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Discussion Starter · #81 ·
CAD Templates and Pattern Sanding Test

With the new bandsaw tuned up and cutting nicely I got to work designing the templates needed to make the chairs. I worked through the steps to make each part, designing pattern routing/sanding templates to aid each step. Each part has several templates to be used to route the shape, mortises, etc.

Rectangle Azure Mesh Aqua Material property


I ended up with 46 templates overall, a lot more than I expected. I sent the files off to the local CNC shop for quoting.

While waiting for my templates I decided to test out my pattern sanding rub collar using a template for the back seat rail.

Rectangle Wood Office ruler Font Ruler


Starting with a sapele scrap, I traced a portion of the full size pattern and headed to the bandsaw.

Wood Automotive design Chair Vehicle door Automotive exterior


After rough cutting just outside the line, I attached the template to the part with double sided tape. The rub collar requires an offset of 1/4", which I designed into each CNC template. For this test, I just used the full size template and set it back about 1/4". After a little time at the sander, I had a finished part that matched the template exactly.

Wood Finger Ruler Rectangle Wood stain


Satisfied that my pattern sanding technique will work, I placed an order for a load of quarter sawn Sapele. Working in AutoCAD, I determined that I could get all of the components for a chair from a single 8/4 board as long as it is at least 9" wide and 10' long. This required a special order from my hardwood supplier, who agreed to bring in some wood for me to pick through.

Next Steps: Pick up the sapele when it arrives and get my CNC templates on order.
I d be interested what the quote is for templates at a CNC shop. Pretty reasonable I would bet, so long as your program is compatible with theirs.

Great stuff.

- pintodeluxe
I expect you are right. They had no trouble working from the AutoCAD files I supplied last time for the table. I imagine this will be the same.
 

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CAD Templates and Pattern Sanding Test

With the new bandsaw tuned up and cutting nicely I got to work designing the templates needed to make the chairs. I worked through the steps to make each part, designing pattern routing/sanding templates to aid each step. Each part has several templates to be used to route the shape, mortises, etc.

Rectangle Azure Mesh Aqua Material property


I ended up with 46 templates overall, a lot more than I expected. I sent the files off to the local CNC shop for quoting.

While waiting for my templates I decided to test out my pattern sanding rub collar using a template for the back seat rail.

Rectangle Wood Office ruler Font Ruler


Starting with a sapele scrap, I traced a portion of the full size pattern and headed to the bandsaw.

Wood Automotive design Chair Vehicle door Automotive exterior


After rough cutting just outside the line, I attached the template to the part with double sided tape. The rub collar requires an offset of 1/4", which I designed into each CNC template. For this test, I just used the full size template and set it back about 1/4". After a little time at the sander, I had a finished part that matched the template exactly.

Wood Finger Ruler Rectangle Wood stain


Satisfied that my pattern sanding technique will work, I placed an order for a load of quarter sawn Sapele. Working in AutoCAD, I determined that I could get all of the components for a chair from a single 8/4 board as long as it is at least 9" wide and 10' long. This required a special order from my hardwood supplier, who agreed to bring in some wood for me to pick through.

Next Steps: Pick up the sapele when it arrives and get my CNC templates on order.
I like watching your processes!
I've got a table (perhaps TWO) and set of dining room chairs in my future… so this is really fun to watch and learn.
 

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CAD Templates and Pattern Sanding Test

With the new bandsaw tuned up and cutting nicely I got to work designing the templates needed to make the chairs. I worked through the steps to make each part, designing pattern routing/sanding templates to aid each step. Each part has several templates to be used to route the shape, mortises, etc.

Rectangle Azure Mesh Aqua Material property


I ended up with 46 templates overall, a lot more than I expected. I sent the files off to the local CNC shop for quoting.

While waiting for my templates I decided to test out my pattern sanding rub collar using a template for the back seat rail.

Rectangle Wood Office ruler Font Ruler


Starting with a sapele scrap, I traced a portion of the full size pattern and headed to the bandsaw.

Wood Automotive design Chair Vehicle door Automotive exterior


After rough cutting just outside the line, I attached the template to the part with double sided tape. The rub collar requires an offset of 1/4", which I designed into each CNC template. For this test, I just used the full size template and set it back about 1/4". After a little time at the sander, I had a finished part that matched the template exactly.

Wood Finger Ruler Rectangle Wood stain


Satisfied that my pattern sanding technique will work, I placed an order for a load of quarter sawn Sapele. Working in AutoCAD, I determined that I could get all of the components for a chair from a single 8/4 board as long as it is at least 9" wide and 10' long. This required a special order from my hardwood supplier, who agreed to bring in some wood for me to pick through.

Next Steps: Pick up the sapele when it arrives and get my CNC templates on order.
Man that's a lot of templates…............!

Looking forward to seeing them in action!
 

