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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Material Preparation

Now that my Thorsen inspired dining table is complete (you can see the BLOG here), it is time to turn my attention to a set of chairs. Since I have never built a chair, I decided to enroll in the Gamble House Side Chair class at Marc Adams School of Woodworking in Indiana. Many will know the instructor, Bob Lang, who is not only a Lumber Jocks member but has authored several books and was editor of Popular Woodworking magazine for many years. The chair design is based on the side chairs in the living room of the Gamble house in Pasadena.

The school mailed out a cut list a few weeks ago so students could prepare the required stock prior to class. I had enough sapele left over from making the dining table, so there was no need for a trip to the hardwood dealer. Since Indiana is about a 10 hour drive from Eastern Pennsylvania, I decided to cut up enough material to make two complete chairs to be sure I had sufficient material to cover any mistakes.

Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


With my stock cut, I gathered up the required tools for class. This includes square chisels, a Dozuki saw, a plastic head hammer for inserting ebony plugs and a dental pick for cleaning out square plug holes. I also packed a cordless drill and a ROS along with my PPE.

I am looking forward to learning some new woodworking skills and hopefully coming away from the week with a nice chair. After that, I will be into chair production.
 

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Material Preparation

Now that my Thorsen inspired dining table is complete (you can see the BLOG here), it is time to turn my attention to a set of chairs. Since I have never built a chair, I decided to enroll in the Gamble House Side Chair class at Marc Adams School of Woodworking in Indiana. Many will know the instructor, Bob Lang, who is not only a Lumber Jocks member but has authored several books and was editor of Popular Woodworking magazine for many years. The chair design is based on the side chairs in the living room of the Gamble house in Pasadena.

The school mailed out a cut list a few weeks ago so students could prepare the required stock prior to class. I had enough sapele left over from making the dining table, so there was no need for a trip to the hardwood dealer. Since Indiana is about a 10 hour drive from Eastern Pennsylvania, I decided to cut up enough material to make two complete chairs to be sure I had sufficient material to cover any mistakes.

Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


With my stock cut, I gathered up the required tools for class. This includes square chisels, a Dozuki saw, a plastic head hammer for inserting ebony plugs and a dental pick for cleaning out square plug holes. I also packed a cordless drill and a ROS along with my PPE.

I am looking forward to learning some new woodworking skills and hopefully coming away from the week with a nice chair. After that, I will be into chair production.
Should be fun, good luck at the class.
 

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Material Preparation

Now that my Thorsen inspired dining table is complete (you can see the BLOG here), it is time to turn my attention to a set of chairs. Since I have never built a chair, I decided to enroll in the Gamble House Side Chair class at Marc Adams School of Woodworking in Indiana. Many will know the instructor, Bob Lang, who is not only a Lumber Jocks member but has authored several books and was editor of Popular Woodworking magazine for many years. The chair design is based on the side chairs in the living room of the Gamble house in Pasadena.

The school mailed out a cut list a few weeks ago so students could prepare the required stock prior to class. I had enough sapele left over from making the dining table, so there was no need for a trip to the hardwood dealer. Since Indiana is about a 10 hour drive from Eastern Pennsylvania, I decided to cut up enough material to make two complete chairs to be sure I had sufficient material to cover any mistakes.

Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


With my stock cut, I gathered up the required tools for class. This includes square chisels, a Dozuki saw, a plastic head hammer for inserting ebony plugs and a dental pick for cleaning out square plug holes. I also packed a cordless drill and a ROS along with my PPE.

I am looking forward to learning some new woodworking skills and hopefully coming away from the week with a nice chair. After that, I will be into chair production.
This is SO cool! I checked out the school's website. Interesting model also, where you bring the materials and tools. In Marc Spagnola's video about building his chair at William Ng, he said they had a whole bunch of jigs pre-made. Will you be making jigs for the rest of your chairs? I guess using your finished pieces as a "template". !I wish I could bump some chairs up on my list, but my wife and son would destroy them. Maybe when he's off at college. Until then, I'll live vicariously through you. Best of luck at the class!
 

