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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The process begins...

Greene and Greene Accents on a Craftsman Style Barstool - a batch of 8

Photobucket
So begins my blog on these G~n~G barstools. I spent about 8 months (part time) working on these-from design to done - and would hate to guess the actual time per stool. I had a lot of learning curves with new techniques. The places I tried to incorporate the Greene and Greene accents; fading indent, bull-nosed feet, stepped footrest, the pillowed plugs and the scalloped crest rail forming a tsuba. It's hard to put in enough accents to make the piece look sophisticated without going overboard on the thing. If you're going ugh~ the oak is to white for the ebony plugs, the chairs are just done and ready for the ammonia fume tent, the oak will darken dramatically and the ebony will compliment the color well - I've done some experimenting and it's a nice contrast.

Photobucket
I used White Oak because that's our local favorite. I built these for my good friends and most of their furniture is also done in fumed white oak.
I'm starting the blog as I complete building the set of eight, but before I've fumed and finished or carved the seats.

Photobucket
I'll put them in the fume tent tomorrow and let them cook for 32 hours in 32% ammonia. Then I'll start with the finish - a tedious little artistic undertaking in itself!

The Project:

First I designed the stool in Sketchup http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehouse/details?mid=da0e921b615310467d9ca9bd7f5026ba , printed out a set of plans and commenced to building a prototype http://lumberjocks.com/projects/20339 . I posted the proto and got some good feedback from a lot of Jocks to adjust for the finals.
Next was Jigs and parts….lotsa lotsa parts.

Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
I'll try and go through the whole process. Thank God I talked Cronk into cutting all the rough stock - I really hate that part -

Photobucket
I'll be back with the leg and jig construction…

Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
 

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Registered
Joined
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8,904 Posts
The process begins...

Greene and Greene Accents on a Craftsman Style Barstool - a batch of 8

Photobucket
So begins my blog on these G~n~G barstools. I spent about 8 months (part time) working on these-from design to done - and would hate to guess the actual time per stool. I had a lot of learning curves with new techniques. The places I tried to incorporate the Greene and Greene accents; fading indent, bull-nosed feet, stepped footrest, the pillowed plugs and the scalloped crest rail forming a tsuba. It's hard to put in enough accents to make the piece look sophisticated without going overboard on the thing. If you're going ugh~ the oak is to white for the ebony plugs, the chairs are just done and ready for the ammonia fume tent, the oak will darken dramatically and the ebony will compliment the color well - I've done some experimenting and it's a nice contrast.

Photobucket
I used White Oak because that's our local favorite. I built these for my good friends and most of their furniture is also done in fumed white oak.
I'm starting the blog as I complete building the set of eight, but before I've fumed and finished or carved the seats.

Photobucket
I'll put them in the fume tent tomorrow and let them cook for 32 hours in 32% ammonia. Then I'll start with the finish - a tedious little artistic undertaking in itself!

The Project:

First I designed the stool in Sketchup http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehouse/details?mid=da0e921b615310467d9ca9bd7f5026ba , printed out a set of plans and commenced to building a prototype http://lumberjocks.com/projects/20339 . I posted the proto and got some good feedback from a lot of Jocks to adjust for the finals.
Next was Jigs and parts….lotsa lotsa parts.

Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
I'll try and go through the whole process. Thank God I talked Cronk into cutting all the rough stock - I really hate that part -

Photobucket
I'll be back with the leg and jig construction…

Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
An excellent design. Looks well proportioned and respectful to the style.

I look forward to seeing your work - as I always do:)
 

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Registered
Joined
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6,864 Posts
The process begins...

Greene and Greene Accents on a Craftsman Style Barstool - a batch of 8

Photobucket
So begins my blog on these G~n~G barstools. I spent about 8 months (part time) working on these-from design to done - and would hate to guess the actual time per stool. I had a lot of learning curves with new techniques. The places I tried to incorporate the Greene and Greene accents; fading indent, bull-nosed feet, stepped footrest, the pillowed plugs and the scalloped crest rail forming a tsuba. It's hard to put in enough accents to make the piece look sophisticated without going overboard on the thing. If you're going ugh~ the oak is to white for the ebony plugs, the chairs are just done and ready for the ammonia fume tent, the oak will darken dramatically and the ebony will compliment the color well - I've done some experimenting and it's a nice contrast.

Photobucket
I used White Oak because that's our local favorite. I built these for my good friends and most of their furniture is also done in fumed white oak.
I'm starting the blog as I complete building the set of eight, but before I've fumed and finished or carved the seats.

