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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thinking through the Design & Dimensions

Rectangle Font Parallel Slope Diagram


My mother suggested that I make a picture frame for my grandmother's 100th birthday. The party is in march, and the four of us (Stephanie, Beatrice, Elijah, and I) will be flying to New York. I looked online for table saw frames because I do not have much skil with or many bits for a router, and no router table.

What I found was:
Brown Rectangle Wood Font Material property


http://americanwoodworker.com/blogs/projects/archive/2009/12/04/tablesaw-picture-frame.aspx

This is a lovely and classic frame. The wood is beautiful. However, I think for a smaller frame and considering my Grandmother's style (which is more modern than my own), I will edge glue some walnut and hard maple.

I will edge glue them with the walnut ouitside and smaller (a 3:2 ratio).

After a visit to Goodwill, I found that no one make the picture frame opening the exact size of a standard picture (5×7), but they rather undersize it a bit and allow the rest of the picture to be hidden, and also to be held in by a rabbet on the back side.

Therefore the dimensions of the frame will be:

Opening (amount of 5×7 picture viewable): 4 1/2×6 1/2

Length of mitered sides from longest corners: 7" and 9"

Rabbet on back: 3/8 deep & 1/4 wide.

Thickness of edge glued wood: Total: 1 1/4"
Outer walnut: 1/2"
Inner maple: 3/4"

When doing calculations, such as for the opening, I have to take into account the fact that if the frame opening is 5.5, the picture will loose a 1/4" on each side, not a half inch on each side. That is how I arrive at the rabbet width.

I arrive at the length of the frame itself by continuing the line from the opening to the outer edge of the frame. I draw in the miter line and knowing the thickness, that gives me a right triangle with 2 equal sides 1 1/4". So I just add 1 1/4 twice (for each mitered edge) )to 4.5 & 6.5 (the opening).

I arrived at the thickeness of the maple and walnut by seeing the 1 1/4" can fit nicely into 5 quarter inches and divided it up from there.

The rabbet depth I got from the site I mentioned above, and the width (1/4") from what remained of the 5×7 photo after the opening dimensions.

Finally, I found a craftsman molding cutter head with 11 cutters. I will use this to give it a nice molding profile. I have selected a profile which has a straight edge for half of it, than a protruding ovalo and than a higher round and than a flat spot. I shall call it flowerflat.

Next entry: Gluing up stock and making a zero clearance insert for the molding cutters, and generally getting an orderly process in my head for all that will follow.

Comments Welcome!
 

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Thinking through the Design & Dimensions

Rectangle Font Parallel Slope Diagram


My mother suggested that I make a picture frame for my grandmother's 100th birthday. The party is in march, and the four of us (Stephanie, Beatrice, Elijah, and I) will be flying to New York. I looked online for table saw frames because I do not have much skil with or many bits for a router, and no router table.

What I found was:
Brown Rectangle Wood Font Material property


http://americanwoodworker.com/blogs/projects/archive/2009/12/04/tablesaw-picture-frame.aspx

This is a lovely and classic frame. The wood is beautiful. However, I think for a smaller frame and considering my Grandmother's style (which is more modern than my own), I will edge glue some walnut and hard maple.

I will edge glue them with the walnut ouitside and smaller (a 3:2 ratio).

After a visit to Goodwill, I found that no one make the picture frame opening the exact size of a standard picture (5×7), but they rather undersize it a bit and allow the rest of the picture to be hidden, and also to be held in by a rabbet on the back side.

Therefore the dimensions of the frame will be:

Opening (amount of 5×7 picture viewable): 4 1/2×6 1/2

Length of mitered sides from longest corners: 7" and 9"

Rabbet on back: 3/8 deep & 1/4 wide.

Thickness of edge glued wood: Total: 1 1/4"
Outer walnut: 1/2"
Inner maple: 3/4"

When doing calculations, such as for the opening, I have to take into account the fact that if the frame opening is 5.5, the picture will loose a 1/4" on each side, not a half inch on each side. That is how I arrive at the rabbet width.

I arrive at the length of the frame itself by continuing the line from the opening to the outer edge of the frame. I draw in the miter line and knowing the thickness, that gives me a right triangle with 2 equal sides 1 1/4". So I just add 1 1/4 twice (for each mitered edge) )to 4.5 & 6.5 (the opening).

I arrived at the thickeness of the maple and walnut by seeing the 1 1/4" can fit nicely into 5 quarter inches and divided it up from there.