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Material Preparation

Now that my Thorsen inspired dining table is complete (you can see the BLOG here), it is time to turn my attention to a set of chairs. Since I have never built a chair, I decided to enroll in the Gamble House Side Chair class at Marc Adams School of Woodworking in Indiana. Many will know the instructor, Bob Lang, who is not only a Lumber Jocks member but has authored several books and was editor of Popular Woodworking magazine for many years. The chair design is based on the side chairs in the living room of the Gamble house in Pasadena.

The school mailed out a cut list a few weeks ago so students could prepare the required stock prior to class. I had enough sapele left over from making the dining table, so there was no need for a trip to the hardwood dealer. Since Indiana is about a 10 hour drive from Eastern Pennsylvania, I decided to cut up enough material to make two complete chairs to be sure I had sufficient material to cover any mistakes.

Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


With my stock cut, I gathered up the required tools for class. This includes square chisels, a Dozuki saw, a plastic head hammer for inserting ebony plugs and a dental pick for cleaning out square plug holes. I also packed a cordless drill and a ROS along with my PPE.

I am looking forward to learning some new woodworking skills and hopefully coming away from the week with a nice chair. After that, I will be into chair production.
looking forward to following your journey making these chairs,based on what I saw you do with that table I have no doubt your gonna wow us again.hoping you have a ton of fun and wishing I was going with you tung,enjoy.
 

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Material Preparation

Now that my Thorsen inspired dining table is complete (you can see the BLOG here), it is time to turn my attention to a set of chairs. Since I have never built a chair, I decided to enroll in the Gamble House Side Chair class at Marc Adams School of Woodworking in Indiana. Many will know the instructor, Bob Lang, who is not only a Lumber Jocks member but has authored several books and was editor of Popular Woodworking magazine for many years. The chair design is based on the side chairs in the living room of the Gamble house in Pasadena.

The school mailed out a cut list a few weeks ago so students could prepare the required stock prior to class. I had enough sapele left over from making the dining table, so there was no need for a trip to the hardwood dealer. Since Indiana is about a 10 hour drive from Eastern Pennsylvania, I decided to cut up enough material to make two complete chairs to be sure I had sufficient material to cover any mistakes.

Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


With my stock cut, I gathered up the required tools for class. This includes square chisels, a Dozuki saw, a plastic head hammer for inserting ebony plugs and a dental pick for cleaning out square plug holes. I also packed a cordless drill and a ROS along with my PPE.

I am looking forward to learning some new woodworking skills and hopefully coming away from the week with a nice chair. After that, I will be into chair production.
Sounds like the chair making class will be quite an adventure. I'll be watching for your real time posts from there.
 

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Material Preparation

Now that my Thorsen inspired dining table is complete (you can see the BLOG here), it is time to turn my attention to a set of chairs. Since I have never built a chair, I decided to enroll in the Gamble House Side Chair class at Marc Adams School of Woodworking in Indiana. Many will know the instructor, Bob Lang, who is not only a Lumber Jocks member but has authored several books and was editor of Popular Woodworking magazine for many years. The chair design is based on the side chairs in the living room of the Gamble house in Pasadena.

The school mailed out a cut list a few weeks ago so students could prepare the required stock prior to class. I had enough sapele left over from making the dining table, so there was no need for a trip to the hardwood dealer. Since Indiana is about a 10 hour drive from Eastern Pennsylvania, I decided to cut up enough material to make two complete chairs to be sure I had sufficient material to cover any mistakes.

Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


With my stock cut, I gathered up the required tools for class. This includes square chisels, a Dozuki saw, a plastic head hammer for inserting ebony plugs and a dental pick for cleaning out square plug holes. I also packed a cordless drill and a ROS along with my PPE.