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Discussion Starter · #84 ·
CAD Templates and Pattern Sanding Test

With the new bandsaw tuned up and cutting nicely I got to work designing the templates needed to make the chairs. I worked through the steps to make each part, designing pattern routing/sanding templates to aid each step. Each part has several templates to be used to route the shape, mortises, etc.

Rectangle Azure Mesh Aqua Material property


I ended up with 46 templates overall, a lot more than I expected. I sent the files off to the local CNC shop for quoting.

While waiting for my templates I decided to test out my pattern sanding rub collar using a template for the back seat rail.

Rectangle Wood Office ruler Font Ruler


Starting with a sapele scrap, I traced a portion of the full size pattern and headed to the bandsaw.

Wood Automotive design Chair Vehicle door Automotive exterior


After rough cutting just outside the line, I attached the template to the part with double sided tape. The rub collar requires an offset of 1/4", which I designed into each CNC template. For this test, I just used the full size template and set it back about 1/4". After a little time at the sander, I had a finished part that matched the template exactly.

Wood Finger Ruler Rectangle Wood stain


Satisfied that my pattern sanding technique will work, I placed an order for a load of quarter sawn Sapele. Working in AutoCAD, I determined that I could get all of the components for a chair from a single 8/4 board as long as it is at least 9" wide and 10' long. This required a special order from my hardwood supplier, who agreed to bring in some wood for me to pick through.

Next Steps: Pick up the sapele when it arrives and get my CNC templates on order.
I d be interested what the quote is for templates at a CNC shop. Pretty reasonable I would bet, so long as your program is compatible with theirs.

Great stuff.

- pintodeluxe
Just got the quote back. $345 for the lot in 1/2" MDF. Hard to justify a new CNC at that price.

And love the Rush lyrics in you sig, Freewill is one of my favorite Rush songs. I think I might have gone with 'and the trees will all get equal by hatchet, axe and saw' myself
 

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CAD Templates and Pattern Sanding Test

With the new bandsaw tuned up and cutting nicely I got to work designing the templates needed to make the chairs. I worked through the steps to make each part, designing pattern routing/sanding templates to aid each step. Each part has several templates to be used to route the shape, mortises, etc.

Rectangle Azure Mesh Aqua Material property


I ended up with 46 templates overall, a lot more than I expected. I sent the files off to the local CNC shop for quoting.

While waiting for my templates I decided to test out my pattern sanding rub collar using a template for the back seat rail.

Rectangle Wood Office ruler Font Ruler


Starting with a sapele scrap, I traced a portion of the full size pattern and headed to the bandsaw.

Wood Automotive design Chair Vehicle door Automotive exterior


After rough cutting just outside the line, I attached the template to the part with double sided tape. The rub collar requires an offset of 1/4", which I designed into each CNC template. For this test, I just used the full size template and set it back about 1/4". After a little time at the sander, I had a finished part that matched the template exactly.

Wood Finger Ruler Rectangle Wood stain


Satisfied that my pattern sanding technique will work, I placed an order for a load of quarter sawn Sapele. Working in AutoCAD, I determined that I could get all of the components for a chair from a single 8/4 board as long as it is at least 9" wide and 10' long. This required a special order from my hardwood supplier, who agreed to bring in some wood for me to pick through.

Next Steps: Pick up the sapele when it arrives and get my CNC templates on order.
TungOil: thanks for all the information. I built tow Gamble House chairs with arms last year. Now building two without arms. Some of your methods are much better than what I did previously. The back splat I used was bent lamination. Very time consuming. Any way to get your CAD file of the templates? Thanks again for posting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #86 ·
A Lumber Mill Run

The Sapele that I ordered arrived at Hearne Hardwoods earlier in the week. I need about 300 bf for this set of chairs. I can get all of the components for a single chair from one 8/4 board as long as it is at least 9" wide and 10' long, so I need at least 12 boards. Ed at Hearne brought in 400 bf of wide 8/4 quarter sawn Sapele for me to select my boards from. The boards are all 16-18 foot lengths, and 10"+ wide.

Forklift truck Wheel Tire Vehicle Automotive tire


At 16 to 18 feet long these boards are too big for my trailer and wood rack. I had the mill cut them to 11 foot lengths for easier transport and handling in the shop. At 11 feet they hang off my utility trailer a bit front and back.

Tire Wheel Vehicle Tread Wood


I also received the quote for the CNC cut templates, a very reasonable $345. The templates will be made from 1/2" MDF and should be ready in about 2-3 weeks.

While I wait for the templates, I will start roughing out my chair parts on the bandsaw.
 

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A Lumber Mill Run

The Sapele that I ordered arrived at Hearne Hardwoods earlier in the week. I need about 300 bf for this set of chairs. I can get all of the components for a single chair from one 8/4 board as long as it is at least 9" wide and 10' long, so I need at least 12 boards. Ed at Hearne brought in 400 bf of wide 8/4 quarter sawn Sapele for me to select my boards from. The boards are all 16-18 foot lengths, and 10"+ wide.

