LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
9,138 Posts
My first Krenov Style Plane

I made my first plane!

I used the blade from one of those old wooden planes I had. As you can see I had a variety of these old planes with different style blades. Straight, concave, and a couple different radii of convex blades:



Here are some progress photos…

Making the Body:

I started out with a block of Koa that I got on our honeymoon in Kauai, Hawaii.



Look, two plane bodies!



I used the width of the blade as a guide to cut my block into slabs.



I am basing my design from instructions in various books from James Krenov. Here I am checking and drawing the angles for the mouth:





And cut them on the bandsaw:



I had to run one of the triangle pieces on my router table to create the space for the screw that holds chip breaker on to the iron.



Making the Pin:

Now, I don't have a lathe. So I had to get creative to make the round ends of the pin. I used a plug cutting bit on my drill press. I think this would be faster and easier than a lathe anyway. This ensures that both ends are the same and I know that they are exactly 1/2" so I can use a 1/2" drill bit to drill the holes.



I finished shaping the pin (rounding over the top) with a chisel.



Finally I glued it up:





Here is the glued up body:



I ran the plane upside-down through my thickness sander to carefully flatten the sole and open the throat until it was just right:



Shaping the body:

I first rough cut the basic shape on the bandsaw:



And after a lot of hand shaping I ended up with this:



The blade:

Sorry, I didn't take photos of the blade shaping process. but I cut the blade and chip breaker shorter, shaped it on the disk sander, and sharpened it on my WorkSharp.

And HERE is the finished project:

Blake a great job. I've got a couple of Kenov's books and always wanted to do that. Someday I hope.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
9,138 Posts
Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
Blake great job on the clean-up.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
9,138 Posts
100+ year old Disston Backsaw ...RESTORED

After some help from fellow Lumberjocks and a little research (here), I determined that this beautiful old backsaw is about a hundred years old (give or take).

"Before" photos:







After:

I carefully took apart old saw and put the blade through the electrolysis process. Then I stripped the handle (which was covered in layers of paint and dripped varnish)... and applied Shellac. I also polished the brass. This is the result:

DSC_6665

DSC_6656

DSC_6658

On a side note… Here's a little shop humor for you:

DSC_6671

DSC_6675

I also just finished a chest of drawers for my workbench. So all of my favorite hand tools have a really nice home now:



Happy woodworking everyone!
Very nice restoration.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top