I am looking forward to learning some new woodworking skills and hopefully coming away from the week with a nice chair. After that, I will be into chair production.
Is the Gamble House chair the style you plan to make to go around your table, or are you just learning the chair-making process with this class?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Material Preparation

Now that my Thorsen inspired dining table is complete (you can see the BLOG here), it is time to turn my attention to a set of chairs. Since I have never built a chair, I decided to enroll in the Gamble House Side Chair class at Marc Adams School of Woodworking in Indiana. Many will know the instructor, Bob Lang, who is not only a Lumber Jocks member but has authored several books and was editor of Popular Woodworking magazine for many years. The chair design is based on the side chairs in the living room of the Gamble house in Pasadena.

The school mailed out a cut list a few weeks ago so students could prepare the required stock prior to class. I had enough sapele left over from making the dining table, so there was no need for a trip to the hardwood dealer. Since Indiana is about a 10 hour drive from Eastern Pennsylvania, I decided to cut up enough material to make two complete chairs to be sure I had sufficient material to cover any mistakes.

Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


With my stock cut, I gathered up the required tools for class. This includes square chisels, a Dozuki saw, a plastic head hammer for inserting ebony plugs and a dental pick for cleaning out square plug holes. I also packed a cordless drill and a ROS along with my PPE.

I am looking forward to learning some new woodworking skills and hopefully coming away from the week with a nice chair. After that, I will be into chair production.
I'm looking forward to this class, always good to learn new skills.

Skully- We were not asked to bring any MDF or plywood to make routing templates and jigs, but I'm hoping to get full size tracings of all of the jigs so I can reproduce them when I return home.

PPK- That is a good question. I like the Gamble house chair, but I like the Thorsen chair better. If you Google the Thorsen chairs you will see they have a different style crest rail and the back slats fit into a lower rail which is different from the Gamble chairs. So I'm on the fence at this point.
 

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Material Preparation

Now that my Thorsen inspired dining table is complete (you can see the BLOG here), it is time to turn my attention to a set of chairs. Since I have never built a chair, I decided to enroll in the Gamble House Side Chair class at Marc Adams School of Woodworking in Indiana. Many will know the instructor, Bob Lang, who is not only a Lumber Jocks member but has authored several books and was editor of Popular Woodworking magazine for many years. The chair design is based on the side chairs in the living room of the Gamble house in Pasadena.

The school mailed out a cut list a few weeks ago so students could prepare the required stock prior to class. I had enough sapele left over from making the dining table, so there was no need for a trip to the hardwood dealer. Since Indiana is about a 10 hour drive from Eastern Pennsylvania, I decided to cut up enough material to make two complete chairs to be sure I had sufficient material to cover any mistakes.

Wood Floor Flooring Wood stain Hardwood


With my stock cut, I gathered up the required tools for class. This includes square chisels, a Dozuki saw, a plastic head hammer for inserting ebony plugs and a dental pick for cleaning out square plug holes. I also packed a cordless drill and a ROS along with my PPE.

I am looking forward to learning some new woodworking skills and hopefully coming away from the week with a nice chair. After that, I will be into chair production.
This looks like a really interesting blog-I'll definitely follow along again!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Marc Adams School, Day 1

Today was day one of the six day Gamble House side chair class at the Marc Adams school of Woodworking in Indiana. After 10 hours driving from Eastern Pennsylvania, I was happy to get a good night rest last evening and get started on this chair. Marc has a very large school and there are at least four classes going on simultaneously.

Our instructor, Bob Lang, was asked to fill in for George Knutson who was unable to teach the class as originally planned. Bob was able to get the original CAD files from Darrel Peart which he then used to create a 3D model of the chair in Sketch Up. This allowed Bob to check all of the joinery, etc. before we started cutting material. Bob changed a few dimensions from the original cut list, but not everyone received the update (including me). A few of my pieces are slightly different sizes from what Bob has drawn, but I think I can work around this.

After the obligatory shop safety discussion, we started by creating the routing template for the front apron, which has a cloud lift along the bottom. Once the template was completed, I routed the apron and cut my front legs to length.

Wood Rectangle Flooring Floor Wood stain


The chair uses loose tenon joinery. To cut the mortises we set up the JDS Multi-router.

