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Tote Making Process pictorial!

Here is a pictorial process that I go through to make Stanley sized totes. Any questions are welcome!
















I've been meaning to do this for the two I need to restore. Nice pictorial, and nice totes! Where did you get that blueprint from? I checked Lee Valley's site but didn't seem to find it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Tote Making Process pictorial!

Here is a pictorial process that I go through to make Stanley sized totes. Any questions are welcome!
















I downloaded a bunch from the LV site. I found them through google images . Make sure to select "none" for page scaling on the print prompt. Alot of the time this is set to "reduce to printer margins"

for #2's
http://www.leevalley.com/html/16j4010j.pdf

for #3-4's
http://www.leevalley.com/html/16j4010k.pdf

for #5 and above
http://www.leevalley.com/html/16j4010l.pdf

veritas totes:

http://www.leevalley.com/html/16j4010c.pdf
http://www.leevalley.com/html/16j4010d.pdf
http://www.leevalley.com/html/16j4010g.pdf

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Restoring is addictive

I guess this is kind of a venting process. Ive recently restored a few Bailey's (#3 and 2-4's) and its getting addictive. Ive cleaned some and Ive tuned some but putting a fresh coat of paint, polishing the brass, and refurbing the totes and knobs is very rewarding. Ive accumulated more baileys than I need, but when I see one I want to make it shine again(hopefuly better). Amongst other hand plane stuff I am "refurbing" my 4's. ended up with a union in the deal, and I must say its one of the most interesting I have ( has the 2nd stanley type frog/reciever and a really thick blade). Ill start with some before and afters ive done then show my Electrolysis setup to show the process/progress. BTW, I used Epoxy enamel for my paint( this will be shown later on)
Also, I take all precautions with the electrolysis process I can think of. Setting it to low and letting it work its magic for a day seems to work. Also, I "shield" the anode and cathode with plastic paint screens just as an overprecaution.

Notes(its late, so please excuse the irratic ):
I use pliable wire attached to alligator clips for my derustification ( negative lead attached to planes) the Postitive ( rust collectors peek out of the water and rest on the edge. Have some more rust collecting metal on the end that is submerged.
I go through a few stages of electrolysis and paint stripping- to get it down to the metal. And I put them in whole (minus tote/knob) on the first go around. After that its scrub city to remove the oxidation( byproduct)
I use evaporust to keep the cast iron from flash rusting. This seems to happen within an hour
I strip the nickle off if it looks pretty bad, them sand/ polish the cast iron lever( I actually prefer the look vs. peeling nickle)
If the totes are rosewood and look cruddy but not broken, the buffing wheel does wonders.
Painted totes can look good with about 20 coats of enamel (3rd pic w/black)
The 3 has some war production characteristics the first 4 is probably pre war and the second 4 is just post war I believe.

DANGER! Electrolysis is easy, but make sure to learn all about the risks and dangers, there are enough! Please understand this would be a very incomplete guide on Electolysis.

And off we go:















 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Restoring is addictive

I guess this is kind of a venting process. Ive recently restored a few Bailey's (#3 and 2-4's) and its getting addictive. Ive cleaned some and Ive tuned some but putting a fresh coat of paint, polishing the brass, and refurbing the totes and knobs is very rewarding. Ive accumulated more baileys than I need, but when I see one I want to make it shine again(hopefuly better). Amongst other hand plane stuff I am "refurbing" my 4's. ended up with a union in the deal, and I must say its one of the most interesting I have ( has the 2nd stanley type frog/reciever and a really thick blade). Ill start with some before and afters ive done then show my Electrolysis setup to show the process/progress. BTW, I used Epoxy enamel for my paint( this will be shown later on)
Also, I take all precautions with the electrolysis process I can think of. Setting it to low and letting it work its magic for a day seems to work. Also, I "shield" the anode and cathode with plastic paint screens just as an overprecaution.

