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Discussion Starter · #61 ·
Building a Work Bench

I did a trade for some woodwork with a guy who had a garage full of lumber and several nice hand tools. Most of the lumber was Oak.

I don't really like working with Oak. But I thought it would be perfect for a bench, and there was enough of it. I got lots of different lengths and widths. Most of it was 3/4". I forgot to take a "before" photo of the stack but here is a sample:



Now I intend to make a nice, sturdy bench, but its going to be more functional than artful masterpiece. Just something that I can really use with hand tools. Its my first bench, and there will be others later. So I really want this to be a quick project so I can get back to work on the stuff I really want to build.

Some may call this a "hack job." Call me a butcher, but I didn't even bother ripping the strips to the same width. As long as one side is flat, thats all that matters.

I started by rolling on the glue and clamping together sections of a half-dozen or so boards:



Then I glued up two of those sections:




At this point I have two sections that are less than 8" wide. This way they will fit on my 8" jointer to get one flat side.

Here is what the top will look like (It hasn't been jointed yet)



Here is the underside (notice the uneven widths)



The ends of the tool tray:



The sections laid out and ready for final assembly:




Don't worry, that endgrain will be covered with an end piece. For less than $20 bucks I got enough 4×6 and 2×6 Doug Fir for a very sturdy base. I also have a piece of solid mahogany re-claimed from an old desk for a bottom shelf, and a huge woodworking vice I got years ago at the flea market.

My friend the glue chisel…

On a side note, I thought I would take a moment to appreciate a very under-rated tool… My glue chisel. Its the old workhorse who doesn't whine or complain about the not so glamorous tasks like scraping semi-wet glue off a workpiece, gouging out a nail, prying double-stick-taped jigs apart, or popping bark off of a log.





Everyone should have a "glue chisel" ...someone's got to do the dirty work.
Brian…

All I'm doing is squishing boards together with glue. You're lucky I only have one afternoon a week for woodworking right now, otherwise you might have to let it go.
 

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Building a Work Bench

I did a trade for some woodwork with a guy who had a garage full of lumber and several nice hand tools. Most of the lumber was Oak.

I don't really like working with Oak. But I thought it would be perfect for a bench, and there was enough of it. I got lots of different lengths and widths. Most of it was 3/4". I forgot to take a "before" photo of the stack but here is a sample:



Now I intend to make a nice, sturdy bench, but its going to be more functional than artful masterpiece. Just something that I can really use with hand tools. Its my first bench, and there will be others later. So I really want this to be a quick project so I can get back to work on the stuff I really want to build.

Some may call this a "hack job." Call me a butcher, but I didn't even bother ripping the strips to the same width. As long as one side is flat, thats all that matters.

I started by rolling on the glue and clamping together sections of a half-dozen or so boards:



Then I glued up two of those sections:




At this point I have two sections that are less than 8" wide. This way they will fit on my 8" jointer to get one flat side.

Here is what the top will look like (It hasn't been jointed yet)



Here is the underside (notice the uneven widths)



The ends of the tool tray:



The sections laid out and ready for final assembly:




Don't worry, that endgrain will be covered with an end piece. For less than $20 bucks I got enough 4×6 and 2×6 Doug Fir for a very sturdy base. I also have a piece of solid mahogany re-claimed from an old desk for a bottom shelf, and a huge woodworking vice I got years ago at the flea market.

My friend the glue chisel…

On a side note, I thought I would take a moment to appreciate a very under-rated tool… My glue chisel. Its the old workhorse who doesn't whine or complain about the not so glamorous tasks like scraping semi-wet glue off a workpiece, gouging out a nail, prying double-stick-taped jigs apart, or popping bark off of a log.





Everyone should have a "glue chisel" ...someone's got to do the dirty work.
A few months back I stumbled upon the tail end of a two-day garage sale where a huge box of oak flooring sat in a dusty corner nobody wanted. Not enough to floor a room but enough for a knock-about benchtop. For $5, glued to oak ply sheets it looks a beauty. You can bang away to your heart's content.

My trusty "glue chisel" has been with me more than 30 years. Opens paint can lids and scrapes glue from concrete floors, it's one of my best beloved tools.

Best,
Peter
 

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Building a Work Bench

I did a trade for some woodwork with a guy who had a garage full of lumber and several nice hand tools. Most of the lumber was Oak.