The rabbet depth I got from the site I mentioned above, and the width (1/4") from what remained of the 5×7 photo after the opening dimensions.

Finally, I found a craftsman molding cutter head with 11 cutters. I will use this to give it a nice molding profile. I have selected a profile which has a straight edge for half of it, than a protruding ovalo and than a higher round and than a flat spot. I shall call it flowerflat.

Next entry: Gluing up stock and making a zero clearance insert for the molding cutters, and generally getting an orderly process in my head for all that will follow.

Comments Welcome!
Something you might want to consider - HP's snapfish allows a person to print "poster" sized pictures on commercial paper, in case you have a large family photo you've always wanted enlarged or a collage of pictures produced in google's picasa3. Print your picture and build a frame to match, and then use Micheals or hobby lobby's custom framing shop to order a custom mat. this frame and picture combo was built with that process.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
A first go at the Insert

Brown Amber Wood Floor Material property

"This molding cutter will not fit my insert for the table saw," I says to me. So I says, "Let's make a new one."

Guitar accessory Musical instrument accessory Musical instrument Office equipment Electronic instrument

"Use some MDF and trace the Zero Clearance Insert you bought from Lee Craft," says I to me. "yes, and good folk they were."

Wood Rectangle Bumper Flooring Floor

"Trace the thickness needed" says I.

Tool Wood Musical instrument Musical instrument accessory Metal

Okay, enough of that weird self talk. Time for the coping saw, having ripped MDF to thickness.

Automotive parking light Automotive lighting Hood Amber Motor vehicle

Trace the parts of the old ZCI so that it will fit into the table saw. These parts will need to be drilled out. Originally, I was going to grind them out, but having taken a break for work at UPS, I came up with using my forstener bits instead. Absolutely amazing how time away from something allows the gift of insight to operate.

Wood Rectangle Automotive exterior Flooring Wood stain

Yup, needs some drilling & a bit of grinding to fit in.

Sensitive content, not recommended for those under 18
Show Content
Purple Pink Magenta Tints and shades Nail

SAFETY FIRST!

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Table

This is what an old drill press looks like!

Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Gas

An adjustable screw to hold it tight when inserted

Wood Gas Tints and shades Automotive exterior Bumper

We have a fit, though it is a bit sloppy at the end, and I drilled the finger hold on the wrong side, so I drilled a second one.

Wood Gas Tints and shades Hardwood Metal

Okay, now I was a bit sloppy using the 1 1/4" bit to drill the clearance hole, but it fit and raising the spinning blade slowly showed that it was just about spot on.

Wood Flooring Wood stain Hardwood Varnish

A profile.

Wood Hardwood Wood stain Tints and shades Plywood

A thin wall on the top section

Brown Table Wood Wood stain Floor

Disasterous results, blow out. It was all going so well and then my finger felt on ouch like being hit with a little bat, while a big bang/thwack sound happened.

Amber Wood Rectangle Orange Wood stain

blow out

Light Wood Amber Automotive exterior Wall

The insert destroyed…the cutter head is blue because I was using chalk to help drill out the hole for it.

Wood Automotive tire Floor Flooring Gas

Maybe some runners for support next time?

Okay, so I ran the pine wood through the cutter slowly, and raised it bit by bit on each pass. As the blade got higher, there was more chatter on the piece, and at one point I was it move a bit. I should have used my feather board which would have made this safer and easier. But still, why did this happen?
A. Wall on the wood too thin?
B. The knot?
C. The wiggle I saw earlier in the wood?
D. Dull cutter?
E. Bad insert?
F. Raising the blade too much at once and taking to big a bite?
G. Other thoughts?

Love to have some folks help and advice here on what happened and on how to prevent the blow out and strengthen the insert. The last picture is my next plan, unless there are other suggestions.

Thanks,
Brandon
 

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Registered
Joined
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1,251 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
A first go at the Insert

Brown Amber Wood Floor Material property

"This molding cutter will not fit my insert for the table saw," I says to me. So I says, "Let's make a new one."

Guitar accessory Musical instrument accessory Musical instrument Office equipment Electronic instrument

"Use some MDF and trace the Zero Clearance Insert you bought from Lee Craft," says I to me. "yes, and good folk they were."

Wood Rectangle Bumper Flooring Floor

"Trace the thickness needed" says I.

Tool Wood Musical instrument Musical instrument accessory Metal

Okay, enough of that weird self talk. Time for the coping saw, having ripped MDF to thickness.