Photobucket
I'll put them in the fume tent tomorrow and let them cook for 32 hours in 32% ammonia. Then I'll start with the finish - a tedious little artistic undertaking in itself!

The Project:

First I designed the stool in Sketchup http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehouse/details?mid=da0e921b615310467d9ca9bd7f5026ba , printed out a set of plans and commenced to building a prototype http://lumberjocks.com/projects/20339 . I posted the proto and got some good feedback from a lot of Jocks to adjust for the finals.
Next was Jigs and parts….lotsa lotsa parts.

Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
I'll try and go through the whole process. Thank God I talked Cronk into cutting all the rough stock - I really hate that part -

Photobucket
I'll be back with the leg and jig construction…

Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
Your timing is excellent. I too have been working on a stool design for a loooong time. I ended up styling mine to go with our kitchen chairs. I recently discovered G&G and gave serious consideration to redesigning with that in mind, but decided to stay with the design I had. I have built one proto for scale and size and have bought my lumber. Still working on a few design details. I'll be looking forward to following your blog!
 

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Registered
Joined
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1,636 Posts
The process begins...

Greene and Greene Accents on a Craftsman Style Barstool - a batch of 8

Photobucket
So begins my blog on these G~n~G barstools. I spent about 8 months (part time) working on these-from design to done - and would hate to guess the actual time per stool. I had a lot of learning curves with new techniques. The places I tried to incorporate the Greene and Greene accents; fading indent, bull-nosed feet, stepped footrest, the pillowed plugs and the scalloped crest rail forming a tsuba. It's hard to put in enough accents to make the piece look sophisticated without going overboard on the thing. If you're going ugh~ the oak is to white for the ebony plugs, the chairs are just done and ready for the ammonia fume tent, the oak will darken dramatically and the ebony will compliment the color well - I've done some experimenting and it's a nice contrast.

Photobucket
I used White Oak because that's our local favorite. I built these for my good friends and most of their furniture is also done in fumed white oak.
I'm starting the blog as I complete building the set of eight, but before I've fumed and finished or carved the seats.

Photobucket
I'll put them in the fume tent tomorrow and let them cook for 32 hours in 32% ammonia. Then I'll start with the finish - a tedious little artistic undertaking in itself!

The Project:

First I designed the stool in Sketchup http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehouse/details?mid=da0e921b615310467d9ca9bd7f5026ba , printed out a set of plans and commenced to building a prototype http://lumberjocks.com/projects/20339 . I posted the proto and got some good feedback from a lot of Jocks to adjust for the finals.
Next was Jigs and parts….lotsa lotsa parts.

Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
I'll try and go through the whole process. Thank God I talked Cronk into cutting all the rough stock - I really hate that part -

Photobucket
I'll be back with the leg and jig construction…

Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
Dude, these are unbelievable! I totally missed the tsuba on the prototype. Nicely done. Once again, you proved why you were my first LJ Buddy. Can't wait for the next installment. Instant Favorite, as usual.
 

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Registered
Joined
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118,619 Posts
The process begins...

Greene and Greene Accents on a Craftsman Style Barstool - a batch of 8

Photobucket
So begins my blog on these G~n~G barstools. I spent about 8 months (part time) working on these-from design to done - and would hate to guess the actual time per stool. I had a lot of learning curves with new techniques. The places I tried to incorporate the Greene and Greene accents; fading indent, bull-nosed feet, stepped footrest, the pillowed plugs and the scalloped crest rail forming a tsuba. It's hard to put in enough accents to make the piece look sophisticated without going overboard on the thing. If you're going ugh~ the oak is to white for the ebony plugs, the chairs are just done and ready for the ammonia fume tent, the oak will darken dramatically and the ebony will compliment the color well - I've done some experimenting and it's a nice contrast.

Photobucket
I used White Oak because that's our local favorite. I built these for my good friends and most of their furniture is also done in fumed white oak.
I'm starting the blog as I complete building the set of eight, but before I've fumed and finished or carved the seats.

Photobucket
I'll put them in the fume tent tomorrow and let them cook for 32 hours in 32% ammonia. Then I'll start with the finish - a tedious little artistic undertaking in itself!

The Project:

First I designed the stool in Sketchup http://sketchup.google.com/3dwarehouse/details?mid=da0e921b615310467d9ca9bd7f5026ba , printed out a set of plans and commenced to building a prototype http://lumberjocks.com/projects/20339 . I posted the proto and got some good feedback from a lot of Jocks to adjust for the finals.
Next was Jigs and parts….lotsa lotsa parts.

Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
I'll try and go through the whole process. Thank God I talked Cronk into cutting all the rough stock - I really hate that part -

Photobucket
I'll be back with the leg and jig construction…

Photobucket
Photobucket
Photobucket
A super project for a blog and a great start.
 

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713 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Legs and Jigs - Lessons Learned

Greene and Greene / Craftsman Barstools - Part Due
At this point I have all the parts cut out and am pattern routing the back legs. Unfortunately, I have no formal training and have to re-invent the wheel with every step. I cut a blank for the back legs on the band saw staying ~ 1/16" outside my line. I built a jig to pattern it with a lower bearing bit. Route one side - then switch to the other side, ala Taige Freid style - I kept having problems with the second cut being shy of the pattern ….problem: I had final size on both sides of the jig - not correct! - (for those of you who haven't done this before), MAKE one side just fit the pattern and route to final size on the other side - I can't believe it took me 15 legs to figure this out!!! More sanding for me….
Here is a rendering of the jig (rough - without the hold downs) reference and register only one side - make the other side fit the jig - nuff said!

Photobucket

Photobucket
Once the front and back legs are cut out to final size, I referenced a layout on a master pair and cut each mortise dutifully and repetitively - Once you start, don't stop until they are all done, the less times you set up, the more accurate the final.

Photobucket


Photobucket
Photobucket

It pays to cut some filler blocks for mortising the 45 corners - The blocks will hold the wood and keep the bit from tearing on the adjoining mortise.

Photobucket
Next is the Stiles and Rails….
 

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35,383 Posts
Legs and Jigs - Lessons Learned

Greene and Greene / Craftsman Barstools - Part Due
At this point I have all the parts cut out and am pattern routing the back legs. Unfortunately, I have no formal training and have to re-invent the wheel with every step. I cut a blank for the back legs on the band saw staying ~ 1/16" outside my line. I built a jig to pattern it with a lower bearing bit. Route one side - then switch to the other side, ala Taige Freid style - I kept having problems with the second cut being shy of the pattern ….problem: I had final size on both sides of the jig - not correct! - (for those of you who haven't done this before), MAKE one side just fit the pattern and route to final size on the other side - I can't believe it took me 15 legs to figure this out!!! More sanding for me….
Here is a rendering of the jig (rough - without the hold downs) reference and register only one side - make the other side fit the jig - nuff said!

Photobucket

Photobucket
Once the front and back legs are cut out to final size, I referenced a layout on a master pair and cut each mortise dutifully and repetitively - Once you start, don't stop until they are all done, the less times you set up, the more accurate the final.

Photobucket


Photobucket
Photobucket

It pays to cut some filler blocks for mortising the 45 corners - The blocks will hold the wood and keep the bit from tearing on the adjoining mortise.

Photobucket
Next is the Stiles and Rails….
Schroeder. Some great insites on Pattern Routing.
 

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6,894 Posts
Legs and Jigs - Lessons Learned

Greene and Greene / Craftsman Barstools - Part Due
At this point I have all the parts cut out and am pattern routing the back legs. Unfortunately, I have no formal training and have to re-invent the wheel with every step. I cut a blank for the back legs on the band saw staying ~ 1/16" outside my line. I built a jig to pattern it with a lower bearing bit. Route one side - then switch to the other side, ala Taige Freid style - I kept having problems with the second cut being shy of the pattern ….problem: I had final size on both sides of the jig - not correct! - (for those of you who haven't done this before), MAKE one side just fit the pattern and route to final size on the other side - I can't believe it took me 15 legs to figure this out!!! More sanding for me….
Here is a rendering of the jig (rough - without the hold downs) reference and register only one side - make the other side fit the jig - nuff said!

Photobucket

Photobucket
Once the front and back legs are cut out to final size, I referenced a layout on a master pair and cut each mortise dutifully and repetitively - Once you start, don't stop until they are all done, the less times you set up, the more accurate the final.

Photobucket


Photobucket
Photobucket

It pays to cut some filler blocks for mortising the 45 corners - The blocks will hold the wood and keep the bit from tearing on the adjoining mortise.

Photobucket
Next is the Stiles and Rails….
Hi Schroeder,

That formal training thing is over rated!

Only 15? That's not too bad! Probably would have taken me much longer than that.

It's quite a project

Lee
 
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