be a FUN project.

Now if you don't know about Patrick's Blood and Gore, its the best resource on the internet for information about Stanley planes. Anyway, according to Patrick, the Stanley No. 62 is "one of Stanley's better planes they ever decided to manufacture."

He also notes that "the mouth often chips, especially in the area behind the cutter. You can flip over ten of these plane, and eight of them will be chipped, one will not be chipped but repaired, and the last perfect."

Well, besides the rust and cracked wood, this thing is COMPLETE and PERFECT. No chips or breaks (so I guess it's number ten.)

I've always wanted to try one of those "electrolysis bath" things that I've seen other people do on the internet. I think this would be the perfect candidate. I will also need to make a new tote and knob. I'll keep you posted on the process and I'm sure I'll have questions along the way.
When I was on the Lie-Nielsen site looking for the blade earlier, I noticed that they indicated that the 62 was their most versitile plane. I am sure this would hold true for the original Stanley version.

It sure is a pretty plane

 

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Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack

Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane

Some of the modern high end hand tool manufacturers have been marketing "low angle jack planes" for years now like it is something nobody has ever thought of before. I mean, I had never heard of a low angle jack before I started reading reviews on Lie Nielson and Veritas versions in Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Veritas Low Angle Jack Plane:



And of course we all know that Stanley, the most famous maker of quality hand tools has SERIOUSLY BLOWN IT in the last several decades by manufacturing nothing but crap and letting other companies pick up where they left off. It took them long enough to realize what they had missed out on, and in 2009 they finally released a line of hand planes to compete with Lie Nielson and Veritas (among others)... the nostalgically-named "Sweetheart" line.

2009 Stanley No. 62 "Sweetheart" Low Angle Jack Plane:



Well I found out about a great website called The Best Things from another LJ post (sorry, I forget who). When I was browsing this website I saw a beautiful vintage Stanley plane that I had never hear of before. The Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane.



When I saw this picture I couldn't help getting excited. What a cool plane. I mean, a low angle jack is just kind of a sexy (not to mention useful) addition to a collection of hand planes. And realizing that the original VINTAGE thing was out there, and that they were somewhat RARE… I just had to have one.

Here's where working in a used tool store comes in handy… this came in to our shop the next day:

P1010006 1

P1010005

P1010007 1

P1010008 1

Now I know it know it will be a lot of work… tons of rust and a broken tote… but I think this will be a FUN project.

Now if you don't know about Patrick's Blood and Gore, its the best resource on the internet for information about Stanley planes. Anyway, according to Patrick, the Stanley No. 62 is "one of Stanley's better planes they ever decided to manufacture."

He also notes that "the mouth often chips, especially in the area behind the cutter. You can flip over ten of these plane, and eight of them will be chipped, one will not be chipped but repaired, and the last perfect."

Well, besides the rust and cracked wood, this thing is COMPLETE and PERFECT. No chips or breaks (so I guess it's number ten.)

I've always wanted to try one of those "electrolysis bath" things that I've seen other people do on the internet. I think this would be the perfect candidate. I will also need to make a new tote and knob. I'll keep you posted on the process and I'm sure I'll have questions along the way.
Great find! I am a bit jealous! I recently purchased the Lie-Nielsen low angle jack plane. If your find turns out as good as the Lie-Nielsen version, you will quickly be finding most of your other planes collecting dust!
 

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9,509 Posts
Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack

Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane

Some of the modern high end hand tool manufacturers have been marketing "low angle jack planes" for years now like it is something nobody has ever thought of before. I mean, I had never heard of a low angle jack before I started reading reviews on Lie Nielson and Veritas versions in Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Veritas Low Angle Jack Plane:



And of course we all know that Stanley, the most famous maker of quality hand tools has SERIOUSLY BLOWN IT in the last several decades by manufacturing nothing but crap and letting other companies pick up where they left off. It took them long enough to realize what they had missed out on, and in 2009 they finally released a line of hand planes to compete with Lie Nielson and Veritas (among others)... the nostalgically-named "Sweetheart" line.