Automotive parking light Automotive lighting Hood Amber Motor vehicle

Trace the parts of the old ZCI so that it will fit into the table saw. These parts will need to be drilled out. Originally, I was going to grind them out, but having taken a break for work at UPS, I came up with using my forstener bits instead. Absolutely amazing how time away from something allows the gift of insight to operate.

Wood Rectangle Automotive exterior Flooring Wood stain

Yup, needs some drilling & a bit of grinding to fit in.

Sensitive content, not recommended for those under 18
Show Content
Purple Pink Magenta Tints and shades Nail

SAFETY FIRST!

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Table

This is what an old drill press looks like!

Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Gas

An adjustable screw to hold it tight when inserted

Wood Gas Tints and shades Automotive exterior Bumper

We have a fit, though it is a bit sloppy at the end, and I drilled the finger hold on the wrong side, so I drilled a second one.

Wood Gas Tints and shades Hardwood Metal

Okay, now I was a bit sloppy using the 1 1/4" bit to drill the clearance hole, but it fit and raising the spinning blade slowly showed that it was just about spot on.

Wood Flooring Wood stain Hardwood Varnish

A profile.

Wood Hardwood Wood stain Tints and shades Plywood

A thin wall on the top section

Brown Table Wood Wood stain Floor

Disasterous results, blow out. It was all going so well and then my finger felt on ouch like being hit with a little bat, while a big bang/thwack sound happened.

Amber Wood Rectangle Orange Wood stain

blow out

Light Wood Amber Automotive exterior Wall

The insert destroyed…the cutter head is blue because I was using chalk to help drill out the hole for it.

Wood Automotive tire Floor Flooring Gas

Maybe some runners for support next time?

Okay, so I ran the pine wood through the cutter slowly, and raised it bit by bit on each pass. As the blade got higher, there was more chatter on the piece, and at one point I was it move a bit. I should have used my feather board which would have made this safer and easier. But still, why did this happen?
A. Wall on the wood too thin?
B. The knot?
C. The wiggle I saw earlier in the wood?
D. Dull cutter?
E. Bad insert?
F. Raising the blade too much at once and taking to big a bite?
G. Other thoughts?

Love to have some folks help and advice here on what happened and on how to prevent the blow out and strengthen the insert. The last picture is my next plan, unless there are other suggestions.

Thanks,
Brandon
Need help here….any thoughts?
 

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4,189 Posts
A first go at the Insert

Brown Amber Wood Floor Material property

"This molding cutter will not fit my insert for the table saw," I says to me. So I says, "Let's make a new one."

Guitar accessory Musical instrument accessory Musical instrument Office equipment Electronic instrument

"Use some MDF and trace the Zero Clearance Insert you bought from Lee Craft," says I to me. "yes, and good folk they were."

Wood Rectangle Bumper Flooring Floor

"Trace the thickness needed" says I.

Tool Wood Musical instrument Musical instrument accessory Metal

Okay, enough of that weird self talk. Time for the coping saw, having ripped MDF to thickness.

Automotive parking light Automotive lighting Hood Amber Motor vehicle

Trace the parts of the old ZCI so that it will fit into the table saw. These parts will need to be drilled out. Originally, I was going to grind them out, but having taken a break for work at UPS, I came up with using my forstener bits instead. Absolutely amazing how time away from something allows the gift of insight to operate.

Wood Rectangle Automotive exterior Flooring Wood stain

Yup, needs some drilling & a bit of grinding to fit in.

Sensitive content, not recommended for those under 18
Show Content
Purple Pink Magenta Tints and shades Nail

SAFETY FIRST!

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Table

This is what an old drill press looks like!

Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Gas

An adjustable screw to hold it tight when inserted

Wood Gas Tints and shades Automotive exterior Bumper

We have a fit, though it is a bit sloppy at the end, and I drilled the finger hold on the wrong side, so I drilled a second one.

Wood Gas Tints and shades Hardwood Metal

Okay, now I was a bit sloppy using the 1 1/4" bit to drill the clearance hole, but it fit and raising the spinning blade slowly showed that it was just about spot on.

Wood Flooring Wood stain Hardwood Varnish

A profile.

Wood Hardwood Wood stain Tints and shades Plywood

A thin wall on the top section

Brown Table Wood Wood stain Floor

Disasterous results, blow out. It was all going so well and then my finger felt on ouch like being hit with a little bat, while a big bang/thwack sound happened.

Amber Wood Rectangle Orange Wood stain

blow out

Light Wood Amber Automotive exterior Wall

The insert destroyed…the cutter head is blue because I was using chalk to help drill out the hole for it.