Forklift truck Wheel Tire Vehicle Automotive tire


At 16 to 18 feet long these boards are too big for my trailer and wood rack. I had the mill cut them to 11 foot lengths for easier transport and handling in the shop. At 11 feet they hang off my utility trailer a bit front and back.

Tire Wheel Vehicle Tread Wood


I also received the quote for the CNC cut templates, a very reasonable $345. The templates will be made from 1/2" MDF and should be ready in about 2-3 weeks.

While I wait for the templates, I will start roughing out my chair parts on the bandsaw.
Nice looking load of lumber. I went to the "Wood Store" Saturday, which for me is my kiln out back!

I bet that sapele mills up really nice.
 

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A Lumber Mill Run

The Sapele that I ordered arrived at Hearne Hardwoods earlier in the week. I need about 300 bf for this set of chairs. I can get all of the components for a single chair from one 8/4 board as long as it is at least 9" wide and 10' long, so I need at least 12 boards. Ed at Hearne brought in 400 bf of wide 8/4 quarter sawn Sapele for me to select my boards from. The boards are all 16-18 foot lengths, and 10"+ wide.

Forklift truck Wheel Tire Vehicle Automotive tire


At 16 to 18 feet long these boards are too big for my trailer and wood rack. I had the mill cut them to 11 foot lengths for easier transport and handling in the shop. At 11 feet they hang off my utility trailer a bit front and back.

Tire Wheel Vehicle Tread Wood


I also received the quote for the CNC cut templates, a very reasonable $345. The templates will be made from 1/2" MDF and should be ready in about 2-3 weeks.

While I wait for the templates, I will start roughing out my chair parts on the bandsaw.
I'm green with envy that you live close enough to Hearne Hardwoods that you can drive over there. That is a seriously fat stack of premium wood.
 

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A Lumber Mill Run

The Sapele that I ordered arrived at Hearne Hardwoods earlier in the week. I need about 300 bf for this set of chairs. I can get all of the components for a single chair from one 8/4 board as long as it is at least 9" wide and 10' long, so I need at least 12 boards. Ed at Hearne brought in 400 bf of wide 8/4 quarter sawn Sapele for me to select my boards from. The boards are all 16-18 foot lengths, and 10"+ wide.

Forklift truck Wheel Tire Vehicle Automotive tire


At 16 to 18 feet long these boards are too big for my trailer and wood rack. I had the mill cut them to 11 foot lengths for easier transport and handling in the shop. At 11 feet they hang off my utility trailer a bit front and back.

Tire Wheel Vehicle Tread Wood


I also received the quote for the CNC cut templates, a very reasonable $345. The templates will be made from 1/2" MDF and should be ready in about 2-3 weeks.

While I wait for the templates, I will start roughing out my chair parts on the bandsaw.
looks like a load of fun to me tung.cant wait to follow your journey on this build,
 

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A Lumber Mill Run

The Sapele that I ordered arrived at Hearne Hardwoods earlier in the week. I need about 300 bf for this set of chairs. I can get all of the components for a single chair from one 8/4 board as long as it is at least 9" wide and 10' long, so I need at least 12 boards. Ed at Hearne brought in 400 bf of wide 8/4 quarter sawn Sapele for me to select my boards from. The boards are all 16-18 foot lengths, and 10"+ wide.

Forklift truck Wheel Tire Vehicle Automotive tire


At 16 to 18 feet long these boards are too big for my trailer and wood rack. I had the mill cut them to 11 foot lengths for easier transport and handling in the shop. At 11 feet they hang off my utility trailer a bit front and back.

Tire Wheel Vehicle Tread Wood


I also received the quote for the CNC cut templates, a very reasonable $345. The templates will be made from 1/2" MDF and should be ready in about 2-3 weeks.

While I wait for the templates, I will start roughing out my chair parts on the bandsaw.
What an awesome project, keep us udated
 

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A Lumber Mill Run

The Sapele that I ordered arrived at Hearne Hardwoods earlier in the week. I need about 300 bf for this set of chairs. I can get all of the components for a single chair from one 8/4 board as long as it is at least 9" wide and 10' long, so I need at least 12 boards. Ed at Hearne brought in 400 bf of wide 8/4 quarter sawn Sapele for me to select my boards from. The boards are all 16-18 foot lengths, and 10"+ wide.

Forklift truck Wheel Tire Vehicle Automotive tire


At 16 to 18 feet long these boards are too big for my trailer and wood rack. I had the mill cut them to 11 foot lengths for easier transport and handling in the shop. At 11 feet they hang off my utility trailer a bit front and back.

Tire Wheel Vehicle Tread Wood


I also received the quote for the CNC cut templates, a very reasonable $345. The templates will be made from 1/2" MDF and should be ready in about 2-3 weeks.

While I wait for the templates, I will start roughing out my chair parts on the bandsaw.
Very handsome stack of sapele!
 