2009 Stanley No. 62 "Sweetheart" Low Angle Jack Plane:



Well I found out about a great website called The Best Things from another LJ post (sorry, I forget who). When I was browsing this website I saw a beautiful vintage Stanley plane that I had never hear of before. The Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane.



When I saw this picture I couldn't help getting excited. What a cool plane. I mean, a low angle jack is just kind of a sexy (not to mention useful) addition to a collection of hand planes. And realizing that the original VINTAGE thing was out there, and that they were somewhat RARE… I just had to have one.

Here's where working in a used tool store comes in handy… this came in to our shop the next day:

P1010006 1

P1010005

P1010007 1

P1010008 1

Now I know it know it will be a lot of work… tons of rust and a broken tote… but I think this will be a FUN project.

Now if you don't know about Patrick's Blood and Gore, its the best resource on the internet for information about Stanley planes. Anyway, according to Patrick, the Stanley No. 62 is "one of Stanley's better planes they ever decided to manufacture."

He also notes that "the mouth often chips, especially in the area behind the cutter. You can flip over ten of these plane, and eight of them will be chipped, one will not be chipped but repaired, and the last perfect."

Well, besides the rust and cracked wood, this thing is COMPLETE and PERFECT. No chips or breaks (so I guess it's number ten.)

I've always wanted to try one of those "electrolysis bath" things that I've seen other people do on the internet. I think this would be the perfect candidate. I will also need to make a new tote and knob. I'll keep you posted on the process and I'm sure I'll have questions along the way.
I found one today blake. Hope it turns out as nice…..
 

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Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack

Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane

Some of the modern high end hand tool manufacturers have been marketing "low angle jack planes" for years now like it is something nobody has ever thought of before. I mean, I had never heard of a low angle jack before I started reading reviews on Lie Nielson and Veritas versions in Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Veritas Low Angle Jack Plane:



And of course we all know that Stanley, the most famous maker of quality hand tools has SERIOUSLY BLOWN IT in the last several decades by manufacturing nothing but crap and letting other companies pick up where they left off. It took them long enough to realize what they had missed out on, and in 2009 they finally released a line of hand planes to compete with Lie Nielson and Veritas (among others)... the nostalgically-named "Sweetheart" line.

2009 Stanley No. 62 "Sweetheart" Low Angle Jack Plane:



Well I found out about a great website called The Best Things from another LJ post (sorry, I forget who). When I was browsing this website I saw a beautiful vintage Stanley plane that I had never hear of before. The Stanley No. 62 Low Angle Jack Plane.



When I saw this picture I couldn't help getting excited. What a cool plane. I mean, a low angle jack is just kind of a sexy (not to mention useful) addition to a collection of hand planes. And realizing that the original VINTAGE thing was out there, and that they were somewhat RARE… I just had to have one.

Here's where working in a used tool store comes in handy… this came in to our shop the next day:

P1010006 1

P1010005

P1010007 1

P1010008 1

Now I know it know it will be a lot of work… tons of rust and a broken tote… but I think this will be a FUN project.

Now if you don't know about Patrick's Blood and Gore, its the best resource on the internet for information about Stanley planes. Anyway, according to Patrick, the Stanley No. 62 is "one of Stanley's better planes they ever decided to manufacture."

He also notes that "the mouth often chips, especially in the area behind the cutter. You can flip over ten of these plane, and eight of them will be chipped, one will not be chipped but repaired, and the last perfect."

Well, besides the rust and cracked wood, this thing is COMPLETE and PERFECT. No chips or breaks (so I guess it's number ten.)