I don't really like working with Oak. But I thought it would be perfect for a bench, and there was enough of it. I got lots of different lengths and widths. Most of it was 3/4". I forgot to take a "before" photo of the stack but here is a sample:



Now I intend to make a nice, sturdy bench, but its going to be more functional than artful masterpiece. Just something that I can really use with hand tools. Its my first bench, and there will be others later. So I really want this to be a quick project so I can get back to work on the stuff I really want to build.

Some may call this a "hack job." Call me a butcher, but I didn't even bother ripping the strips to the same width. As long as one side is flat, thats all that matters.

I started by rolling on the glue and clamping together sections of a half-dozen or so boards:



Then I glued up two of those sections:




At this point I have two sections that are less than 8" wide. This way they will fit on my 8" jointer to get one flat side.

Here is what the top will look like (It hasn't been jointed yet)



Here is the underside (notice the uneven widths)



The ends of the tool tray:



The sections laid out and ready for final assembly:




Don't worry, that endgrain will be covered with an end piece. For less than $20 bucks I got enough 4×6 and 2×6 Doug Fir for a very sturdy base. I also have a piece of solid mahogany re-claimed from an old desk for a bottom shelf, and a huge woodworking vice I got years ago at the flea market.

My friend the glue chisel…

On a side note, I thought I would take a moment to appreciate a very under-rated tool… My glue chisel. Its the old workhorse who doesn't whine or complain about the not so glamorous tasks like scraping semi-wet glue off a workpiece, gouging out a nail, prying double-stick-taped jigs apart, or popping bark off of a log.





Everyone should have a "glue chisel" ...someone's got to do the dirty work.
That is going to be one helluva of a hefty bench, as it should be. I look forward to followiing the progress.
 
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Building a Work Bench

I did a trade for some woodwork with a guy who had a garage full of lumber and several nice hand tools. Most of the lumber was Oak.

I don't really like working with Oak. But I thought it would be perfect for a bench, and there was enough of it. I got lots of different lengths and widths. Most of it was 3/4". I forgot to take a "before" photo of the stack but here is a sample:



Now I intend to make a nice, sturdy bench, but its going to be more functional than artful masterpiece. Just something that I can really use with hand tools. Its my first bench, and there will be others later. So I really want this to be a quick project so I can get back to work on the stuff I really want to build.

Some may call this a "hack job." Call me a butcher, but I didn't even bother ripping the strips to the same width. As long as one side is flat, thats all that matters.

I started by rolling on the glue and clamping together sections of a half-dozen or so boards:



Then I glued up two of those sections:




At this point I have two sections that are less than 8" wide. This way they will fit on my 8" jointer to get one flat side.

Here is what the top will look like (It hasn't been jointed yet)



Here is the underside (notice the uneven widths)



The ends of the tool tray:



The sections laid out and ready for final assembly:




Don't worry, that endgrain will be covered with an end piece. For less than $20 bucks I got enough 4×6 and 2×6 Doug Fir for a very sturdy base. I also have a piece of solid mahogany re-claimed from an old desk for a bottom shelf, and a huge woodworking vice I got years ago at the flea market.

My friend the glue chisel…

On a side note, I thought I would take a moment to appreciate a very under-rated tool… My glue chisel. Its the old workhorse who doesn't whine or complain about the not so glamorous tasks like scraping semi-wet glue off a workpiece, gouging out a nail, prying double-stick-taped jigs apart, or popping bark off of a log.





Everyone should have a "glue chisel" ...someone's got to do the dirty work.
Looks great!
 

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Building a Work Bench

I did a trade for some woodwork with a guy who had a garage full of lumber and several nice hand tools. Most of the lumber was Oak.

I don't really like working with Oak. But I thought it would be perfect for a bench, and there was enough of it. I got lots of different lengths and widths. Most of it was 3/4". I forgot to take a "before" photo of the stack but here is a sample:



Now I intend to make a nice, sturdy bench, but its going to be more functional than artful masterpiece. Just something that I can really use with hand tools. Its my first bench, and there will be others later. So I really want this to be a quick project so I can get back to work on the stuff I really want to build.

Some may call this a "hack job." Call me a butcher, but I didn't even bother ripping the strips to the same width. As long as one side is flat, thats all that matters.

