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Final Wrap Up

Here are the project totals, for those that are interested.

Board feet of Sapele used: 315
4' x 8' sheets of 3/4" baltic birch plywood: 2
Number of chair parts fabricated: 285
Number of mortises: 720
Number of floating tenons: 360
Number of square ebony plugs: 405
Number of ebony splines: 120
Quarts of finish used: 10
Hours to complete: 596

What worked well?

I spent about 40 hours drawing templates in AutoCAD to be cut by CNC at the start of the project. I made some minor adjustments to replace dominos with the the standard mortise sizes available with the Leigh FMT. This was time well spent as it made the fabrication go very smoothly.

The Leigh FMT jig again proved worthwhile. This is a well made tool and makes beautiful, precise mortises. With 720 total mortises on this project, I gave it a good workout.

Carefully planning and thinking through the steps of construction and assembly for these chairs was key to making sure they came together successfully.

Bloopers

I broke a few of the smaller 3/16" loose tenons while dry assembling and disassembling the chairs. Using a 1/8" chisel I was able to extract the broken tenon pieces without damaging the mortises.

Tableware Wood Kitchen utensil Table Hardwood


The biggest mistake was when a dry assembled chair disassembled itself and the back assembly fell over, breaking the top of the center back splat.

Wood Sleeve Grey Collar Rectangle


Luckily it was a clean break and no wood was lost. I squeezed some glue into the break, put wax paper on either side and clamped the splat between clamp blocks.

Wood Table Composite material Automotive design Engineering


After it dried I cleaned up the repair with a scraper and it was nearly impossible to see.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Composite material Flooring


Overall this was a fun and challenging project and I'm glad I took it on. A special thanks to Bob Lang for teaching the class and providing advice, and to Darrell Peart for the design that these chairs are based on.
thats an impressive list tung,im tiered just reading it-lol.
 

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Joined
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4,322 Posts
Final Wrap Up

Here are the project totals, for those that are interested.

Board feet of Sapele used: 315
4' x 8' sheets of 3/4" baltic birch plywood: 2
Number of chair parts fabricated: 285
Number of mortises: 720
Number of floating tenons: 360
Number of square ebony plugs: 405
Number of ebony splines: 120
Quarts of finish used: 10
Hours to complete: 596

What worked well?

I spent about 40 hours drawing templates in AutoCAD to be cut by CNC at the start of the project. I made some minor adjustments to replace dominos with the the standard mortise sizes available with the Leigh FMT. This was time well spent as it made the fabrication go very smoothly.

The Leigh FMT jig again proved worthwhile. This is a well made tool and makes beautiful, precise mortises. With 720 total mortises on this project, I gave it a good workout.

Carefully planning and thinking through the steps of construction and assembly for these chairs was key to making sure they came together successfully.

Bloopers

I broke a few of the smaller 3/16" loose tenons while dry assembling and disassembling the chairs. Using a 1/8" chisel I was able to extract the broken tenon pieces without damaging the mortises.

Tableware Wood Kitchen utensil Table Hardwood


The biggest mistake was when a dry assembled chair disassembled itself and the back assembly fell over, breaking the top of the center back splat.

Wood Sleeve Grey Collar Rectangle


Luckily it was a clean break and no wood was lost. I squeezed some glue into the break, put wax paper on either side and clamped the splat between clamp blocks.

Wood Table Composite material Automotive design Engineering


After it dried I cleaned up the repair with a scraper and it was nearly impossible to see.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Composite material Flooring


Overall this was a fun and challenging project and I'm glad I took it on. A special thanks to Bob Lang for teaching the class and providing advice, and to Darrell Peart for the design that these chairs are based on.
What a herculean undertaking. You ate the elephant one bite at a time. Can't wait to see the pictures of the table and chairs on the project page.

What's next on your woodworking agenda?
 

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1,192 Posts
Discussion Starter · #283 ·
Final Wrap Up

Here are the project totals, for those that are interested.

Board feet of Sapele used: 315
4' x 8' sheets of 3/4" baltic birch plywood: 2
Number of chair parts fabricated: 285
Number of mortises: 720
Number of floating tenons: 360
Number of square ebony plugs: 405
Number of ebony splines: 120
Quarts of finish used: 10
Hours to complete: 596

What worked well?

I spent about 40 hours drawing templates in AutoCAD to be cut by CNC at the start of the project. I made some minor adjustments to replace dominos with the the standard mortise sizes available with the Leigh FMT. This was time well spent as it made the fabrication go very smoothly.

The Leigh FMT jig again proved worthwhile. This is a well made tool and makes beautiful, precise mortises. With 720 total mortises on this project, I gave it a good workout.