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Discussion Starter · #92 ·
Roughing It

The sapele has been in the shop for a week acclimating and my CNC cut templates will not be ready for a while, so I got busy roughing out parts. I started with the largest parts, the back legs. A leg blank 7 inches wide will allow me to cut both back legs for a chair from a single board, helping with grain and color match. Several of the boards were a bit over 14" wide, allowing me to get two pairs of legs from each cut length.

Rectangle Wood Floor Composite material Gas


To be sure I have spare material in case of an error, I cut enough parts for 14 chairs. I ripped the wide stock to 7" widths on the bandsaw, then joined one face and edge before planing to final thickness.

Wood Flooring Floor Hardwood Wood stain


As I started planing the stock to thickness, some internal compression damage was revealed on several pieces. All of the damage was located where the lumber had been stickered in the yard. In the image below you can still see some of the sticker stain next to the damaged area.

Wood Rectangle Table Slope Hardwood


I went back to the lumber pile to rough out some additional replacement boards. With these boards planed to thickness, they are as far as I can take them until I get the templates.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Most of the damaged boards were salvaged later to make smaller parts such as the front legs (that's why we always start with the biggest parts first, right?). In some cases the grain was not running parallel to the edge of the board, requiring me to lay out the parts parallel to the grain and true up on the bandsaw and jointer. Truing up in this way helps avoid the diagonal grain seen in the top leg below, which will be used for setup only.

Grille Wood Rectangle Automotive exterior Bumper


As I was working I kept a pair of diagonal cutters in my pocket to remove stray staples from the lumber yard. I don't cut the staples, but I find the diagonals get a good bite making them easier to remove.

Wood Natural material Composite material Tints and shades Brick


Next I roughed out the stock for the back slats. Ideally the center slat and two outside slats should come from the same board and be kept in sequence. It's going to be a real challenge to keep all of the parts properly labeled and oriented as I make these parts.

Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Floor


With the two largest parts roughed out, I moved on to cutting the stock for the smaller parts. The crest rail and lower back seat rail are made from 8/4 stock. The side seat rails and front rail finish up at 7/8" thick so I will resaw the 8/4 stock to get two parts from each blank. The poplar blanks will be used as setup pieces.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


The majority of the parts are rough cut at this point, with the exception of the lower stretcher components. These parts are small and can be easily cut from the drop offs left over from roughing out the main chair parts.

Outdoor bench Wood Outdoor furniture Rectangle Art


Next step: Finish roughing out the remaining parts then joint and plane to size in preparation for pattern routing and sanding.
 

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Roughing It

The sapele has been in the shop for a week acclimating and my CNC cut templates will not be ready for a while, so I got busy roughing out parts. I started with the largest parts, the back legs. A leg blank 7 inches wide will allow me to cut both back legs for a chair from a single board, helping with grain and color match. Several of the boards were a bit over 14" wide, allowing me to get two pairs of legs from each cut length.



To be sure I have spare material in case of an error, I cut enough parts for 14 chairs. I ripped the wide stock to 7" widths on the bandsaw, then joined one face and edge before planing to final thickness.



As I started planing the stock to thickness, some internal compression damage was revealed on several pieces. All of the damage was located where the lumber had been stickered in the yard. In the image below you can still see some of the sticker stain next to the damaged area.



I went back to the lumber pile to rough out some additional replacement boards. With these boards planed to thickness, they are as far as I can take them until I get the templates.



Most of the damaged boards were salvaged later to make smaller parts such as the front legs (that's why we always start with the biggest parts first, right?). In some cases the grain was not running parallel to the edge of the board, requiring me to lay out the parts parallel to the grain and true up on the bandsaw and jointer. Truing up in this way helps avoid the diagonal grain seen in the top leg below, which will be used for setup only.



As I was working I kept a pair of diagonal cutters in my pocket to remove stray staples from the lumber yard. I don't cut the staples, but I find the diagonals get a good bite making them easier to remove.



Next I roughed out the stock for the back slats. Ideally the center slat and two outside slats should come from the same board and be kept in sequence. It's going to be a real challenge to keep all of the parts properly labeled and oriented as I make these parts.



With the two largest parts roughed out, I moved on to cutting the stock for the smaller parts. The crest rail and lower back seat rail are made from 8/4 stock. The side seat rails and front rail finish up at 7/8" thick so I will resaw the 8/4 stock to get two parts from each blank. The poplar blanks will be used as setup pieces.



The majority of the parts are rough cut at this point, with the exception of the lower stretcher components. These parts are small and can be easily cut from the drop offs left over from roughing out the main chair parts.



Next step: Finish roughing out the remaining parts then joint and plane to size in preparation for pattern routing and sanding.
You certainly have been busy. I can certainly relate to using the scrap for making the smaller pieces for the chairs.

I'm curious if you are keeping track of the hours spent working on a project this large. That band saw looks very impressive as well.
 