Engineering Gas Machine Artisan Engineer


After cutting my mortises, I made up some tenon stock, then cut a few lengths so I could do a dry fit.

Rectangle Wood Door mat Grey Wood stain


The front leg assembly is as far as I can take it at this point.

Wood Rectangle Table Plant Floor


The back leg assembly requires four templates. The legs have a gentle arched shape above the seat. The crest rail is shaped with both a curve and a profile, and the rear apron also has a unique, almost scalloped profile that requires a template. Bob Lang was kind enough to plot full size drawings that we were able to affix to the MDF to facilitate making the templates.

Wood Automotive design Table Flooring Hardwood


Tomorrow we will continue making the back leg assembly.
 

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Marc Adams School, Day 1

Today was day one of the six day Gamble House side chair class at the Marc Adams school of Woodworking in Indiana. After 10 hours driving from Eastern Pennsylvania, I was happy to get a good night rest last evening and get started on this chair. Marc has a very large school and there are at least four classes going on simultaneously.

Our instructor, Bob Lang, was asked to fill in for George Knutson who was unable to teach the class as originally planned. Bob was able to get the original CAD files from Darrel Peart which he then used to create a 3D model of the chair in Sketch Up. This allowed Bob to check all of the joinery, etc. before we started cutting material. Bob changed a few dimensions from the original cut list, but not everyone received the update (including me). A few of my pieces are slightly different sizes from what Bob has drawn, but I think I can work around this.

After the obligatory shop safety discussion, we started by creating the routing template for the front apron, which has a cloud lift along the bottom. Once the template was completed, I routed the apron and cut my front legs to length.

Wood Rectangle Flooring Floor Wood stain


The chair uses loose tenon joinery. To cut the mortises we set up the JDS Multi-router.

Engineering Gas Machine Artisan Engineer


After cutting my mortises, I made up some tenon stock, then cut a few lengths so I could do a dry fit.

Rectangle Wood Door mat Grey Wood stain


The front leg assembly is as far as I can take it at this point.

Wood Rectangle Table Plant Floor


The back leg assembly requires four templates. The legs have a gentle arched shape above the seat. The crest rail is shaped with both a curve and a profile, and the rear apron also has a unique, almost scalloped profile that requires a template. Bob Lang was kind enough to plot full size drawings that we were able to affix to the MDF to facilitate making the templates.

Wood Automotive design Table Flooring Hardwood


Tomorrow we will continue making the back leg assembly.
this is a journey im looking forward to,i love g&g design and really want to do more of it in the future so i thank you for your great blogs.id love to go this school some day,although we have another great school close to me here which is the wiliiam ing school.see ya tomorrow.
 

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Marc Adams School, Day 1

Today was day one of the six day Gamble House side chair class at the Marc Adams school of Woodworking in Indiana. After 10 hours driving from Eastern Pennsylvania, I was happy to get a good night rest last evening and get started on this chair. Marc has a very large school and there are at least four classes going on simultaneously.

Our instructor, Bob Lang, was asked to fill in for George Knutson who was unable to teach the class as originally planned. Bob was able to get the original CAD files from Darrel Peart which he then used to create a 3D model of the chair in Sketch Up. This allowed Bob to check all of the joinery, etc. before we started cutting material. Bob changed a few dimensions from the original cut list, but not everyone received the update (including me). A few of my pieces are slightly different sizes from what Bob has drawn, but I think I can work around this.

After the obligatory shop safety discussion, we started by creating the routing template for the front apron, which has a cloud lift along the bottom. Once the template was completed, I routed the apron and cut my front legs to length.

Wood Rectangle Flooring Floor Wood stain


The chair uses loose tenon joinery. To cut the mortises we set up the JDS Multi-router.

Engineering Gas Machine Artisan Engineer


After cutting my mortises, I made up some tenon stock, then cut a few lengths so I could do a dry fit.

Rectangle Wood Door mat Grey Wood stain


The front leg assembly is as far as I can take it at this point.