I started by rolling on the glue and clamping together sections of a half-dozen or so boards:



Then I glued up two of those sections:




At this point I have two sections that are less than 8" wide. This way they will fit on my 8" jointer to get one flat side.

Here is what the top will look like (It hasn't been jointed yet)



Here is the underside (notice the uneven widths)



The ends of the tool tray:



The sections laid out and ready for final assembly:




Don't worry, that endgrain will be covered with an end piece. For less than $20 bucks I got enough 4×6 and 2×6 Doug Fir for a very sturdy base. I also have a piece of solid mahogany re-claimed from an old desk for a bottom shelf, and a huge woodworking vice I got years ago at the flea market.

My friend the glue chisel…

On a side note, I thought I would take a moment to appreciate a very under-rated tool… My glue chisel. Its the old workhorse who doesn't whine or complain about the not so glamorous tasks like scraping semi-wet glue off a workpiece, gouging out a nail, prying double-stick-taped jigs apart, or popping bark off of a log.





Everyone should have a "glue chisel" ...someone's got to do the dirty work.
Looks great. I'm begining to make plans for a bench and you have inspired me to begin. My thoughts on the top would be to make 6" sections, joint and plane them to thickness. Then glue the sections together. Anyone have ideas for the best wood for a bench? Maple, hickory, birch, beech, etc.
CDC
 

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Discussion Starter · #66 ·
Building a Work Bench

I did a trade for some woodwork with a guy who had a garage full of lumber and several nice hand tools. Most of the lumber was Oak.

I don't really like working with Oak. But I thought it would be perfect for a bench, and there was enough of it. I got lots of different lengths and widths. Most of it was 3/4". I forgot to take a "before" photo of the stack but here is a sample:



Now I intend to make a nice, sturdy bench, but its going to be more functional than artful masterpiece. Just something that I can really use with hand tools. Its my first bench, and there will be others later. So I really want this to be a quick project so I can get back to work on the stuff I really want to build.

Some may call this a "hack job." Call me a butcher, but I didn't even bother ripping the strips to the same width. As long as one side is flat, thats all that matters.

I started by rolling on the glue and clamping together sections of a half-dozen or so boards:



Then I glued up two of those sections:




At this point I have two sections that are less than 8" wide. This way they will fit on my 8" jointer to get one flat side.

Here is what the top will look like (It hasn't been jointed yet)



Here is the underside (notice the uneven widths)



The ends of the tool tray:



The sections laid out and ready for final assembly:




Don't worry, that endgrain will be covered with an end piece. For less than $20 bucks I got enough 4×6 and 2×6 Doug Fir for a very sturdy base. I also have a piece of solid mahogany re-claimed from an old desk for a bottom shelf, and a huge woodworking vice I got years ago at the flea market.

My friend the glue chisel…

On a side note, I thought I would take a moment to appreciate a very under-rated tool… My glue chisel. Its the old workhorse who doesn't whine or complain about the not so glamorous tasks like scraping semi-wet glue off a workpiece, gouging out a nail, prying double-stick-taped jigs apart, or popping bark off of a log.





Everyone should have a "glue chisel" ...someone's got to do the dirty work.
Anything hard and heavy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #67 ·
More Bench Progress

Once I had my two larger bench sections glued up I ran them through the planer…



And chopped the ends square



I used my biscuit jointer to align the two laminated "slabs," since after this glue up it will be too big to run through my thickness planer:





Two slabs glued up:



And now glued up with the tool tray:



THE BASE

I spent $18.00 on 4×6 and 2×6 Doug Fir for the base at Home Depot:



A little shaping of the feet on the bandsaw, and oak pads added:



Mortise cut on the RAS (I do it this way because it is fast)



Leg assembly:



The assembled base (screws and glue… but the screws are well hidden)



A little preview of the whole thing together with the huge old Craftsman vice from the flea market:



By the way, the base alone is MASSIVE. It will weigh a ton with the solid oak top sitting on it.

The top will still get wide edges that wrap around all four sides. This will give the sides more surface area as well as make the top look more substantial (the base won't look so disproportionately huge.)

I haven't decided whether to stain or paint the base (maybe black?)... or leave it natural. I think something darker would look nice and de-emphasize the fact that I used construction-grade lumber.

Any thoughts?

Also, what kind of finish do I use on the oak top? Just oil?
 