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Roughing It

The sapele has been in the shop for a week acclimating and my CNC cut templates will not be ready for a while, so I got busy roughing out parts. I started with the largest parts, the back legs. A leg blank 7 inches wide will allow me to cut both back legs for a chair from a single board, helping with grain and color match. Several of the boards were a bit over 14" wide, allowing me to get two pairs of legs from each cut length.

Rectangle Wood Floor Composite material Gas


To be sure I have spare material in case of an error, I cut enough parts for 14 chairs. I ripped the wide stock to 7" widths on the bandsaw, then joined one face and edge before planing to final thickness.

Wood Flooring Floor Hardwood Wood stain


As I started planing the stock to thickness, some internal compression damage was revealed on several pieces. All of the damage was located where the lumber had been stickered in the yard. In the image below you can still see some of the sticker stain next to the damaged area.

Wood Rectangle Table Slope Hardwood


I went back to the lumber pile to rough out some additional replacement boards. With these boards planed to thickness, they are as far as I can take them until I get the templates.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Most of the damaged boards were salvaged later to make smaller parts such as the front legs (that's why we always start with the biggest parts first, right?). In some cases the grain was not running parallel to the edge of the board, requiring me to lay out the parts parallel to the grain and true up on the bandsaw and jointer. Truing up in this way helps avoid the diagonal grain seen in the top leg below, which will be used for setup only.

Grille Wood Rectangle Automotive exterior Bumper


As I was working I kept a pair of diagonal cutters in my pocket to remove stray staples from the lumber yard. I don't cut the staples, but I find the diagonals get a good bite making them easier to remove.

Wood Natural material Composite material Tints and shades Brick


Next I roughed out the stock for the back slats. Ideally the center slat and two outside slats should come from the same board and be kept in sequence. It's going to be a real challenge to keep all of the parts properly labeled and oriented as I make these parts.

Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Floor


With the two largest parts roughed out, I moved on to cutting the stock for the smaller parts. The crest rail and lower back seat rail are made from 8/4 stock. The side seat rails and front rail finish up at 7/8" thick so I will resaw the 8/4 stock to get two parts from each blank. The poplar blanks will be used as setup pieces.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


The majority of the parts are rough cut at this point, with the exception of the lower stretcher components. These parts are small and can be easily cut from the drop offs left over from roughing out the main chair parts.

Outdoor bench Wood Outdoor furniture Rectangle Art


Next step: Finish roughing out the remaining parts then joint and plane to size in preparation for pattern routing and sanding.
and the journey begins!its gonna be a fun trip,cant wait buddy.
 

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Roughing It

The sapele has been in the shop for a week acclimating and my CNC cut templates will not be ready for a while, so I got busy roughing out parts. I started with the largest parts, the back legs. A leg blank 7 inches wide will allow me to cut both back legs for a chair from a single board, helping with grain and color match. Several of the boards were a bit over 14" wide, allowing me to get two pairs of legs from each cut length.

Rectangle Wood Floor Composite material Gas


To be sure I have spare material in case of an error, I cut enough parts for 14 chairs. I ripped the wide stock to 7" widths on the bandsaw, then joined one face and edge before planing to final thickness.

Wood Flooring Floor Hardwood Wood stain


As I started planing the stock to thickness, some internal compression damage was revealed on several pieces. All of the damage was located where the lumber had been stickered in the yard. In the image below you can still see some of the sticker stain next to the damaged area.

Wood Rectangle Table Slope Hardwood


I went back to the lumber pile to rough out some additional replacement boards. With these boards planed to thickness, they are as far as I can take them until I get the templates.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Most of the damaged boards were salvaged later to make smaller parts such as the front legs (that's why we always start with the biggest parts first, right?). In some cases the grain was not running parallel to the edge of the board, requiring me to lay out the parts parallel to the grain and true up on the bandsaw and jointer. Truing up in this way helps avoid the diagonal grain seen in the top leg below, which will be used for setup only.

Grille Wood Rectangle Automotive exterior Bumper


As I was working I kept a pair of diagonal cutters in my pocket to remove stray staples from the lumber yard. I don't cut the staples, but I find the diagonals get a good bite making them easier to remove.

Wood Natural material Composite material Tints and shades Brick


Next I roughed out the stock for the back slats. Ideally the center slat and two outside slats should come from the same board and be kept in sequence. It's going to be a real challenge to keep all of the parts properly labeled and oriented as I make these parts.

Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Floor


With the two largest parts roughed out, I moved on to cutting the stock for the smaller parts. The crest rail and lower back seat rail are made from 8/4 stock. The side seat rails and front rail finish up at 7/8" thick so I will resaw the 8/4 stock to get two parts from each blank. The poplar blanks will be used as setup pieces.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


The majority of the parts are rough cut at this point, with the exception of the lower stretcher components. These parts are small and can be easily cut from the drop offs left over from roughing out the main chair parts.