Wood Rectangle Table Plant Floor


The back leg assembly requires four templates. The legs have a gentle arched shape above the seat. The crest rail is shaped with both a curve and a profile, and the rear apron also has a unique, almost scalloped profile that requires a template. Bob Lang was kind enough to plot full size drawings that we were able to affix to the MDF to facilitate making the templates.

Wood Automotive design Table Flooring Hardwood


Tomorrow we will continue making the back leg assembly.
This is awesome! I'm glad to hear you're making templates for your other chairs when you get home. Very cool! I was wondering why Bob wasn't listed as one of the instructors on the website. Nothing against Mr. Knutson, but I'd be very happy with this substitute teacher. I've been a huge fan of Bob's since I got his books at Gamble House.

I may have to look into this school as another option. It seems like they've got a good program. I've always just looked at Ng's. It would be nice to have a choice, although the tradeoff was taking my family to Disneyland while I'm in Anaheim. Hmmm…
 

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Marc Adams School, Day 1

Today was day one of the six day Gamble House side chair class at the Marc Adams school of Woodworking in Indiana. After 10 hours driving from Eastern Pennsylvania, I was happy to get a good night rest last evening and get started on this chair. Marc has a very large school and there are at least four classes going on simultaneously.

Our instructor, Bob Lang, was asked to fill in for George Knutson who was unable to teach the class as originally planned. Bob was able to get the original CAD files from Darrel Peart which he then used to create a 3D model of the chair in Sketch Up. This allowed Bob to check all of the joinery, etc. before we started cutting material. Bob changed a few dimensions from the original cut list, but not everyone received the update (including me). A few of my pieces are slightly different sizes from what Bob has drawn, but I think I can work around this.

After the obligatory shop safety discussion, we started by creating the routing template for the front apron, which has a cloud lift along the bottom. Once the template was completed, I routed the apron and cut my front legs to length.

Wood Rectangle Flooring Floor Wood stain


The chair uses loose tenon joinery. To cut the mortises we set up the JDS Multi-router.

Engineering Gas Machine Artisan Engineer


After cutting my mortises, I made up some tenon stock, then cut a few lengths so I could do a dry fit.

Rectangle Wood Door mat Grey Wood stain


The front leg assembly is as far as I can take it at this point.

Wood Rectangle Table Plant Floor


The back leg assembly requires four templates. The legs have a gentle arched shape above the seat. The crest rail is shaped with both a curve and a profile, and the rear apron also has a unique, almost scalloped profile that requires a template. Bob Lang was kind enough to plot full size drawings that we were able to affix to the MDF to facilitate making the templates.

Wood Automotive design Table Flooring Hardwood


Tomorrow we will continue making the back leg assembly.
Thanks for posting the daily news. Looks like they some nice high end toys (errr tools) there. How does the multi router stack up against the Leigh mortise and tenon jig? Full sized templates are the only way to go when you have to make pieces with curves like that. They will really make things move a lot faster with the other 11 chairs when you get home.

Yep, I'm officially Greene & Greene with envy.
 

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Marc Adams School, Day 1

Today was day one of the six day Gamble House side chair class at the Marc Adams school of Woodworking in Indiana. After 10 hours driving from Eastern Pennsylvania, I was happy to get a good night rest last evening and get started on this chair. Marc has a very large school and there are at least four classes going on simultaneously.

Our instructor, Bob Lang, was asked to fill in for George Knutson who was unable to teach the class as originally planned. Bob was able to get the original CAD files from Darrel Peart which he then used to create a 3D model of the chair in Sketch Up. This allowed Bob to check all of the joinery, etc. before we started cutting material. Bob changed a few dimensions from the original cut list, but not everyone received the update (including me). A few of my pieces are slightly different sizes from what Bob has drawn, but I think I can work around this.

After the obligatory shop safety discussion, we started by creating the routing template for the front apron, which has a cloud lift along the bottom. Once the template was completed, I routed the apron and cut my front legs to length.