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More Bench Progress

Once I had my two larger bench sections glued up I ran them through the planer…



And chopped the ends square



I used my biscuit jointer to align the two laminated "slabs," since after this glue up it will be too big to run through my thickness planer:





Two slabs glued up:



And now glued up with the tool tray:



THE BASE

I spent $18.00 on 4×6 and 2×6 Doug Fir for the base at Home Depot:



A little shaping of the feet on the bandsaw, and oak pads added:



Mortise cut on the RAS (I do it this way because it is fast)



Leg assembly:



The assembled base (screws and glue… but the screws are well hidden)



A little preview of the whole thing together with the huge old Craftsman vice from the flea market:



By the way, the base alone is MASSIVE. It will weigh a ton with the solid oak top sitting on it.

The top will still get wide edges that wrap around all four sides. This will give the sides more surface area as well as make the top look more substantial (the base won't look so disproportionately huge.)

I haven't decided whether to stain or paint the base (maybe black?)... or leave it natural. I think something darker would look nice and de-emphasize the fact that I used construction-grade lumber.

Any thoughts?

Also, what kind of finish do I use on the oak top? Just oil?
Just oil it. The top will be really easy to care for if all you do is keep it oiled.
 

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More Bench Progress

Once I had my two larger bench sections glued up I ran them through the planer…



And chopped the ends square



I used my biscuit jointer to align the two laminated "slabs," since after this glue up it will be too big to run through my thickness planer:





Two slabs glued up:



And now glued up with the tool tray:



THE BASE

I spent $18.00 on 4×6 and 2×6 Doug Fir for the base at Home Depot:



A little shaping of the feet on the bandsaw, and oak pads added:



Mortise cut on the RAS (I do it this way because it is fast)



Leg assembly:



The assembled base (screws and glue… but the screws are well hidden)



A little preview of the whole thing together with the huge old Craftsman vice from the flea market:



By the way, the base alone is MASSIVE. It will weigh a ton with the solid oak top sitting on it.

The top will still get wide edges that wrap around all four sides. This will give the sides more surface area as well as make the top look more substantial (the base won't look so disproportionately huge.)

I haven't decided whether to stain or paint the base (maybe black?)... or leave it natural. I think something darker would look nice and de-emphasize the fact that I used construction-grade lumber.

Any thoughts?

Also, what kind of finish do I use on the oak top? Just oil?
I think that a black or dark stain would look really cool on the bottom. It will definitely make the top look larger, too.
 

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More Bench Progress

Once I had my two larger bench sections glued up I ran them through the planer…



And chopped the ends square



I used my biscuit jointer to align the two laminated "slabs," since after this glue up it will be too big to run through my thickness planer:





Two slabs glued up:



And now glued up with the tool tray:



THE BASE

I spent $18.00 on 4×6 and 2×6 Doug Fir for the base at Home Depot:



A little shaping of the feet on the bandsaw, and oak pads added:



Mortise cut on the RAS (I do it this way because it is fast)



Leg assembly:



The assembled base (screws and glue… but the screws are well hidden)



A little preview of the whole thing together with the huge old Craftsman vice from the flea market:



By the way, the base alone is MASSIVE. It will weigh a ton with the solid oak top sitting on it.

The top will still get wide edges that wrap around all four sides. This will give the sides more surface area as well as make the top look more substantial (the base won't look so disproportionately huge.)

I haven't decided whether to stain or paint the base (maybe black?)... or leave it natural. I think something darker would look nice and de-emphasize the fact that I used construction-grade lumber.

Any thoughts?

Also, what kind of finish do I use on the oak top? Just oil?
For a finish I would go BLO / Wax and call it good. Why hide the base under paint just because there are a couple of knots? Consider them character and move on. It is a workbench after all, and not a china hutch…
 

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More Bench Progress

Once I had my two larger bench sections glued up I ran them through the planer…



And chopped the ends square



I used my biscuit jointer to align the two laminated "slabs," since after this glue up it will be too big to run through my thickness planer:





Two slabs glued up:



And now glued up with the tool tray:



THE BASE

I spent $18.00 on 4×6 and 2×6 Doug Fir for the base at Home Depot:



A little shaping of the feet on the bandsaw, and oak pads added:



Mortise cut on the RAS (I do it this way because it is fast)



Leg assembly:



The assembled base (screws and glue… but the screws are well hidden)



A little preview of the whole thing together with the huge old Craftsman vice from the flea market:



By the way, the base alone is MASSIVE. It will weigh a ton with the solid oak top sitting on it.