Outdoor bench Wood Outdoor furniture Rectangle Art


Next step: Finish roughing out the remaining parts then joint and plane to size in preparation for pattern routing and sanding.
You make me really miss being able to back the truck up to MacBeath's in Berkeley, CA and load up a bunch of mahogany and QSWO for various projects. I really need to make a nice heirloom piece. You've inspired me. But first I have to finish building the shop. Not complaining. Looking forward to you getting your CNC'd parts. These kind of projects in my mind justifying buying a benchtop CNC machine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #96 ·
Roughing It

The sapele has been in the shop for a week acclimating and my CNC cut templates will not be ready for a while, so I got busy roughing out parts. I started with the largest parts, the back legs. A leg blank 7 inches wide will allow me to cut both back legs for a chair from a single board, helping with grain and color match. Several of the boards were a bit over 14" wide, allowing me to get two pairs of legs from each cut length.

Rectangle Wood Floor Composite material Gas


To be sure I have spare material in case of an error, I cut enough parts for 14 chairs. I ripped the wide stock to 7" widths on the bandsaw, then joined one face and edge before planing to final thickness.

Wood Flooring Floor Hardwood Wood stain


As I started planing the stock to thickness, some internal compression damage was revealed on several pieces. All of the damage was located where the lumber had been stickered in the yard. In the image below you can still see some of the sticker stain next to the damaged area.

Wood Rectangle Table Slope Hardwood


I went back to the lumber pile to rough out some additional replacement boards. With these boards planed to thickness, they are as far as I can take them until I get the templates.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Most of the damaged boards were salvaged later to make smaller parts such as the front legs (that's why we always start with the biggest parts first, right?). In some cases the grain was not running parallel to the edge of the board, requiring me to lay out the parts parallel to the grain and true up on the bandsaw and jointer. Truing up in this way helps avoid the diagonal grain seen in the top leg below, which will be used for setup only.

Grille Wood Rectangle Automotive exterior Bumper


As I was working I kept a pair of diagonal cutters in my pocket to remove stray staples from the lumber yard. I don't cut the staples, but I find the diagonals get a good bite making them easier to remove.

Wood Natural material Composite material Tints and shades Brick


Next I roughed out the stock for the back slats. Ideally the center slat and two outside slats should come from the same board and be kept in sequence. It's going to be a real challenge to keep all of the parts properly labeled and oriented as I make these parts.

Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Floor


With the two largest parts roughed out, I moved on to cutting the stock for the smaller parts. The crest rail and lower back seat rail are made from 8/4 stock. The side seat rails and front rail finish up at 7/8" thick so I will resaw the 8/4 stock to get two parts from each blank. The poplar blanks will be used as setup pieces.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


The majority of the parts are rough cut at this point, with the exception of the lower stretcher components. These parts are small and can be easily cut from the drop offs left over from roughing out the main chair parts.

Outdoor bench Wood Outdoor furniture Rectangle Art


Next step: Finish roughing out the remaining parts then joint and plane to size in preparation for pattern routing and sanding.
These kind of projects in my mind justifying buying a benchtop CNC machine.

- CaptainSkully
I would have thought so as well, but for less than $350 to cut the templates there was no way I could justify it (This time…). I really don't have room for a CNC or time to learn how to program it anyway.

Good luck with the shop build, that is always an adventure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #97 ·
Roughing It

The sapele has been in the shop for a week acclimating and my CNC cut templates will not be ready for a while, so I got busy roughing out parts. I started with the largest parts, the back legs. A leg blank 7 inches wide will allow me to cut both back legs for a chair from a single board, helping with grain and color match. Several of the boards were a bit over 14" wide, allowing me to get two pairs of legs from each cut length.

Rectangle Wood Floor Composite material Gas


To be sure I have spare material in case of an error, I cut enough parts for 14 chairs. I ripped the wide stock to 7" widths on the bandsaw, then joined one face and edge before planing to final thickness.

Wood Flooring Floor Hardwood Wood stain


As I started planing the stock to thickness, some internal compression damage was revealed on several pieces. All of the damage was located where the lumber had been stickered in the yard. In the image below you can still see some of the sticker stain next to the damaged area.

Wood Rectangle Table Slope Hardwood


I went back to the lumber pile to rough out some additional replacement boards. With these boards planed to thickness, they are as far as I can take them until I get the templates.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Most of the damaged boards were salvaged later to make smaller parts such as the front legs (that's why we always start with the biggest parts first, right?). In some cases the grain was not running parallel to the edge of the board, requiring me to lay out the parts parallel to the grain and true up on the bandsaw and jointer. Truing up in this way helps avoid the diagonal grain seen in the top leg below, which will be used for setup only.

Grille Wood Rectangle Automotive exterior Bumper


As I was working I kept a pair of diagonal cutters in my pocket to remove stray staples from the lumber yard. I don't cut the staples, but I find the diagonals get a good bite making them easier to remove.

Wood Natural material Composite material Tints and shades Brick


Next I roughed out the stock for the back slats. Ideally the center slat and two outside slats should come from the same board and be kept in sequence. It's going to be a real challenge to keep all of the parts properly labeled and oriented as I make these parts.

Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Floor


With the two largest parts roughed out, I moved on to cutting the stock for the smaller parts. The crest rail and lower back seat rail are made from 8/4 stock. The side seat rails and front rail finish up at 7/8" thick so I will resaw the 8/4 stock to get two parts from each blank. The poplar blanks will be used as setup pieces.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


The majority of the parts are rough cut at this point, with the exception of the lower stretcher components. These parts are small and can be easily cut from the drop offs left over from roughing out the main chair parts.

Outdoor bench Wood Outdoor furniture Rectangle Art


Next step: Finish roughing out the remaining parts then joint and plane to size in preparation for pattern routing and sanding.
I m curious if you are keeping track of the hours spent working on a project this large. That band saw looks very impressive as well.

- EarlS
Yep, I have a simple paper form that I jot down the start and finish times as I'm building. I keep track of time by process step. I created it in Visio, and it's a page in the master file where I have the steps for the entire project layed out.
 

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Roughing It

The sapele has been in the shop for a week acclimating and my CNC cut templates will not be ready for a while, so I got busy roughing out parts. I started with the largest parts, the back legs. A leg blank 7 inches wide will allow me to cut both back legs for a chair from a single board, helping with grain and color match. Several of the boards were a bit over 14" wide, allowing me to get two pairs of legs from each cut length.

Rectangle Wood Floor Composite material Gas


To be sure I have spare material in case of an error, I cut enough parts for 14 chairs. I ripped the wide stock to 7" widths on the bandsaw, then joined one face and edge before planing to final thickness.

Wood Flooring Floor Hardwood Wood stain


As I started planing the stock to thickness, some internal compression damage was revealed on several pieces. All of the damage was located where the lumber had been stickered in the yard. In the image below you can still see some of the sticker stain next to the damaged area.

Wood Rectangle Table Slope Hardwood


I went back to the lumber pile to rough out some additional replacement boards. With these boards planed to thickness, they are as far as I can take them until I get the templates.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Most of the damaged boards were salvaged later to make smaller parts such as the front legs (that's why we always start with the biggest parts first, right?). In some cases the grain was not running parallel to the edge of the board, requiring me to lay out the parts parallel to the grain and true up on the bandsaw and jointer. Truing up in this way helps avoid the diagonal grain seen in the top leg below, which will be used for setup only.

Grille Wood Rectangle Automotive exterior Bumper


As I was working I kept a pair of diagonal cutters in my pocket to remove stray staples from the lumber yard. I don't cut the staples, but I find the diagonals get a good bite making them easier to remove.

Wood Natural material Composite material Tints and shades Brick


Next I roughed out the stock for the back slats. Ideally the center slat and two outside slats should come from the same board and be kept in sequence. It's going to be a real challenge to keep all of the parts properly labeled and oriented as I make these parts.

Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Floor


With the two largest parts roughed out, I moved on to cutting the stock for the smaller parts. The crest rail and lower back seat rail are made from 8/4 stock. The side seat rails and front rail finish up at 7/8" thick so I will resaw the 8/4 stock to get two parts from each blank. The poplar blanks will be used as setup pieces.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


The majority of the parts are rough cut at this point, with the exception of the lower stretcher components. These parts are small and can be easily cut from the drop offs left over from roughing out the main chair parts.

Outdoor bench Wood Outdoor furniture Rectangle Art


Next step: Finish roughing out the remaining parts then joint and plane to size in preparation for pattern routing and sanding.
Looks like you're off to a good start!

I'm looking forward to seeing how your templates turn out. Question, though: Are you concerned about using MDF material for the templates as opposed to 1/2" plywood? It seems with the number of parts you'll be milling with these templates, and the relative softness of MDF, that the templates could lose the integrity of their edges and cause parts to be imprecise copies of each other?

The reason I ask, is that I've had MDF templates get dented slightly along the business edge, and have to be refabricated. Swore I'd always use 1/2" Baltic Birch from then on….......!
 

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Discussion Starter · #99 ·
Roughing It

The sapele has been in the shop for a week acclimating and my CNC cut templates will not be ready for a while, so I got busy roughing out parts. I started with the largest parts, the back legs. A leg blank 7 inches wide will allow me to cut both back legs for a chair from a single board, helping with grain and color match. Several of the boards were a bit over 14" wide, allowing me to get two pairs of legs from each cut length.

Rectangle Wood Floor Composite material Gas


To be sure I have spare material in case of an error, I cut enough parts for 14 chairs. I ripped the wide stock to 7" widths on the bandsaw, then joined one face and edge before planing to final thickness.

Wood Flooring Floor Hardwood Wood stain


As I started planing the stock to thickness, some internal compression damage was revealed on several pieces. All of the damage was located where the lumber had been stickered in the yard. In the image below you can still see some of the sticker stain next to the damaged area.