Wood Rectangle Flooring Floor Wood stain


The chair uses loose tenon joinery. To cut the mortises we set up the JDS Multi-router.

Engineering Gas Machine Artisan Engineer


After cutting my mortises, I made up some tenon stock, then cut a few lengths so I could do a dry fit.

Rectangle Wood Door mat Grey Wood stain


The front leg assembly is as far as I can take it at this point.

Wood Rectangle Table Plant Floor


The back leg assembly requires four templates. The legs have a gentle arched shape above the seat. The crest rail is shaped with both a curve and a profile, and the rear apron also has a unique, almost scalloped profile that requires a template. Bob Lang was kind enough to plot full size drawings that we were able to affix to the MDF to facilitate making the templates.

Wood Automotive design Table Flooring Hardwood


Tomorrow we will continue making the back leg assembly.
Looks like you're off to a great start! Looking forward to seeing your progress!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Marc Adams School, Day 1

Today was day one of the six day Gamble House side chair class at the Marc Adams school of Woodworking in Indiana. After 10 hours driving from Eastern Pennsylvania, I was happy to get a good night rest last evening and get started on this chair. Marc has a very large school and there are at least four classes going on simultaneously.

Our instructor, Bob Lang, was asked to fill in for George Knutson who was unable to teach the class as originally planned. Bob was able to get the original CAD files from Darrel Peart which he then used to create a 3D model of the chair in Sketch Up. This allowed Bob to check all of the joinery, etc. before we started cutting material. Bob changed a few dimensions from the original cut list, but not everyone received the update (including me). A few of my pieces are slightly different sizes from what Bob has drawn, but I think I can work around this.

After the obligatory shop safety discussion, we started by creating the routing template for the front apron, which has a cloud lift along the bottom. Once the template was completed, I routed the apron and cut my front legs to length.

Wood Rectangle Flooring Floor Wood stain


The chair uses loose tenon joinery. To cut the mortises we set up the JDS Multi-router.

Engineering Gas Machine Artisan Engineer


After cutting my mortises, I made up some tenon stock, then cut a few lengths so I could do a dry fit.

Rectangle Wood Door mat Grey Wood stain


The front leg assembly is as far as I can take it at this point.

Wood Rectangle Table Plant Floor


The back leg assembly requires four templates. The legs have a gentle arched shape above the seat. The crest rail is shaped with both a curve and a profile, and the rear apron also has a unique, almost scalloped profile that requires a template. Bob Lang was kind enough to plot full size drawings that we were able to affix to the MDF to facilitate making the templates.

Wood Automotive design Table Flooring Hardwood


Tomorrow we will continue making the back leg assembly.
Pottz - William Ng's school looks awesome too, would love to build one of the Blacker chairs some day. but not 12…

Skully - Bob Lang is filling in for George. Unfortunately he was not able to teach the class but Marc Adams was able to get Bob to fill in at the last minute. Kudos to Bob for taking this on, he had to do a lot of prep work in a short period of time including developing a full 3D model in SketchUp, dimensioned 3 views, full size templates and written work instructions.

Earl - Marc's shop is well equipped. I would not hesitate to recommend a class here to anyone. Mostly Powermatic machinery with a smattering of Delta, General, etc.. I was happy to get to try out the new 15" PM bandsaw as that is likely my next purchase. The multi-router is a fantastic piece of equipment, but the Leigh FMT is very nice as well. The nice feature of the multi-router is that the router is mounted to the machine and there is a third axis of motion to control it. With the Leigh FMT the operator has to move the router manually. Both make excellent joints however and so far I see no reason that the Leigh jig will not work just fine for these chairs.
 

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Marc Adams School, Day 1

Today was day one of the six day Gamble House side chair class at the Marc Adams school of Woodworking in Indiana. After 10 hours driving from Eastern Pennsylvania, I was happy to get a good night rest last evening and get started on this chair. Marc has a very large school and there are at least four classes going on simultaneously.