Notes(its late, so please excuse the irratic ):
I use pliable wire attached to alligator clips for my derustification ( negative lead attached to planes) the Postitive ( rust collectors peek out of the water and rest on the edge. Have some more rust collecting metal on the end that is submerged.
I go through a few stages of electrolysis and paint stripping- to get it down to the metal. And I put them in whole (minus tote/knob) on the first go around. After that its scrub city to remove the oxidation( byproduct)
I use evaporust to keep the cast iron from flash rusting. This seems to happen within an hour
I strip the nickle off if it looks pretty bad, them sand/ polish the cast iron lever( I actually prefer the look vs. peeling nickle)
If the totes are rosewood and look cruddy but not broken, the buffing wheel does wonders.
Painted totes can look good with about 20 coats of enamel (3rd pic w/black)
The 3 has some war production characteristics the first 4 is probably pre war and the second 4 is just post war I believe.

DANGER! Electrolysis is easy, but make sure to learn all about the risks and dangers, there are enough! Please understand this would be a very incomplete guide on Electolysis.

And off we go:















BTW washing soda is easilly found at the super market( havn't found it at wal mart tho)
Bubbles are good!
Had to throw a brass knob on the 3 it was a hard rubber type (I had a spare)
 

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Restoring is addictive

I guess this is kind of a venting process. Ive recently restored a few Bailey's (#3 and 2-4's) and its getting addictive. Ive cleaned some and Ive tuned some but putting a fresh coat of paint, polishing the brass, and refurbing the totes and knobs is very rewarding. Ive accumulated more baileys than I need, but when I see one I want to make it shine again(hopefuly better). Amongst other hand plane stuff I am "refurbing" my 4's. ended up with a union in the deal, and I must say its one of the most interesting I have ( has the 2nd stanley type frog/reciever and a really thick blade). Ill start with some before and afters ive done then show my Electrolysis setup to show the process/progress. BTW, I used Epoxy enamel for my paint( this will be shown later on)
Also, I take all precautions with the electrolysis process I can think of. Setting it to low and letting it work its magic for a day seems to work. Also, I "shield" the anode and cathode with plastic paint screens just as an overprecaution.

Notes(its late, so please excuse the irratic ):
I use pliable wire attached to alligator clips for my derustification ( negative lead attached to planes) the Postitive ( rust collectors peek out of the water and rest on the edge. Have some more rust collecting metal on the end that is submerged.
I go through a few stages of electrolysis and paint stripping- to get it down to the metal. And I put them in whole (minus tote/knob) on the first go around. After that its scrub city to remove the oxidation( byproduct)
I use evaporust to keep the cast iron from flash rusting. This seems to happen within an hour
I strip the nickle off if it looks pretty bad, them sand/ polish the cast iron lever( I actually prefer the look vs. peeling nickle)
If the totes are rosewood and look cruddy but not broken, the buffing wheel does wonders.
Painted totes can look good with about 20 coats of enamel (3rd pic w/black)
The 3 has some war production characteristics the first 4 is probably pre war and the second 4 is just post war I believe.

DANGER! Electrolysis is easy, but make sure to learn all about the risks and dangers, there are enough! Please understand this would be a very incomplete guide on Electolysis.

And off we go:















nice job, keep it up
 

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Restoring is addictive

I guess this is kind of a venting process. Ive recently restored a few Bailey's (#3 and 2-4's) and its getting addictive. Ive cleaned some and Ive tuned some but putting a fresh coat of paint, polishing the brass, and refurbing the totes and knobs is very rewarding. Ive accumulated more baileys than I need, but when I see one I want to make it shine again(hopefuly better). Amongst other hand plane stuff I am "refurbing" my 4's. ended up with a union in the deal, and I must say its one of the most interesting I have ( has the 2nd stanley type frog/reciever and a really thick blade). Ill start with some before and afters ive done then show my Electrolysis setup to show the process/progress. BTW, I used Epoxy enamel for my paint( this will be shown later on)
Also, I take all precautions with the electrolysis process I can think of. Setting it to low and letting it work its magic for a day seems to work. Also, I "shield" the anode and cathode with plastic paint screens just as an overprecaution.