Wood Automotive tire Floor Flooring Gas

Maybe some runners for support next time?

Okay, so I ran the pine wood through the cutter slowly, and raised it bit by bit on each pass. As the blade got higher, there was more chatter on the piece, and at one point I was it move a bit. I should have used my feather board which would have made this safer and easier. But still, why did this happen?
A. Wall on the wood too thin?
B. The knot?
C. The wiggle I saw earlier in the wood?
D. Dull cutter?
E. Bad insert?
F. Raising the blade too much at once and taking to big a bite?
G. Other thoughts?

Love to have some folks help and advice here on what happened and on how to prevent the blow out and strengthen the insert. The last picture is my next plan, unless there are other suggestions.

Thanks,
Brandon
I've never used a molding head before. I would try feather boards to hold the molding in place. Down and to the fence. I hope this helps.
 

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287 Posts
A first go at the Insert

Brown Amber Wood Floor Material property

"This molding cutter will not fit my insert for the table saw," I says to me. So I says, "Let's make a new one."

Guitar accessory Musical instrument accessory Musical instrument Office equipment Electronic instrument

"Use some MDF and trace the Zero Clearance Insert you bought from Lee Craft," says I to me. "yes, and good folk they were."

Wood Rectangle Bumper Flooring Floor

"Trace the thickness needed" says I.

Tool Wood Musical instrument Musical instrument accessory Metal

Okay, enough of that weird self talk. Time for the coping saw, having ripped MDF to thickness.

Automotive parking light Automotive lighting Hood Amber Motor vehicle

Trace the parts of the old ZCI so that it will fit into the table saw. These parts will need to be drilled out. Originally, I was going to grind them out, but having taken a break for work at UPS, I came up with using my forstener bits instead. Absolutely amazing how time away from something allows the gift of insight to operate.

Wood Rectangle Automotive exterior Flooring Wood stain

Yup, needs some drilling & a bit of grinding to fit in.

Sensitive content, not recommended for those under 18
Show Content
Purple Pink Magenta Tints and shades Nail

SAFETY FIRST!

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Table

This is what an old drill press looks like!

Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Gas

An adjustable screw to hold it tight when inserted

Wood Gas Tints and shades Automotive exterior Bumper

We have a fit, though it is a bit sloppy at the end, and I drilled the finger hold on the wrong side, so I drilled a second one.

Wood Gas Tints and shades Hardwood Metal

Okay, now I was a bit sloppy using the 1 1/4" bit to drill the clearance hole, but it fit and raising the spinning blade slowly showed that it was just about spot on.

Wood Flooring Wood stain Hardwood Varnish

A profile.

Wood Hardwood Wood stain Tints and shades Plywood

A thin wall on the top section

Brown Table Wood Wood stain Floor

Disasterous results, blow out. It was all going so well and then my finger felt on ouch like being hit with a little bat, while a big bang/thwack sound happened.

Amber Wood Rectangle Orange Wood stain

blow out

Light Wood Amber Automotive exterior Wall

The insert destroyed…the cutter head is blue because I was using chalk to help drill out the hole for it.

Wood Automotive tire Floor Flooring Gas

Maybe some runners for support next time?

Okay, so I ran the pine wood through the cutter slowly, and raised it bit by bit on each pass. As the blade got higher, there was more chatter on the piece, and at one point I was it move a bit. I should have used my feather board which would have made this safer and easier. But still, why did this happen?
A. Wall on the wood too thin?
B. The knot?
C. The wiggle I saw earlier in the wood?
D. Dull cutter?
E. Bad insert?
F. Raising the blade too much at once and taking to big a bite?
G. Other thoughts?

Love to have some folks help and advice here on what happened and on how to prevent the blow out and strengthen the insert. The last picture is my next plan, unless there are other suggestions.

Thanks,
Brandon
I'm thinking it happened because the knot might have been a little loose, has you can see the blow out happened with the grain and in the only spot with a knot.
 

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626 Posts
A first go at the Insert

Brown Amber Wood Floor Material property

"This molding cutter will not fit my insert for the table saw," I says to me. So I says, "Let's make a new one."

Guitar accessory Musical instrument accessory Musical instrument Office equipment Electronic instrument

"Use some MDF and trace the Zero Clearance Insert you bought from Lee Craft," says I to me. "yes, and good folk they were."

Wood Rectangle Bumper Flooring Floor

"Trace the thickness needed" says I.