The top will still get wide edges that wrap around all four sides. This will give the sides more surface area as well as make the top look more substantial (the base won't look so disproportionately huge.)

I haven't decided whether to stain or paint the base (maybe black?)... or leave it natural. I think something darker would look nice and de-emphasize the fact that I used construction-grade lumber.

Any thoughts?

Also, what kind of finish do I use on the oak top? Just oil?
I was surprised to see the Dewalt radial arm saw in one of your pictures. I grew up using one like it in my dad's shop. And yes, that was a long time ago! I think my brother may still have it. Brings back old memories, some of them actually good.

Thanks

By the way-Nice bench (And I would use oil on the top, and maybe stain the base darker and then oil it too)
 

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More Bench Progress

Once I had my two larger bench sections glued up I ran them through the planer…



And chopped the ends square



I used my biscuit jointer to align the two laminated "slabs," since after this glue up it will be too big to run through my thickness planer:





Two slabs glued up:



And now glued up with the tool tray:



THE BASE

I spent $18.00 on 4×6 and 2×6 Doug Fir for the base at Home Depot:



A little shaping of the feet on the bandsaw, and oak pads added:



Mortise cut on the RAS (I do it this way because it is fast)



Leg assembly:



The assembled base (screws and glue… but the screws are well hidden)



A little preview of the whole thing together with the huge old Craftsman vice from the flea market:



By the way, the base alone is MASSIVE. It will weigh a ton with the solid oak top sitting on it.

The top will still get wide edges that wrap around all four sides. This will give the sides more surface area as well as make the top look more substantial (the base won't look so disproportionately huge.)

I haven't decided whether to stain or paint the base (maybe black?)... or leave it natural. I think something darker would look nice and de-emphasize the fact that I used construction-grade lumber.

Any thoughts?

Also, what kind of finish do I use on the oak top? Just oil?
I simply oiled the legs of my workbench, that is the one that acts as an out feed for my tablesaw. It is 4"x4" doug fir and looks like yours.

Over time the legs have turned dark and they look great. They have been dinged and dented but there is no film finish to flake off.

I have also splattered them with paint or finish and I just used a rag dampened with solvent to wipe them off.

A card scraper is used to scrape off dried stuff and I apply more oil. Taking care couldn't be easier.
 
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More Bench Progress

Once I had my two larger bench sections glued up I ran them through the planer…



And chopped the ends square



I used my biscuit jointer to align the two laminated "slabs," since after this glue up it will be too big to run through my thickness planer:





Two slabs glued up:



And now glued up with the tool tray:



THE BASE

I spent $18.00 on 4×6 and 2×6 Doug Fir for the base at Home Depot:



A little shaping of the feet on the bandsaw, and oak pads added:



Mortise cut on the RAS (I do it this way because it is fast)



Leg assembly:



The assembled base (screws and glue… but the screws are well hidden)



A little preview of the whole thing together with the huge old Craftsman vice from the flea market:



By the way, the base alone is MASSIVE. It will weigh a ton with the solid oak top sitting on it.

The top will still get wide edges that wrap around all four sides. This will give the sides more surface area as well as make the top look more substantial (the base won't look so disproportionately huge.)

I haven't decided whether to stain or paint the base (maybe black?)... or leave it natural. I think something darker would look nice and de-emphasize the fact that I used construction-grade lumber.

Any thoughts?

Also, what kind of finish do I use on the oak top? Just oil?
Looks great, Blake.
 

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More Bench Progress

Once I had my two larger bench sections glued up I ran them through the planer…



And chopped the ends square



I used my biscuit jointer to align the two laminated "slabs," since after this glue up it will be too big to run through my thickness planer:





Two slabs glued up:



And now glued up with the tool tray:



THE BASE

I spent $18.00 on 4×6 and 2×6 Doug Fir for the base at Home Depot:



A little shaping of the feet on the bandsaw, and oak pads added:



Mortise cut on the RAS (I do it this way because it is fast)



Leg assembly:



The assembled base (screws and glue… but the screws are well hidden)



A little preview of the whole thing together with the huge old Craftsman vice from the flea market:



By the way, the base alone is MASSIVE. It will weigh a ton with the solid oak top sitting on it.