Notes(its late, so please excuse the irratic ):
I use pliable wire attached to alligator clips for my derustification ( negative lead attached to planes) the Postitive ( rust collectors peek out of the water and rest on the edge. Have some more rust collecting metal on the end that is submerged.
I go through a few stages of electrolysis and paint stripping- to get it down to the metal. And I put them in whole (minus tote/knob) on the first go around. After that its scrub city to remove the oxidation( byproduct)
I use evaporust to keep the cast iron from flash rusting. This seems to happen within an hour
I strip the nickle off if it looks pretty bad, them sand/ polish the cast iron lever( I actually prefer the look vs. peeling nickle)
If the totes are rosewood and look cruddy but not broken, the buffing wheel does wonders.
Painted totes can look good with about 20 coats of enamel (3rd pic w/black)
The 3 has some war production characteristics the first 4 is probably pre war and the second 4 is just post war I believe.

DANGER! Electrolysis is easy, but make sure to learn all about the risks and dangers, there are enough! Please understand this would be a very incomplete guide on Electolysis.

And off we go:















Your doing a Great Job! I can see why it has become addictive. They Look great.
 

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Restoring is addictive

I guess this is kind of a venting process. Ive recently restored a few Bailey's (#3 and 2-4's) and its getting addictive. Ive cleaned some and Ive tuned some but putting a fresh coat of paint, polishing the brass, and refurbing the totes and knobs is very rewarding. Ive accumulated more baileys than I need, but when I see one I want to make it shine again(hopefuly better). Amongst other hand plane stuff I am "refurbing" my 4's. ended up with a union in the deal, and I must say its one of the most interesting I have ( has the 2nd stanley type frog/reciever and a really thick blade). Ill start with some before and afters ive done then show my Electrolysis setup to show the process/progress. BTW, I used Epoxy enamel for my paint( this will be shown later on)
Also, I take all precautions with the electrolysis process I can think of. Setting it to low and letting it work its magic for a day seems to work. Also, I "shield" the anode and cathode with plastic paint screens just as an overprecaution.

Notes(its late, so please excuse the irratic ):
I use pliable wire attached to alligator clips for my derustification ( negative lead attached to planes) the Postitive ( rust collectors peek out of the water and rest on the edge. Have some more rust collecting metal on the end that is submerged.
I go through a few stages of electrolysis and paint stripping- to get it down to the metal. And I put them in whole (minus tote/knob) on the first go around. After that its scrub city to remove the oxidation( byproduct)
I use evaporust to keep the cast iron from flash rusting. This seems to happen within an hour
I strip the nickle off if it looks pretty bad, them sand/ polish the cast iron lever( I actually prefer the look vs. peeling nickle)
If the totes are rosewood and look cruddy but not broken, the buffing wheel does wonders.
Painted totes can look good with about 20 coats of enamel (3rd pic w/black)
The 3 has some war production characteristics the first 4 is probably pre war and the second 4 is just post war I believe.

DANGER! Electrolysis is easy, but make sure to learn all about the risks and dangers, there are enough! Please understand this would be a very incomplete guide on Electolysis.

And off we go:















Nice work. The old "girls" still have a lot of useful life in them.
 

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Restoring is addictive

I guess this is kind of a venting process. Ive recently restored a few Bailey's (#3 and 2-4's) and its getting addictive. Ive cleaned some and Ive tuned some but putting a fresh coat of paint, polishing the brass, and refurbing the totes and knobs is very rewarding. Ive accumulated more baileys than I need, but when I see one I want to make it shine again(hopefuly better). Amongst other hand plane stuff I am "refurbing" my 4's. ended up with a union in the deal, and I must say its one of the most interesting I have ( has the 2nd stanley type frog/reciever and a really thick blade). Ill start with some before and afters ive done then show my Electrolysis setup to show the process/progress. BTW, I used Epoxy enamel for my paint( this will be shown later on)
Also, I take all precautions with the electrolysis process I can think of. Setting it to low and letting it work its magic for a day seems to work. Also, I "shield" the anode and cathode with plastic paint screens just as an overprecaution.