Tool Wood Musical instrument Musical instrument accessory Metal

Okay, enough of that weird self talk. Time for the coping saw, having ripped MDF to thickness.

Automotive parking light Automotive lighting Hood Amber Motor vehicle

Trace the parts of the old ZCI so that it will fit into the table saw. These parts will need to be drilled out. Originally, I was going to grind them out, but having taken a break for work at UPS, I came up with using my forstener bits instead. Absolutely amazing how time away from something allows the gift of insight to operate.

Wood Rectangle Automotive exterior Flooring Wood stain

Yup, needs some drilling & a bit of grinding to fit in.

Sensitive content, not recommended for those under 18
Show Content
Purple Pink Magenta Tints and shades Nail

SAFETY FIRST!

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Table

This is what an old drill press looks like!

Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Gas

An adjustable screw to hold it tight when inserted

Wood Gas Tints and shades Automotive exterior Bumper

We have a fit, though it is a bit sloppy at the end, and I drilled the finger hold on the wrong side, so I drilled a second one.

Wood Gas Tints and shades Hardwood Metal

Okay, now I was a bit sloppy using the 1 1/4" bit to drill the clearance hole, but it fit and raising the spinning blade slowly showed that it was just about spot on.

Wood Flooring Wood stain Hardwood Varnish

A profile.

Wood Hardwood Wood stain Tints and shades Plywood

A thin wall on the top section

Brown Table Wood Wood stain Floor

Disasterous results, blow out. It was all going so well and then my finger felt on ouch like being hit with a little bat, while a big bang/thwack sound happened.

Amber Wood Rectangle Orange Wood stain

blow out

Light Wood Amber Automotive exterior Wall

The insert destroyed…the cutter head is blue because I was using chalk to help drill out the hole for it.

Wood Automotive tire Floor Flooring Gas

Maybe some runners for support next time?

Okay, so I ran the pine wood through the cutter slowly, and raised it bit by bit on each pass. As the blade got higher, there was more chatter on the piece, and at one point I was it move a bit. I should have used my feather board which would have made this safer and easier. But still, why did this happen?
A. Wall on the wood too thin?
B. The knot?
C. The wiggle I saw earlier in the wood?
D. Dull cutter?
E. Bad insert?
F. Raising the blade too much at once and taking to big a bite?
G. Other thoughts?

Love to have some folks help and advice here on what happened and on how to prevent the blow out and strengthen the insert. The last picture is my next plan, unless there are other suggestions.

Thanks,
Brandon
I have to agree that the knot played a major roll in this event. Additionally, I think that your choice of material for the throat plate contributed to the problem. While MDF is flat and stable it has no structural strength. I would make the next throat plate out of Baltic Birch plywood. And of course use clear stock.

Good luck.
 

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1,836 Posts
A first go at the Insert

Brown Amber Wood Floor Material property

"This molding cutter will not fit my insert for the table saw," I says to me. So I says, "Let's make a new one."

Guitar accessory Musical instrument accessory Musical instrument Office equipment Electronic instrument

"Use some MDF and trace the Zero Clearance Insert you bought from Lee Craft," says I to me. "yes, and good folk they were."

Wood Rectangle Bumper Flooring Floor

"Trace the thickness needed" says I.

Tool Wood Musical instrument Musical instrument accessory Metal

Okay, enough of that weird self talk. Time for the coping saw, having ripped MDF to thickness.

Automotive parking light Automotive lighting Hood Amber Motor vehicle

Trace the parts of the old ZCI so that it will fit into the table saw. These parts will need to be drilled out. Originally, I was going to grind them out, but having taken a break for work at UPS, I came up with using my forstener bits instead. Absolutely amazing how time away from something allows the gift of insight to operate.

Wood Rectangle Automotive exterior Flooring Wood stain

Yup, needs some drilling & a bit of grinding to fit in.

Sensitive content, not recommended for those under 18
Show Content
Purple Pink Magenta Tints and shades Nail

SAFETY FIRST!

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Table

This is what an old drill press looks like!

Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Gas

An adjustable screw to hold it tight when inserted

Wood Gas Tints and shades Automotive exterior Bumper

We have a fit, though it is a bit sloppy at the end, and I drilled the finger hold on the wrong side, so I drilled a second one.

Wood Gas Tints and shades Hardwood Metal

Okay, now I was a bit sloppy using the 1 1/4" bit to drill the clearance hole, but it fit and raising the spinning blade slowly showed that it was just about spot on.