The top will still get wide edges that wrap around all four sides. This will give the sides more surface area as well as make the top look more substantial (the base won't look so disproportionately huge.)

I haven't decided whether to stain or paint the base (maybe black?)... or leave it natural. I think something darker would look nice and de-emphasize the fact that I used construction-grade lumber.

Any thoughts?

Also, what kind of finish do I use on the oak top? Just oil?
Blake, this bench certainly is looking pretty good. It is an inspiration for me to get in the shop and get started on one of my own.
 

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More Bench Progress

Once I had my two larger bench sections glued up I ran them through the planer…



And chopped the ends square



I used my biscuit jointer to align the two laminated "slabs," since after this glue up it will be too big to run through my thickness planer:





Two slabs glued up:



And now glued up with the tool tray:



THE BASE

I spent $18.00 on 4×6 and 2×6 Doug Fir for the base at Home Depot:



A little shaping of the feet on the bandsaw, and oak pads added:



Mortise cut on the RAS (I do it this way because it is fast)



Leg assembly:



The assembled base (screws and glue… but the screws are well hidden)



A little preview of the whole thing together with the huge old Craftsman vice from the flea market:



By the way, the base alone is MASSIVE. It will weigh a ton with the solid oak top sitting on it.

The top will still get wide edges that wrap around all four sides. This will give the sides more surface area as well as make the top look more substantial (the base won't look so disproportionately huge.)

I haven't decided whether to stain or paint the base (maybe black?)... or leave it natural. I think something darker would look nice and de-emphasize the fact that I used construction-grade lumber.

Any thoughts?

Also, what kind of finish do I use on the oak top? Just oil?
Hey Blake a dark color for your base will show dust pretty easy. If you want to paint it I would suggest a lighter color. Some of those Shaker benches I've seen with painted bases look great to me. It also give the shop a nice atmosphere. I've got a lot of painted stuff in my shop and I really like it.
 

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More Bench Progress

Once I had my two larger bench sections glued up I ran them through the planer…



And chopped the ends square



I used my biscuit jointer to align the two laminated "slabs," since after this glue up it will be too big to run through my thickness planer:





Two slabs glued up:



And now glued up with the tool tray:



THE BASE

I spent $18.00 on 4×6 and 2×6 Doug Fir for the base at Home Depot:



A little shaping of the feet on the bandsaw, and oak pads added:



Mortise cut on the RAS (I do it this way because it is fast)



Leg assembly:



The assembled base (screws and glue… but the screws are well hidden)



A little preview of the whole thing together with the huge old Craftsman vice from the flea market:



By the way, the base alone is MASSIVE. It will weigh a ton with the solid oak top sitting on it.

The top will still get wide edges that wrap around all four sides. This will give the sides more surface area as well as make the top look more substantial (the base won't look so disproportionately huge.)

I haven't decided whether to stain or paint the base (maybe black?)... or leave it natural. I think something darker would look nice and de-emphasize the fact that I used construction-grade lumber.

Any thoughts?

Also, what kind of finish do I use on the oak top? Just oil?
Do not hide the natural beauty of the wood, let nature take its course - Fir takes a lovely patina quite quickly - maybe some oil or wax to help prevent splashes of stain or paint spoiling the wood too much - whats the difference between construction grade Fir and Fir that you have cut your self? apart from the cost
 

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More Bench Progress

Once I had my two larger bench sections glued up I ran them through the planer…



And chopped the ends square



I used my biscuit jointer to align the two laminated "slabs," since after this glue up it will be too big to run through my thickness planer:





Two slabs glued up:



And now glued up with the tool tray:



THE BASE

I spent $18.00 on 4×6 and 2×6 Doug Fir for the base at Home Depot:



A little shaping of the feet on the bandsaw, and oak pads added:



Mortise cut on the RAS (I do it this way because it is fast)



Leg assembly:



The assembled base (screws and glue… but the screws are well hidden)



A little preview of the whole thing together with the huge old Craftsman vice from the flea market:



By the way, the base alone is MASSIVE. It will weigh a ton with the solid oak top sitting on it.

The top will still get wide edges that wrap around all four sides. This will give the sides more surface area as well as make the top look more substantial (the base won't look so disproportionately huge.)