Notes(its late, so please excuse the irratic ):
I use pliable wire attached to alligator clips for my derustification ( negative lead attached to planes) the Postitive ( rust collectors peek out of the water and rest on the edge. Have some more rust collecting metal on the end that is submerged.
I go through a few stages of electrolysis and paint stripping- to get it down to the metal. And I put them in whole (minus tote/knob) on the first go around. After that its scrub city to remove the oxidation( byproduct)
I use evaporust to keep the cast iron from flash rusting. This seems to happen within an hour
I strip the nickle off if it looks pretty bad, them sand/ polish the cast iron lever( I actually prefer the look vs. peeling nickle)
If the totes are rosewood and look cruddy but not broken, the buffing wheel does wonders.
Painted totes can look good with about 20 coats of enamel (3rd pic w/black)
The 3 has some war production characteristics the first 4 is probably pre war and the second 4 is just post war I believe.

DANGER! Electrolysis is easy, but make sure to learn all about the risks and dangers, there are enough! Please understand this would be a very incomplete guide on Electolysis.

And off we go:















Great job
I get my washing Soda at ace hardware.
 

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Restoring is addictive

I guess this is kind of a venting process. Ive recently restored a few Bailey's (#3 and 2-4's) and its getting addictive. Ive cleaned some and Ive tuned some but putting a fresh coat of paint, polishing the brass, and refurbing the totes and knobs is very rewarding. Ive accumulated more baileys than I need, but when I see one I want to make it shine again(hopefuly better). Amongst other hand plane stuff I am "refurbing" my 4's. ended up with a union in the deal, and I must say its one of the most interesting I have ( has the 2nd stanley type frog/reciever and a really thick blade). Ill start with some before and afters ive done then show my Electrolysis setup to show the process/progress. BTW, I used Epoxy enamel for my paint( this will be shown later on)
Also, I take all precautions with the electrolysis process I can think of. Setting it to low and letting it work its magic for a day seems to work. Also, I "shield" the anode and cathode with plastic paint screens just as an overprecaution.

Notes(its late, so please excuse the irratic ):
I use pliable wire attached to alligator clips for my derustification ( negative lead attached to planes) the Postitive ( rust collectors peek out of the water and rest on the edge. Have some more rust collecting metal on the end that is submerged.
I go through a few stages of electrolysis and paint stripping- to get it down to the metal. And I put them in whole (minus tote/knob) on the first go around. After that its scrub city to remove the oxidation( byproduct)
I use evaporust to keep the cast iron from flash rusting. This seems to happen within an hour
I strip the nickle off if it looks pretty bad, them sand/ polish the cast iron lever( I actually prefer the look vs. peeling nickle)
If the totes are rosewood and look cruddy but not broken, the buffing wheel does wonders.
Painted totes can look good with about 20 coats of enamel (3rd pic w/black)
The 3 has some war production characteristics the first 4 is probably pre war and the second 4 is just post war I believe.

DANGER! Electrolysis is easy, but make sure to learn all about the risks and dangers, there are enough! Please understand this would be a very incomplete guide on Electolysis.

And off we go:















What kind of current did you hook up to it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Restoring is addictive

I guess this is kind of a venting process. Ive recently restored a few Bailey's (#3 and 2-4's) and its getting addictive. Ive cleaned some and Ive tuned some but putting a fresh coat of paint, polishing the brass, and refurbing the totes and knobs is very rewarding. Ive accumulated more baileys than I need, but when I see one I want to make it shine again(hopefuly better). Amongst other hand plane stuff I am "refurbing" my 4's. ended up with a union in the deal, and I must say its one of the most interesting I have ( has the 2nd stanley type frog/reciever and a really thick blade). Ill start with some before and afters ive done then show my Electrolysis setup to show the process/progress. BTW, I used Epoxy enamel for my paint( this will be shown later on)
Also, I take all precautions with the electrolysis process I can think of. Setting it to low and letting it work its magic for a day seems to work. Also, I "shield" the anode and cathode with plastic paint screens just as an overprecaution.