Wood Flooring Wood stain Hardwood Varnish

A profile.

Wood Hardwood Wood stain Tints and shades Plywood

A thin wall on the top section

Brown Table Wood Wood stain Floor

Disasterous results, blow out. It was all going so well and then my finger felt on ouch like being hit with a little bat, while a big bang/thwack sound happened.

Amber Wood Rectangle Orange Wood stain

blow out

Light Wood Amber Automotive exterior Wall

The insert destroyed…the cutter head is blue because I was using chalk to help drill out the hole for it.

Wood Automotive tire Floor Flooring Gas

Maybe some runners for support next time?

Okay, so I ran the pine wood through the cutter slowly, and raised it bit by bit on each pass. As the blade got higher, there was more chatter on the piece, and at one point I was it move a bit. I should have used my feather board which would have made this safer and easier. But still, why did this happen?
A. Wall on the wood too thin?
B. The knot?
C. The wiggle I saw earlier in the wood?
D. Dull cutter?
E. Bad insert?
F. Raising the blade too much at once and taking to big a bite?
G. Other thoughts?

Love to have some folks help and advice here on what happened and on how to prevent the blow out and strengthen the insert. The last picture is my next plan, unless there are other suggestions.

Thanks,
Brandon
I vote for all the above…

Be Careful!

Herb
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
A first go at the Insert

Brown Amber Wood Floor Material property

"This molding cutter will not fit my insert for the table saw," I says to me. So I says, "Let's make a new one."

Guitar accessory Musical instrument accessory Musical instrument Office equipment Electronic instrument

"Use some MDF and trace the Zero Clearance Insert you bought from Lee Craft," says I to me. "yes, and good folk they were."

Wood Rectangle Bumper Flooring Floor

"Trace the thickness needed" says I.

Tool Wood Musical instrument Musical instrument accessory Metal

Okay, enough of that weird self talk. Time for the coping saw, having ripped MDF to thickness.

Automotive parking light Automotive lighting Hood Amber Motor vehicle

Trace the parts of the old ZCI so that it will fit into the table saw. These parts will need to be drilled out. Originally, I was going to grind them out, but having taken a break for work at UPS, I came up with using my forstener bits instead. Absolutely amazing how time away from something allows the gift of insight to operate.

Wood Rectangle Automotive exterior Flooring Wood stain

Yup, needs some drilling & a bit of grinding to fit in.

Sensitive content, not recommended for those under 18
Show Content
Purple Pink Magenta Tints and shades Nail

SAFETY FIRST!

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Table

This is what an old drill press looks like!

Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Gas

An adjustable screw to hold it tight when inserted

Wood Gas Tints and shades Automotive exterior Bumper

We have a fit, though it is a bit sloppy at the end, and I drilled the finger hold on the wrong side, so I drilled a second one.

Wood Gas Tints and shades Hardwood Metal

Okay, now I was a bit sloppy using the 1 1/4" bit to drill the clearance hole, but it fit and raising the spinning blade slowly showed that it was just about spot on.

Wood Flooring Wood stain Hardwood Varnish

A profile.

Wood Hardwood Wood stain Tints and shades Plywood

A thin wall on the top section

Brown Table Wood Wood stain Floor

Disasterous results, blow out. It was all going so well and then my finger felt on ouch like being hit with a little bat, while a big bang/thwack sound happened.

Amber Wood Rectangle Orange Wood stain

blow out

Light Wood Amber Automotive exterior Wall

The insert destroyed…the cutter head is blue because I was using chalk to help drill out the hole for it.

Wood Automotive tire Floor Flooring Gas

Maybe some runners for support next time?

Okay, so I ran the pine wood through the cutter slowly, and raised it bit by bit on each pass. As the blade got higher, there was more chatter on the piece, and at one point I was it move a bit. I should have used my feather board which would have made this safer and easier. But still, why did this happen?
A. Wall on the wood too thin?
B. The knot?
C. The wiggle I saw earlier in the wood?
D. Dull cutter?
E. Bad insert?
F. Raising the blade too much at once and taking to big a bite?
G. Other thoughts?

Love to have some folks help and advice here on what happened and on how to prevent the blow out and strengthen the insert. The last picture is my next plan, unless there are other suggestions.

Thanks,
Brandon
Thanks Herb. How did you cut the cove in the frame you posted?
 

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1,157 Posts
A first go at the Insert

Brown Amber Wood Floor Material property

"This molding cutter will not fit my insert for the table saw," I says to me. So I says, "Let's make a new one."