I haven't decided whether to stain or paint the base (maybe black?)... or leave it natural. I think something darker would look nice and de-emphasize the fact that I used construction-grade lumber.

Any thoughts?

Also, what kind of finish do I use on the oak top? Just oil?
Looks super sturdy good job
 

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More Bench Progress

Once I had my two larger bench sections glued up I ran them through the planer…



And chopped the ends square



I used my biscuit jointer to align the two laminated "slabs," since after this glue up it will be too big to run through my thickness planer:





Two slabs glued up:



And now glued up with the tool tray:



THE BASE

I spent $18.00 on 4×6 and 2×6 Doug Fir for the base at Home Depot:



A little shaping of the feet on the bandsaw, and oak pads added:



Mortise cut on the RAS (I do it this way because it is fast)



Leg assembly:



The assembled base (screws and glue… but the screws are well hidden)



A little preview of the whole thing together with the huge old Craftsman vice from the flea market:



By the way, the base alone is MASSIVE. It will weigh a ton with the solid oak top sitting on it.

The top will still get wide edges that wrap around all four sides. This will give the sides more surface area as well as make the top look more substantial (the base won't look so disproportionately huge.)

I haven't decided whether to stain or paint the base (maybe black?)... or leave it natural. I think something darker would look nice and de-emphasize the fact that I used construction-grade lumber.

Any thoughts?

Also, what kind of finish do I use on the oak top? Just oil?
Blake,

This is looking great. I am on the fence about painting the base. I think painting it black would look very cool & unique but at the same time leaving with just some oil as Todd and others have mentioned would look great too. Equally impressive as the build is the budget at which you are building this bench. What are the overall dimensions of the bench?
 

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Discussion Starter · #79 ·
More Bench Progress

Once I had my two larger bench sections glued up I ran them through the planer…



And chopped the ends square



I used my biscuit jointer to align the two laminated "slabs," since after this glue up it will be too big to run through my thickness planer:





Two slabs glued up:



And now glued up with the tool tray:



THE BASE

I spent $18.00 on 4×6 and 2×6 Doug Fir for the base at Home Depot:



A little shaping of the feet on the bandsaw, and oak pads added:



Mortise cut on the RAS (I do it this way because it is fast)



Leg assembly:



The assembled base (screws and glue… but the screws are well hidden)



A little preview of the whole thing together with the huge old Craftsman vice from the flea market:



By the way, the base alone is MASSIVE. It will weigh a ton with the solid oak top sitting on it.

The top will still get wide edges that wrap around all four sides. This will give the sides more surface area as well as make the top look more substantial (the base won't look so disproportionately huge.)

I haven't decided whether to stain or paint the base (maybe black?)... or leave it natural. I think something darker would look nice and de-emphasize the fact that I used construction-grade lumber.

Any thoughts?

Also, what kind of finish do I use on the oak top? Just oil?
About 2' by 4'

I'm gonna paint it black. Don't worry, it will look good.
 

· Registered
Joined
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1,329 Posts
More Bench Progress

Once I had my two larger bench sections glued up I ran them through the planer…



And chopped the ends square



I used my biscuit jointer to align the two laminated "slabs," since after this glue up it will be too big to run through my thickness planer:





Two slabs glued up:



And now glued up with the tool tray:



THE BASE

I spent $18.00 on 4×6 and 2×6 Doug Fir for the base at Home Depot:



A little shaping of the feet on the bandsaw, and oak pads added:



Mortise cut on the RAS (I do it this way because it is fast)



Leg assembly:



The assembled base (screws and glue… but the screws are well hidden)



A little preview of the whole thing together with the huge old Craftsman vice from the flea market:



By the way, the base alone is MASSIVE. It will weigh a ton with the solid oak top sitting on it.

The top will still get wide edges that wrap around all four sides. This will give the sides more surface area as well as make the top look more substantial (the base won't look so disproportionately huge.)

I haven't decided whether to stain or paint the base (maybe black?)... or leave it natural. I think something darker would look nice and de-emphasize the fact that I used construction-grade lumber.

Any thoughts?

Also, what kind of finish do I use on the oak top? Just oil?
Blake says, "Don't worry, it will look good."

For some that might be bragging. However, Blake, it's a natural consequence of your work. I cannot imagine you leaving even a workbench plain and unadorned. You've got a great eye and your work always looks good. This bench is no exception.
 
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