I've always wanted to try one of those "electrolysis bath" things that I've seen other people do on the internet. I think this would be the perfect candidate. I will also need to make a new tote and knob. I'll keep you posted on the process and I'm sure I'll have questions along the way.
That's YOURS? Add yourself to the people I hate;) Dream plane for me, Stanley only; LN boring. Veritas even more so. Insert flames below. You just got yourself something that I dream about nightly, and I'm a plane guy :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #98 ·
Bench Almost Complete

More bench progress…

Here is the "tail" vice mortised into the end of the bench. You can also see how the underside of the bench looks with all the different widths I used:

P1010011

Clamping on the wider "apron" pieces front and back:

P1010006

And adding the end aprons with dowels:

P1010007

P1010008

P1010009

P1010010

As you can see I painted the 4×6 fir base black:

P1010030

I leveled the table with shims under the feet and then bolted the legs to the floor:



And then the fun part began…

P1010012

P1010014

I routed the edges of my vice jaws on the router table:

P1010018

P1010020

The vices came out really nicely. I made the tail vice so it would span across the entire width of the bench. That way I could have bench dogs along both edges of the bench for wide clamping.

P1010021

P1010023

Nearly complete… now all I have to do is add the dog holes, and a little sanding/finishing. I actually made it to the Sacramento Woodworking Show on Sunday and picked up some brass Veritas bench dogs.

P1010027

I think it looks really good with the black base.

P1010025

(See all the shavings on the floor!)

UPDATE:

Here are the links to the finished bench and cabinet in my projects:

 

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1,460 Posts
Bench Almost Complete

More bench progress…

Here is the "tail" vice mortised into the end of the bench. You can also see how the underside of the bench looks with all the different widths I used:

P1010011

Clamping on the wider "apron" pieces front and back:

P1010006

And adding the end aprons with dowels:

P1010007

P1010008

P1010009

P1010010

As you can see I painted the 4×6 fir base black:

P1010030

I leveled the table with shims under the feet and then bolted the legs to the floor:



And then the fun part began…

P1010012

P1010014

I routed the edges of my vice jaws on the router table:

P1010018

P1010020

The vices came out really nicely. I made the tail vice so it would span across the entire width of the bench. That way I could have bench dogs along both edges of the bench for wide clamping.

P1010021

P1010023

Nearly complete… now all I have to do is add the dog holes, and a little sanding/finishing. I actually made it to the Sacramento Woodworking Show on Sunday and picked up some brass Veritas bench dogs.

P1010027

I think it looks really good with the black base.

P1010025

(See all the shavings on the floor!)

UPDATE:

Here are the links to the finished bench and cabinet in my projects:

Looking good Blake
 

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3,540 Posts
Bench Almost Complete

More bench progress…

Here is the "tail" vice mortised into the end of the bench. You can also see how the underside of the bench looks with all the different widths I used:

P1010011

Clamping on the wider "apron" pieces front and back:

P1010006

And adding the end aprons with dowels:

P1010007

P1010008

P1010009

P1010010

As you can see I painted the 4×6 fir base black:

P1010030

I leveled the table with shims under the feet and then bolted the legs to the floor:



And then the fun part began…

P1010012

P1010014

I routed the edges of my vice jaws on the router table:

P1010018

P1010020

The vices came out really nicely. I made the tail vice so it would span across the entire width of the bench. That way I could have bench dogs along both edges of the bench for wide clamping.

P1010021

P1010023

Nearly complete… now all I have to do is add the dog holes, and a little sanding/finishing. I actually made it to the Sacramento Woodworking Show on Sunday and picked up some brass Veritas bench dogs.

P1010027

I think it looks really good with the black base.

P1010025

(See all the shavings on the floor!)

UPDATE:

Here are the links to the finished bench and cabinet in my projects:

Blake, If the wood handles are loose and slide freely, be sure to install a leather ring on each end to act as a pad or buffer between the end of the handle and the metal sleeve that holds it. This will save the end of the handle from the shock of sliding down and slamming into the metal.

Looks like a great table. You will love working on a nice bench. It will greatly facilitate your efficiency and productivity. It is one of the best tools you will have in the shop.
 
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