Carefully planning and thinking through the steps of construction and assembly for these chairs was key to making sure they came together successfully.

Bloopers

I broke a few of the smaller 3/16" loose tenons while dry assembling and disassembling the chairs. Using a 1/8" chisel I was able to extract the broken tenon pieces without damaging the mortises.

Tableware Wood Kitchen utensil Table Hardwood


The biggest mistake was when a dry assembled chair disassembled itself and the back assembly fell over, breaking the top of the center back splat.

Wood Sleeve Grey Collar Rectangle


Luckily it was a clean break and no wood was lost. I squeezed some glue into the break, put wax paper on either side and clamped the splat between clamp blocks.

Wood Table Composite material Automotive design Engineering


After it dried I cleaned up the repair with a scraper and it was nearly impossible to see.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Composite material Flooring


Overall this was a fun and challenging project and I'm glad I took it on. A special thanks to Bob Lang for teaching the class and providing advice, and to Darrell Peart for the design that these chairs are based on.
Thanks guys.

Earl- next project is the Thorsen sideboard, although I might need to slip a small project or two in before I start that one.
 

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· Registered
Joined
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174 Posts
Final Wrap Up

Here are the project totals, for those that are interested.

Board feet of Sapele used: 315
4' x 8' sheets of 3/4" baltic birch plywood: 2
Number of chair parts fabricated: 285
Number of mortises: 720
Number of floating tenons: 360
Number of square ebony plugs: 405
Number of ebony splines: 120
Quarts of finish used: 10
Hours to complete: 596

What worked well?

I spent about 40 hours drawing templates in AutoCAD to be cut by CNC at the start of the project. I made some minor adjustments to replace dominos with the the standard mortise sizes available with the Leigh FMT. This was time well spent as it made the fabrication go very smoothly.

The Leigh FMT jig again proved worthwhile. This is a well made tool and makes beautiful, precise mortises. With 720 total mortises on this project, I gave it a good workout.

Carefully planning and thinking through the steps of construction and assembly for these chairs was key to making sure they came together successfully.

Bloopers

I broke a few of the smaller 3/16" loose tenons while dry assembling and disassembling the chairs. Using a 1/8" chisel I was able to extract the broken tenon pieces without damaging the mortises.

Tableware Wood Kitchen utensil Table Hardwood


The biggest mistake was when a dry assembled chair disassembled itself and the back assembly fell over, breaking the top of the center back splat.

Wood Sleeve Grey Collar Rectangle


Luckily it was a clean break and no wood was lost. I squeezed some glue into the break, put wax paper on either side and clamped the splat between clamp blocks.

Wood Table Composite material Automotive design Engineering


After it dried I cleaned up the repair with a scraper and it was nearly impossible to see.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Composite material Flooring


Overall this was a fun and challenging project and I'm glad I took it on. A special thanks to Bob Lang for teaching the class and providing advice, and to Darrell Peart for the design that these chairs are based on.
Just saw your chair in the "Gallery" section of Fine Woodworking. Once again, nice work on an incredibly involved project.
 

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· Registered
Joined
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1,192 Posts
Discussion Starter · #285 ·
Final Wrap Up

Here are the project totals, for those that are interested.

Board feet of Sapele used: 315
4' x 8' sheets of 3/4" baltic birch plywood: 2
Number of chair parts fabricated: 285
Number of mortises: 720
Number of floating tenons: 360
Number of square ebony plugs: 405
Number of ebony splines: 120
Quarts of finish used: 10
Hours to complete: 596

What worked well?

I spent about 40 hours drawing templates in AutoCAD to be cut by CNC at the start of the project. I made some minor adjustments to replace dominos with the the standard mortise sizes available with the Leigh FMT. This was time well spent as it made the fabrication go very smoothly.

The Leigh FMT jig again proved worthwhile. This is a well made tool and makes beautiful, precise mortises. With 720 total mortises on this project, I gave it a good workout.

Carefully planning and thinking through the steps of construction and assembly for these chairs was key to making sure they came together successfully.

Bloopers

I broke a few of the smaller 3/16" loose tenons while dry assembling and disassembling the chairs. Using a 1/8" chisel I was able to extract the broken tenon pieces without damaging the mortises.

Tableware Wood Kitchen utensil Table Hardwood


The biggest mistake was when a dry assembled chair disassembled itself and the back assembly fell over, breaking the top of the center back splat.

Wood Sleeve Grey Collar Rectangle


Luckily it was a clean break and no wood was lost. I squeezed some glue into the break, put wax paper on either side and clamped the splat between clamp blocks.