Notes(its late, so please excuse the irratic ):
I use pliable wire attached to alligator clips for my derustification ( negative lead attached to planes) the Postitive ( rust collectors peek out of the water and rest on the edge. Have some more rust collecting metal on the end that is submerged.
I go through a few stages of electrolysis and paint stripping- to get it down to the metal. And I put them in whole (minus tote/knob) on the first go around. After that its scrub city to remove the oxidation( byproduct)
I use evaporust to keep the cast iron from flash rusting. This seems to happen within an hour
I strip the nickle off if it looks pretty bad, them sand/ polish the cast iron lever( I actually prefer the look vs. peeling nickle)
If the totes are rosewood and look cruddy but not broken, the buffing wheel does wonders.
Painted totes can look good with about 20 coats of enamel (3rd pic w/black)
The 3 has some war production characteristics the first 4 is probably pre war and the second 4 is just post war I believe.

DANGER! Electrolysis is easy, but make sure to learn all about the risks and dangers, there are enough! Please understand this would be a very incomplete guide on Electolysis.

And off we go:















I have a battery charger with a few option on it. They all work, but I set it to 2Amps 12 volts. 6 amps works more aggressivly and works well. I have found that if the positive( rust collecting metal) and negative(the rusty planes)are closer to each other the whole reaction works fine with the 2A 12V setting. That is my I use the painters screen to help make sure there is no contact ( just make sure nothing pokes through). Also, they are cheap($.50 each) , and they make hooking everything up easier than having to hang and suspend the stuff in the container. Also, It is pretty easy to clean the rust collecting pieces because they are flat, so a quick scrub and they are ready to go again. Sorry for the long winded answer, forfot to mention some of this. Hope it helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
painting and progress

Here are some updated pics of my process. I am doing a bunch now and it is a little pretty labor intensive , but well worth it. Have alot of extra time this weekend, so I decided to do my 5's as well. Progress is pretty good. Now, time to relaxand let dry!

Some notes:

-I would have taken pictures of taping and masking, but I couldn't find my camera charger. Anyways, it is pretty straightfoward; tape everything that wasn't painted.

-Also, I roll up pieces of paper towel in a ball and put them into the screw holes.

- as far as taping the sides, I don't, because I like to lap them after they are put back together, due to blade tention and such, I think this is best. Also, thet get little overspray during the painting process, so no biggie.
- I will be letting this paint dry for a week or more (suggested cure time-7days) this is epoxy enamel, satin. I am debating on putting a light coat of wax on the shoes to deter wood dust and such, any suggestions?

Well, hopefully you can make up my painting set up. It is basically a box fan pointed outward into an old cushionwith drop cloth all around, and under a fold up table. There is a vaccume bag taped to the back of the fan which sucks up alot of the overspray and residuals of the paint. This setup is a little "red/green", but it seems to work pretty well. -please tell me someone has seen the red/ green show-

I find that nothing works as good as kleen strip paint remover on the jappaning. I wasted money on the orange stuff, which does smell great, but dosen't preform well on jappaning.

I have a system of painting the adjustment levers, which could be improved, because I ended up painting my fingers alot. I basically wittle some dowels and stick them on , epoxy, and then hang them . Maybe I should use longer dowels to relieve the painted fingers….hmm….

Included is my orginization system, which consists of boxes with the contents of the original planes parts. Also, every step is done in sequence. I basically keep the shoes and frogs in the same order whenever I do anything to them. This goes for everything else. I will make changes like a brass knob for a steel one. I have a spares box on my table.