Our instructor, Bob Lang, was asked to fill in for George Knutson who was unable to teach the class as originally planned. Bob was able to get the original CAD files from Darrel Peart which he then used to create a 3D model of the chair in Sketch Up. This allowed Bob to check all of the joinery, etc. before we started cutting material. Bob changed a few dimensions from the original cut list, but not everyone received the update (including me). A few of my pieces are slightly different sizes from what Bob has drawn, but I think I can work around this.

After the obligatory shop safety discussion, we started by creating the routing template for the front apron, which has a cloud lift along the bottom. Once the template was completed, I routed the apron and cut my front legs to length.



The chair uses loose tenon joinery. To cut the mortises we set up the JDS Multi-router.



After cutting my mortises, I made up some tenon stock, then cut a few lengths so I could do a dry fit.



The front leg assembly is as far as I can take it at this point.



The back leg assembly requires four templates. The legs have a gentle arched shape above the seat. The crest rail is shaped with both a curve and a profile, and the rear apron also has a unique, almost scalloped profile that requires a template. Bob Lang was kind enough to plot full size drawings that we were able to affix to the MDF to facilitate making the templates.



Tomorrow we will continue making the back leg assembly.
The cool thing about woodworking is that you can spend $2K on wood and $3K on tools and make $12K worth of chairs! Especially once you have all the templates made and you made the "prototype" under adult supervision, you can crank out the other chairs mass-production-style! This is how I justify purchases to the Mrs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Marc Adams School, Day 2

Today we continued to work on the components for the back leg assembly. After tracing the outline of the components on the sapele using the templates, I roughed out the parts on the bandsaw. There is a significant amount of bandsaw work just in the parts for the back assembly alone.

Wood Hardwood Table Lumber Flooring


The crest rail is the most time consuming part to make. The mortises for the floating tenons were made first using the multi-router, while the part was still square. Next, I affixed the template to the blank with double sided tape. Using a Forstner bit, I bored holes where there was an inside radius. After the holes were bored through, I cut the curves for the front and back of the piece on the bandsaw, then taped the offcuts back in place to bandsaw the profile.

Wood Gas Auto part Musical instrument Plywood


The back apron also has a profile which I roughed out on the bandsaw as well. Even in the rough bandsawn state, the parts are starting to take shape nicely.

Wood Brick Building material Composite material Rectangle


I began smoothing the parts with a spokeshave and block plane before moving on to final cleanup using my ROS.

Wood Rectangle Automotive exterior Composite material Flooring


Tomorrow we will continue getting the back leg components fabricated and ready for assembly.
 

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Marc Adams School, Day 2

Today we continued to work on the components for the back leg assembly. After tracing the outline of the components on the sapele using the templates, I roughed out the parts on the bandsaw. There is a significant amount of bandsaw work just in the parts for the back assembly alone.

Wood Hardwood Table Lumber Flooring


The crest rail is the most time consuming part to make. The mortises for the floating tenons were made first using the multi-router, while the part was still square. Next, I affixed the template to the blank with double sided tape. Using a Forstner bit, I bored holes where there was an inside radius. After the holes were bored through, I cut the curves for the front and back of the piece on the bandsaw, then taped the offcuts back in place to bandsaw the profile.

Wood Gas Auto part Musical instrument Plywood


The back apron also has a profile which I roughed out on the bandsaw as well. Even in the rough bandsawn state, the parts are starting to take shape nicely.

Wood Brick Building material Composite material Rectangle


I began smoothing the parts with a spokeshave and block plane before moving on to final cleanup using my ROS.

Wood Rectangle Automotive exterior Composite material Flooring


Tomorrow we will continue getting the back leg components fabricated and ready for assembly.
That is a considerable amount of work to complete just one piece of the chair. Still, it helps to see the steps of the process for future reference and not having to figure out the sequence on your own. Very timely blog for me to read since I will be making chairs for my desks later this winter. I can see that the plans will need to be fully developed before starting to reduce the chance of making major mistakes.
 

