LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
1,699 Posts
Amazing find... Maebiki-nokogiri

So as I have mentioned in previous blogs, I have been studying and collecting Japanese hand tools. And my favorite book which has inspired the collection is JAPANESE WOODWORKING TOOLS by Toshio Odate.



In this book there is a section on saws (Nokogiri) where Odate proudly displays a favorite in his collection:





This saw was a rip saw used to mill large stock. The wide blade was designed to keep the cut straight in very thick lumber. It was used by the mighty kobiki-shokunin (sawyer). According to the Takenaka Carpentry Tools Museum it was probably produced and used during Japan's Meiji era (1868-1912).

Well, this is what I found at the flee market on Friday, and paid $10 bucks for:









Its in amazing condition. Even the original handle is intact, although warn (it was obviously put to work!) It has a little rust but I will clean it carefully. It has the same blacksmith tool marks as the one that Odate shows. From the little bit of research I've done this saw seems to be over 100 years old!
i hope you don't think this is a dumb question, but would you ever consider trying it out? just to see what its like to try and usera tool like that?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,699 Posts
Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
I'll give you my unsolicited thoughts. I too used this process in a very similar manner. The only difference is that I was told the copper wire should not touch the water. I don't know why or if that is even really required, but I think that it has something to do with the possibility of creating a toxic byproduct. I really don't know.

Anyway, I did notice one thing. It seemed that after a quick bath, it loosens up the rust significantly. A quick scrub with a brass brush takes a lot of rust off fast and then you just rinse it in water and put it back in a again. In theory, it shoudl get rid of ALL the rust. evaporust is good, but so is electrolysis and it should be able to get every last bit off. Great photos. You've got a real beauty there.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top