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Electrolysis on the Stanley No. 62

I always wanted to try electrolysis rust removal and it is just as simple and effective as they claim.

Note: This is not a full tutorial on electrolysis. You must research the many other resources on the internet before attempting this your self. IT CAN BE DEADLY AND ILLEGAL IF DONE WRONG.

This is the old Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane that needed to be de-rusted:

P1010001

Here it is in pieces:

Electrolysis

And here are a couple "before" photos of the body:

Electrolysis (1)

Electrolysis (3)

Here's my electrolysis bucket set-up. Six pieces of rebar are secured to the top edge of the bucket with bailing wire and then connected with copper wire to form one continuous sacrificial electrode.

Electrolysis (4)

"Washing Soda" was the stuff they said to mix into the water as an electrolyte:

Electrolysis (6)

The plane parts are suspended from copper wire which gets connected together on top:

Electrolysis (5)

And wa-lah:

Electro 001

When its working right you should see millions of tiny hydrogen bubbles rising from the tool (its hard to tell in this photo)...

Electro 002

When it first comes out it looks pretty bad. It makes you wonder if you did something backwards because your tools will be covered in a thick rust sludge:

Electro 003

But after some scrubbing with steel wool it starts to look pretty good:

Electro 004

And here is the final result:

Electro 005

Electro 007

Electro 018

One side had some pitting but the rest looked ok:

Electro 014

The sole was in excellent condition:

Electro 017

I still need to sharpen the blade, lap the sole, and repair the knob and tote.
huh - very interesting
 

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Stanley No. 62 Restored, Bench Finished!

Stanley No. 62

After putting the Stanley No. 62 low angle jack plane through electrolysis still had quite a bit of work to do. Here is a "before photo" as a reminder:

P1010005

In my last post WayneC commented:
I would seal the japanned area using a clear schallac. This will prevent further rust. 3 in 1 oil on the adjustment screw. On the knobs they look repairable to me. Glue and refinish. Given the value of this plane, I would keep the original knobs. I would use a good paste wax on the rest of the metal parts.

Well thats exactly what I did (Thanks Wayne). The Shellac looked great on the old Japanning. Even though it wasn't all there it re-emphasized whats left of it.

And I did decide to repair and refinish the tote and knob and they came out great. The tote was broken in two places (three pieces). So I drilled three holes up through it and drove 2 1/2" finish nails into the holes to reinforce the epoxied joints. Then I stripped the old finish off and applied thee coats of Shellac.

Anyway, here is the finished result:

DSC_6481

DSC_6482

DSC_6483

Woodworking Bench

I also finished my bench! Sorry, I didn't take any more progress photos toward the end. But since the last blog I basically just drilled the 3/4" dog holes, made vice handles, and finished the top with Danish Oil and Wax. Here is the finished project:



Now its time to put it all together and make some shavings!
Wow that sure cames out great
 

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100+ year old Disston Backsaw ...RESTORED

After some help from fellow Lumberjocks and a little research (here), I determined that this beautiful old backsaw is about a hundred years old (give or take).

"Before" photos:







After:

I carefully took apart old saw and put the blade through the electrolysis process. Then I stripped the handle (which was covered in layers of paint and dripped varnish)... and applied Shellac. I also polished the brass. This is the result:

DSC_6665

DSC_6656

DSC_6658

On a side note… Here's a little shop humor for you:

DSC_6671

DSC_6675

I also just finished a chest of drawers for my workbench. So all of my favorite hand tools have a really nice home now:



Happy woodworking everyone!
Very nice
 
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