Wood Table Composite material Automotive design Engineering


After it dried I cleaned up the repair with a scraper and it was nearly impossible to see.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Composite material Flooring


Overall this was a fun and challenging project and I'm glad I took it on. A special thanks to Bob Lang for teaching the class and providing advice, and to Darrell Peart for the design that these chairs are based on.
Just saw your chair in the "Gallery" section of Fine Woodworking. Once again, nice work on an incredibly involved project.

- BobLang
Thanks Bob, they would not have been possible if I had not taken your class! Your help was invaluable!
 

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· Registered
Joined
·
4,300 Posts
Final Wrap Up

Here are the project totals, for those that are interested.

Board feet of Sapele used: 315
4' x 8' sheets of 3/4" baltic birch plywood: 2
Number of chair parts fabricated: 285
Number of mortises: 720
Number of floating tenons: 360
Number of square ebony plugs: 405
Number of ebony splines: 120
Quarts of finish used: 10
Hours to complete: 596

What worked well?

I spent about 40 hours drawing templates in AutoCAD to be cut by CNC at the start of the project. I made some minor adjustments to replace dominos with the the standard mortise sizes available with the Leigh FMT. This was time well spent as it made the fabrication go very smoothly.

The Leigh FMT jig again proved worthwhile. This is a well made tool and makes beautiful, precise mortises. With 720 total mortises on this project, I gave it a good workout.

Carefully planning and thinking through the steps of construction and assembly for these chairs was key to making sure they came together successfully.

Bloopers

I broke a few of the smaller 3/16" loose tenons while dry assembling and disassembling the chairs. Using a 1/8" chisel I was able to extract the broken tenon pieces without damaging the mortises.

Tableware Wood Kitchen utensil Table Hardwood


The biggest mistake was when a dry assembled chair disassembled itself and the back assembly fell over, breaking the top of the center back splat.

Wood Sleeve Grey Collar Rectangle


Luckily it was a clean break and no wood was lost. I squeezed some glue into the break, put wax paper on either side and clamped the splat between clamp blocks.

Wood Table Composite material Automotive design Engineering


After it dried I cleaned up the repair with a scraper and it was nearly impossible to see.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Composite material Flooring


Overall this was a fun and challenging project and I'm glad I took it on. A special thanks to Bob Lang for teaching the class and providing advice, and to Darrell Peart for the design that these chairs are based on.
Congrats on the Gallery spot in FWW! When Bob mentioned it I looked forward to receiving that issue and having a close look. So many of those entries look too fine to be real 8^)

Did you photograph it or did they send someone?
 

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· Registered
Joined
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1,192 Posts
Discussion Starter · #287 ·
Final Wrap Up

Here are the project totals, for those that are interested.

Board feet of Sapele used: 315
4' x 8' sheets of 3/4" baltic birch plywood: 2
Number of chair parts fabricated: 285
Number of mortises: 720
Number of floating tenons: 360
Number of square ebony plugs: 405
Number of ebony splines: 120
Quarts of finish used: 10
Hours to complete: 596

What worked well?

I spent about 40 hours drawing templates in AutoCAD to be cut by CNC at the start of the project. I made some minor adjustments to replace dominos with the the standard mortise sizes available with the Leigh FMT. This was time well spent as it made the fabrication go very smoothly.

The Leigh FMT jig again proved worthwhile. This is a well made tool and makes beautiful, precise mortises. With 720 total mortises on this project, I gave it a good workout.

Carefully planning and thinking through the steps of construction and assembly for these chairs was key to making sure they came together successfully.

Bloopers

I broke a few of the smaller 3/16" loose tenons while dry assembling and disassembling the chairs. Using a 1/8" chisel I was able to extract the broken tenon pieces without damaging the mortises.

Tableware Wood Kitchen utensil Table Hardwood


The biggest mistake was when a dry assembled chair disassembled itself and the back assembly fell over, breaking the top of the center back splat.

Wood Sleeve Grey Collar Rectangle


Luckily it was a clean break and no wood was lost. I squeezed some glue into the break, put wax paper on either side and clamped the splat between clamp blocks.

Wood Table Composite material Automotive design Engineering


After it dried I cleaned up the repair with a scraper and it was nearly impossible to see.

Wood Rectangle Hardwood Composite material Flooring


Overall this was a fun and challenging project and I'm glad I took it on. A special thanks to Bob Lang for teaching the class and providing advice, and to Darrell Peart for the design that these chairs are based on.
Congrats on the Gallery spot in FWW! When Bob mentioned it I looked forward to receiving that issue and having a close look. So many of those entries look too fine to be real 8^)

Did you photograph it or did they send someone?

- splintergroup
Thanks, the photo is mine. It took me a long time to figure out that the key to getting published is to make their job easy by providing publication ready images. Luckily I did a photography minor as an undergrad.
 

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