Guitar accessory Musical instrument accessory Musical instrument Office equipment Electronic instrument

"Use some MDF and trace the Zero Clearance Insert you bought from Lee Craft," says I to me. "yes, and good folk they were."

Wood Rectangle Bumper Flooring Floor

"Trace the thickness needed" says I.

Tool Wood Musical instrument Musical instrument accessory Metal

Okay, enough of that weird self talk. Time for the coping saw, having ripped MDF to thickness.

Automotive parking light Automotive lighting Hood Amber Motor vehicle

Trace the parts of the old ZCI so that it will fit into the table saw. These parts will need to be drilled out. Originally, I was going to grind them out, but having taken a break for work at UPS, I came up with using my forstener bits instead. Absolutely amazing how time away from something allows the gift of insight to operate.

Wood Rectangle Automotive exterior Flooring Wood stain

Yup, needs some drilling & a bit of grinding to fit in.

Sensitive content, not recommended for those under 18
Show Content
Purple Pink Magenta Tints and shades Nail

SAFETY FIRST!

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Table

This is what an old drill press looks like!

Brown Amber Wood Rectangle Gas

An adjustable screw to hold it tight when inserted

Wood Gas Tints and shades Automotive exterior Bumper

We have a fit, though it is a bit sloppy at the end, and I drilled the finger hold on the wrong side, so I drilled a second one.

Wood Gas Tints and shades Hardwood Metal

Okay, now I was a bit sloppy using the 1 1/4" bit to drill the clearance hole, but it fit and raising the spinning blade slowly showed that it was just about spot on.

Wood Flooring Wood stain Hardwood Varnish

A profile.

Wood Hardwood Wood stain Tints and shades Plywood

A thin wall on the top section

Brown Table Wood Wood stain Floor

Disasterous results, blow out. It was all going so well and then my finger felt on ouch like being hit with a little bat, while a big bang/thwack sound happened.

Amber Wood Rectangle Orange Wood stain

blow out

Light Wood Amber Automotive exterior Wall

The insert destroyed…the cutter head is blue because I was using chalk to help drill out the hole for it.

Wood Automotive tire Floor Flooring Gas

Maybe some runners for support next time?

Okay, so I ran the pine wood through the cutter slowly, and raised it bit by bit on each pass. As the blade got higher, there was more chatter on the piece, and at one point I was it move a bit. I should have used my feather board which would have made this safer and easier. But still, why did this happen?
A. Wall on the wood too thin?
B. The knot?
C. The wiggle I saw earlier in the wood?
D. Dull cutter?
E. Bad insert?
F. Raising the blade too much at once and taking to big a bite?
G. Other thoughts?

Love to have some folks help and advice here on what happened and on how to prevent the blow out and strengthen the insert. The last picture is my next plan, unless there are other suggestions.

Thanks,
Brandon
I only ever used the molding head in my table saw once. I don't mind telling you the damned thing scared me so I took extra precautions.

I didn't use a zero-clearance insert - the previous owner of my saw had made an aluminum insert with almost 1/8" clearance on the sides and a slot long enough to accomodate the entire molding head. But he had set it up so that it just laid in the cutout for the insert. I didn't like that and spent some time making two spring clips that held the insert securely - one at each end. I made two featherboards - one held the piece down against the table securely and the second held it against the fence. I reasoned that kickback shouldn't be a problem since the featherboards wouldn't allow it - any force trying to push the workpiece backwards tightens them up. Try it; you cannot pull work backwards through a featherboard.

I used this setup to mill about 60-70 feet of 3/4" square oak to edge plywood. I didn't take nearly the amount of material off that you did - only about 1/4" deep at the deepest part of the profile - so I did it all in one pass. I set it all up, ran about 6-7 10 feet pieces of oak through and didn't have one problem. Knots and splits didn't cause any problems. Running all the pieces through took about 1/10 the time it took to set everything up. With me pushing and my son pulling neither one of us got our hands within 3 feet of the whirling flesh-eating parts.

Take your time and jig everything up to be as accident-proof as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Zero Clearance Take 2: Using a Molding Head on the Table Saw, Safety and Other Thoughts

In the last blog entry, the table saw molding cutter fiasco was discussed. After some feedback, and encouragement, and trust that the mishap was partly due to a knot in the wood (WHO PUT THAT THERE!), I went back and reworked the Insert. This time I made it slower, neater, and let the cutter itself remove the kerf by very, VERY slowly raising it while the fence held it down. If you do this, please use a cutter that has both outside edges; otherwise, you may not have created a universal slot for your molder head.