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Marc Adams School, Day 2

Today we continued to work on the components for the back leg assembly. After tracing the outline of the components on the sapele using the templates, I roughed out the parts on the bandsaw. There is a significant amount of bandsaw work just in the parts for the back assembly alone.

Wood Hardwood Table Lumber Flooring


The crest rail is the most time consuming part to make. The mortises for the floating tenons were made first using the multi-router, while the part was still square. Next, I affixed the template to the blank with double sided tape. Using a Forstner bit, I bored holes where there was an inside radius. After the holes were bored through, I cut the curves for the front and back of the piece on the bandsaw, then taped the offcuts back in place to bandsaw the profile.

Wood Gas Auto part Musical instrument Plywood


The back apron also has a profile which I roughed out on the bandsaw as well. Even in the rough bandsawn state, the parts are starting to take shape nicely.

Wood Brick Building material Composite material Rectangle


I began smoothing the parts with a spokeshave and block plane before moving on to final cleanup using my ROS.

Wood Rectangle Automotive exterior Composite material Flooring


Tomorrow we will continue getting the back leg components fabricated and ready for assembly.
yeah i think when people look at a g&g piece of furniture for the first time they dont realize how much work goes into it.it looks like it would be simple but far from it,but very enjoyable to make.i definitly want to do more in the future.wish i was there with ya tung.
 

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Marc Adams School, Day 2

Today we continued to work on the components for the back leg assembly. After tracing the outline of the components on the sapele using the templates, I roughed out the parts on the bandsaw. There is a significant amount of bandsaw work just in the parts for the back assembly alone.

Wood Hardwood Table Lumber Flooring


The crest rail is the most time consuming part to make. The mortises for the floating tenons were made first using the multi-router, while the part was still square. Next, I affixed the template to the blank with double sided tape. Using a Forstner bit, I bored holes where there was an inside radius. After the holes were bored through, I cut the curves for the front and back of the piece on the bandsaw, then taped the offcuts back in place to bandsaw the profile.

Wood Gas Auto part Musical instrument Plywood


The back apron also has a profile which I roughed out on the bandsaw as well. Even in the rough bandsawn state, the parts are starting to take shape nicely.

Wood Brick Building material Composite material Rectangle


I began smoothing the parts with a spokeshave and block plane before moving on to final cleanup using my ROS.

Wood Rectangle Automotive exterior Composite material Flooring


Tomorrow we will continue getting the back leg components fabricated and ready for assembly.
I wonder what Peter and John Hall would think of the way their chairs are fabricated these days?

Anyone got a DeLorean we could use to bring them here….......?!
 

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18,919 Posts
Marc Adams School, Day 2

Today we continued to work on the components for the back leg assembly. After tracing the outline of the components on the sapele using the templates, I roughed out the parts on the bandsaw. There is a significant amount of bandsaw work just in the parts for the back assembly alone.

Wood Hardwood Table Lumber Flooring


The crest rail is the most time consuming part to make. The mortises for the floating tenons were made first using the multi-router, while the part was still square. Next, I affixed the template to the blank with double sided tape. Using a Forstner bit, I bored holes where there was an inside radius. After the holes were bored through, I cut the curves for the front and back of the piece on the bandsaw, then taped the offcuts back in place to bandsaw the profile.

Wood Gas Auto part Musical instrument Plywood


The back apron also has a profile which I roughed out on the bandsaw as well. Even in the rough bandsawn state, the parts are starting to take shape nicely.

Wood Brick Building material Composite material Rectangle


I began smoothing the parts with a spokeshave and block plane before moving on to final cleanup using my ROS.

Wood Rectangle Automotive exterior Composite material Flooring


Tomorrow we will continue getting the back leg components fabricated and ready for assembly.
I wonder what Peter and John Hall would think of the way their chairs are fabricated these days?

Anyone got a DeLorean we could use to bring them here….......?!

- Mean_Dean
i think they would love to see what modern tools and materials have done for there furniture.i think if they had todays tools they would have used used them,although probably still incorparating some hand tool use.look at what they accomplished with what they had,and think about what they could do today.who wouldnt ?.
 

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