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I just watched this video:

I was extremely interested in it. Especially how he chose to flatten the sole. Every other video and post and website I've been to simply recommends putting varying grits of sandpaper on glass or stone and sanding it flat. I kind of really like the process he uses, in that he has at least 5 contact points on the sole at any given spot.

His video lead me to this one about hand scraping and flaking, which really clarified the process for me:

Has anyone else ever done this? I thought it was so weird at first, because I think we all have that image of a perfectly square plane, immaculately polished, with a river of shavings just flowing out of it.

But the more I think about it, the more a hand scraped surface makes sense to me. From a precision standpoint at least. I may end up trying this on some of the broken/harbor freight planes I have… Just to see what happens.

Thoughts?
 

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There's a machinist or at least a guy with a lot of metalworking experience that comments here once in a while about scraping. Apparently it is the way to get higher tolerances. For woodworking it's not really necessary since woodworking has been done with wooden planes that aren't that accurately flat for centuries. But don't let that stop you learning to hand scrape for the fun of it. Apparently it can help the performance of a plane especially smoothers that are designed to take fine shavings. I think it would be fun to try someday too.
 

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The video is a wonderful practice video for scraping. As far as the plane? It is a total waste of time. His explanation of the plane being in "useless" condition is nonsense. The sides not being parallel makes it not able to use for shooting? There is a real handy lever to adjust the blade. Only having contact at the mouth and the end of the plane? The Japanese use a special plane to hollow the base of the plane to make it do that on purpose.
 
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