Right now I am working on 1-3, 5-4's and 4-5's , I am also in the earlier process of doing 2-6's and 2-7's, unfortunatly, on these last 4, 2 need frogs and 3 need lever caps , and the 6's and 7's I have are type 11-13's so these parts are costly and more rare. Hopefully I can ebay some of these to get the necessary parts.

I am happy to answer any questions .

-Thanks for checking this out, here are the pics:








 

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118,619 Posts
painting and progress

Here are some updated pics of my process. I am doing a bunch now and it is a little pretty labor intensive , but well worth it. Have alot of extra time this weekend, so I decided to do my 5's as well. Progress is pretty good. Now, time to relaxand let dry!

Some notes:

-I would have taken pictures of taping and masking, but I couldn't find my camera charger. Anyways, it is pretty straightfoward; tape everything that wasn't painted.

-Also, I roll up pieces of paper towel in a ball and put them into the screw holes.

- as far as taping the sides, I don't, because I like to lap them after they are put back together, due to blade tention and such, I think this is best. Also, thet get little overspray during the painting process, so no biggie.
- I will be letting this paint dry for a week or more (suggested cure time-7days) this is epoxy enamel, satin. I am debating on putting a light coat of wax on the shoes to deter wood dust and such, any suggestions?

Well, hopefully you can make up my painting set up. It is basically a box fan pointed outward into an old cushionwith drop cloth all around, and under a fold up table. There is a vaccume bag taped to the back of the fan which sucks up alot of the overspray and residuals of the paint. This setup is a little "red/green", but it seems to work pretty well. -please tell me someone has seen the red/ green show-

I find that nothing works as good as kleen strip paint remover on the jappaning. I wasted money on the orange stuff, which does smell great, but dosen't preform well on jappaning.

I have a system of painting the adjustment levers, which could be improved, because I ended up painting my fingers alot. I basically wittle some dowels and stick them on , epoxy, and then hang them . Maybe I should use longer dowels to relieve the painted fingers….hmm….

Included is my orginization system, which consists of boxes with the contents of the original planes parts. Also, every step is done in sequence. I basically keep the shoes and frogs in the same order whenever I do anything to them. This goes for everything else. I will make changes like a brass knob for a steel one. I have a spares box on my table.

Right now I am working on 1-3, 5-4's and 4-5's , I am also in the earlier process of doing 2-6's and 2-7's, unfortunatly, on these last 4, 2 need frogs and 3 need lever caps , and the 6's and 7's I have are type 11-13's so these parts are costly and more rare. Hopefully I can ebay some of these to get the necessary parts.

I am happy to answer any questions .

-Thanks for checking this out, here are the pics:








I was wondering about the same thing tom put so well. Your planes look great. I'm I understanding you right that your taking this aproach on a #1 stanley?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
painting and progress

Here are some updated pics of my process. I am doing a bunch now and it is a little pretty labor intensive , but well worth it. Have alot of extra time this weekend, so I decided to do my 5's as well. Progress is pretty good. Now, time to relaxand let dry!

Some notes:

-I would have taken pictures of taping and masking, but I couldn't find my camera charger. Anyways, it is pretty straightfoward; tape everything that wasn't painted.

-Also, I roll up pieces of paper towel in a ball and put them into the screw holes.

- as far as taping the sides, I don't, because I like to lap them after they are put back together, due to blade tention and such, I think this is best. Also, thet get little overspray during the painting process, so no biggie.
- I will be letting this paint dry for a week or more (suggested cure time-7days) this is epoxy enamel, satin. I am debating on putting a light coat of wax on the shoes to deter wood dust and such, any suggestions?

Well, hopefully you can make up my painting set up. It is basically a box fan pointed outward into an old cushionwith drop cloth all around, and under a fold up table. There is a vaccume bag taped to the back of the fan which sucks up alot of the overspray and residuals of the paint. This setup is a little "red/green", but it seems to work pretty well. -please tell me someone has seen the red/ green show-

I find that nothing works as good as kleen strip paint remover on the jappaning. I wasted money on the orange stuff, which does smell great, but dosen't preform well on jappaning.