Wood Rectangle Table Slope Hardwood


I went back to the lumber pile to rough out some additional replacement boards. With these boards planed to thickness, they are as far as I can take them until I get the templates.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Most of the damaged boards were salvaged later to make smaller parts such as the front legs (that's why we always start with the biggest parts first, right?). In some cases the grain was not running parallel to the edge of the board, requiring me to lay out the parts parallel to the grain and true up on the bandsaw and jointer. Truing up in this way helps avoid the diagonal grain seen in the top leg below, which will be used for setup only.

Grille Wood Rectangle Automotive exterior Bumper


As I was working I kept a pair of diagonal cutters in my pocket to remove stray staples from the lumber yard. I don't cut the staples, but I find the diagonals get a good bite making them easier to remove.

Wood Natural material Composite material Tints and shades Brick


Next I roughed out the stock for the back slats. Ideally the center slat and two outside slats should come from the same board and be kept in sequence. It's going to be a real challenge to keep all of the parts properly labeled and oriented as I make these parts.

Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Floor


With the two largest parts roughed out, I moved on to cutting the stock for the smaller parts. The crest rail and lower back seat rail are made from 8/4 stock. The side seat rails and front rail finish up at 7/8" thick so I will resaw the 8/4 stock to get two parts from each blank. The poplar blanks will be used as setup pieces.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


The majority of the parts are rough cut at this point, with the exception of the lower stretcher components. These parts are small and can be easily cut from the drop offs left over from roughing out the main chair parts.

Outdoor bench Wood Outdoor furniture Rectangle Art


Next step: Finish roughing out the remaining parts then joint and plane to size in preparation for pattern routing and sanding.
Looks like you re off to a good start!

I m looking forward to seeing how your templates turn out. Question, though: Are you concerned about using MDF material for the templates as opposed to 1/2" plywood? It seems with the number of parts you ll be milling with these templates, and the relative softness of MDF, that the templates could lose the integrity of their edges and cause parts to be imprecise copies of each other?

The reason I ask, is that I ve had MDF templates get dented slightly along the business edge, and have to be refabricated. Swore I d always use 1/2" Baltic Birch from then on….......!

- Mean_Dean
Not so much, but I agree it is a risk. One option is to harden the business edge of the templates with some thin CA glue. I've never needed to do this but I think for this project it is probably a good idea.
 

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Roughing It

The sapele has been in the shop for a week acclimating and my CNC cut templates will not be ready for a while, so I got busy roughing out parts. I started with the largest parts, the back legs. A leg blank 7 inches wide will allow me to cut both back legs for a chair from a single board, helping with grain and color match. Several of the boards were a bit over 14" wide, allowing me to get two pairs of legs from each cut length.

Rectangle Wood Floor Composite material Gas


To be sure I have spare material in case of an error, I cut enough parts for 14 chairs. I ripped the wide stock to 7" widths on the bandsaw, then joined one face and edge before planing to final thickness.

Wood Flooring Floor Hardwood Wood stain


As I started planing the stock to thickness, some internal compression damage was revealed on several pieces. All of the damage was located where the lumber had been stickered in the yard. In the image below you can still see some of the sticker stain next to the damaged area.

Wood Rectangle Table Slope Hardwood


I went back to the lumber pile to rough out some additional replacement boards. With these boards planed to thickness, they are as far as I can take them until I get the templates.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


Most of the damaged boards were salvaged later to make smaller parts such as the front legs (that's why we always start with the biggest parts first, right?). In some cases the grain was not running parallel to the edge of the board, requiring me to lay out the parts parallel to the grain and true up on the bandsaw and jointer. Truing up in this way helps avoid the diagonal grain seen in the top leg below, which will be used for setup only.

Grille Wood Rectangle Automotive exterior Bumper


As I was working I kept a pair of diagonal cutters in my pocket to remove stray staples from the lumber yard. I don't cut the staples, but I find the diagonals get a good bite making them easier to remove.

Wood Natural material Composite material Tints and shades Brick


Next I roughed out the stock for the back slats. Ideally the center slat and two outside slats should come from the same board and be kept in sequence. It's going to be a real challenge to keep all of the parts properly labeled and oriented as I make these parts.

Brown Rectangle Wood Flooring Floor


With the two largest parts roughed out, I moved on to cutting the stock for the smaller parts. The crest rail and lower back seat rail are made from 8/4 stock. The side seat rails and front rail finish up at 7/8" thick so I will resaw the 8/4 stock to get two parts from each blank. The poplar blanks will be used as setup pieces.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


The majority of the parts are rough cut at this point, with the exception of the lower stretcher components. These parts are small and can be easily cut from the drop offs left over from roughing out the main chair parts.

Outdoor bench Wood Outdoor furniture Rectangle Art


Next step: Finish roughing out the remaining parts then joint and plane to size in preparation for pattern routing and sanding.
If you are worried about the integrity of the original templates, you can always start the project by making a set of copies of the originals that way if one gets a ding, you can make a replacement off the original. I'm sure there is some technical term that is used to better describe the parts and process.
 

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