I have a system of painting the adjustment levers, which could be improved, because I ended up painting my fingers alot. I basically wittle some dowels and stick them on , epoxy, and then hang them . Maybe I should use longer dowels to relieve the painted fingers….hmm….

Included is my orginization system, which consists of boxes with the contents of the original planes parts. Also, every step is done in sequence. I basically keep the shoes and frogs in the same order whenever I do anything to them. This goes for everything else. I will make changes like a brass knob for a steel one. I have a spares box on my table.

Right now I am working on 1-3, 5-4's and 4-5's , I am also in the earlier process of doing 2-6's and 2-7's, unfortunatly, on these last 4, 2 need frogs and 3 need lever caps , and the 6's and 7's I have are type 11-13's so these parts are costly and more rare. Hopefully I can ebay some of these to get the necessary parts.

I am happy to answer any questions .

-Thanks for checking this out, here are the pics:








I don't know if I'd do this on #1 stanley or a #2 for that matter. Plus I don't think I could afford either. It is kinda hard to word what Ive got with the numbers and such.
As of now I have :
-five # 4's (including a very old union-excited to try)
-One # 3
-and four #5's
-Also I have two 6's and two 7's ( one of each is corrigated)
- I read that number 1's and 2's are usually in decient shape because they get little use over their lives.

Thanks for the heads up on the venting and fume issue with the box fan. I will definatly revamp my setup. I have some induction motors and busted shop vac that could come in handy.
 

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118,619 Posts
painting and progress

Here are some updated pics of my process. I am doing a bunch now and it is a little pretty labor intensive , but well worth it. Have alot of extra time this weekend, so I decided to do my 5's as well. Progress is pretty good. Now, time to relaxand let dry!

Some notes:

-I would have taken pictures of taping and masking, but I couldn't find my camera charger. Anyways, it is pretty straightfoward; tape everything that wasn't painted.

-Also, I roll up pieces of paper towel in a ball and put them into the screw holes.

- as far as taping the sides, I don't, because I like to lap them after they are put back together, due to blade tention and such, I think this is best. Also, thet get little overspray during the painting process, so no biggie.
- I will be letting this paint dry for a week or more (suggested cure time-7days) this is epoxy enamel, satin. I am debating on putting a light coat of wax on the shoes to deter wood dust and such, any suggestions?

Well, hopefully you can make up my painting set up. It is basically a box fan pointed outward into an old cushionwith drop cloth all around, and under a fold up table. There is a vaccume bag taped to the back of the fan which sucks up alot of the overspray and residuals of the paint. This setup is a little "red/green", but it seems to work pretty well. -please tell me someone has seen the red/ green show-

I find that nothing works as good as kleen strip paint remover on the jappaning. I wasted money on the orange stuff, which does smell great, but dosen't preform well on jappaning.

I have a system of painting the adjustment levers, which could be improved, because I ended up painting my fingers alot. I basically wittle some dowels and stick them on , epoxy, and then hang them . Maybe I should use longer dowels to relieve the painted fingers….hmm….

Included is my orginization system, which consists of boxes with the contents of the original planes parts. Also, every step is done in sequence. I basically keep the shoes and frogs in the same order whenever I do anything to them. This goes for everything else. I will make changes like a brass knob for a steel one. I have a spares box on my table.

Right now I am working on 1-3, 5-4's and 4-5's , I am also in the earlier process of doing 2-6's and 2-7's, unfortunatly, on these last 4, 2 need frogs and 3 need lever caps , and the 6's and 7's I have are type 11-13's so these parts are costly and more rare. Hopefully I can ebay some of these to get the necessary parts.

I am happy to answer any questions .

-Thanks for checking this out, here are the pics:








That's good what your doing looks great but it would hurt the value of the #1 or #2
 
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