Wood Gas Tints and shades Composite material Rectangle


I also made a second featherboard to hold the wood down from above. I ended up not using this because it got in the way of cleanly handling the wood.

Wood Automotive design Floor Flooring Rectangle


Finally, I still experienced a similar slap on one test piece, without destroying the insert this time. I realized that this is not like a saw blade that partly holds the piece in place with its side…when you rip a piece of wood, the fence and blade align that piece. When you use the molder, the wood is much more free to wiggle about. This caused dangerous kick back, tear out, or who knows what.

Solution:
I moved my Rockler featherboard directly beside the cutter. In normal ripping operations, a featherboard is about a 1/4" prior to the blade. But here, I used the featherboard in a manner that is proably akin to a shapers feeders.

Changes I made this time:
1. better insert (albeit still MDF and too flexible…dangerous).
2. Use Featherboard
3.Place featherboard directly in line with cutters (not over them however:))
4. Use thicker, wider, longer wood, and plan to rip to size after.
5.Use a slightly faster feed rate.
6.Use push stick to move, and hand as (secondary) guide against fence. Primary guide is featherboard.

I have to say, this molder head is a pretty intimidating tablesaw tool. It does wonders, but it makes my heart pound.

Originally, I imagined that I might one day use the cutter to round over edges, but I believe that even with long stock, it would not be possible, or at least very dangerous. What do yall think? As you can see on the two profiles, there is overhang on both sides. I can see doing it without overhang on one side, but not running it through the cutter knives at the exact width of the knife. For the last part of the cut, the wood would be floating in the air, having cut off its edge, no?

Wood Creative arts Wood stain Art Hardwood


Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood
 

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Zero Clearance Take 2: Using a Molding Head on the Table Saw, Safety and Other Thoughts

In the last blog entry, the table saw molding cutter fiasco was discussed. After some feedback, and encouragement, and trust that the mishap was partly due to a knot in the wood (WHO PUT THAT THERE!), I went back and reworked the Insert. This time I made it slower, neater, and let the cutter itself remove the kerf by very, VERY slowly raising it while the fence held it down. If you do this, please use a cutter that has both outside edges; otherwise, you may not have created a universal slot for your molder head.

Wood Gas Tints and shades Composite material Rectangle


I also made a second featherboard to hold the wood down from above. I ended up not using this because it got in the way of cleanly handling the wood.

Wood Automotive design Floor Flooring Rectangle


Finally, I still experienced a similar slap on one test piece, without destroying the insert this time. I realized that this is not like a saw blade that partly holds the piece in place with its side…when you rip a piece of wood, the fence and blade align that piece. When you use the molder, the wood is much more free to wiggle about. This caused dangerous kick back, tear out, or who knows what.

Solution:
I moved my Rockler featherboard directly beside the cutter. In normal ripping operations, a featherboard is about a 1/4" prior to the blade. But here, I used the featherboard in a manner that is proably akin to a shapers feeders.

Changes I made this time:
1. better insert (albeit still MDF and too flexible…dangerous).
2. Use Featherboard
3.Place featherboard directly in line with cutters (not over them however:))
4. Use thicker, wider, longer wood, and plan to rip to size after.
5.Use a slightly faster feed rate.
6.Use push stick to move, and hand as (secondary) guide against fence. Primary guide is featherboard.

I have to say, this molder head is a pretty intimidating tablesaw tool. It does wonders, but it makes my heart pound.

Originally, I imagined that I might one day use the cutter to round over edges, but I believe that even with long stock, it would not be possible, or at least very dangerous. What do yall think? As you can see on the two profiles, there is overhang on both sides. I can see doing it without overhang on one side, but not running it through the cutter knives at the exact width of the knife. For the last part of the cut, the wood would be floating in the air, having cut off its edge, no?

Wood Creative arts Wood stain Art Hardwood


Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood
You learned something. You came out in one piece and the profile looks great. I'm looking forward to seeing the finished frame.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Profiles

I have finally finished cutting the frame profiles. I decided to make a bunch of small frames, rather than just one. I really like framing, but boy am I dreading the mitering and glue up!

But before getting into the mitering (next blog entry), I wanted to show off some of the profiles. The first two pictures are of the frame I took from the plans on the American Woodworker website. I really enjoyed doing that one.

Wood Flooring Gesture Floor Wood stain


Wood Flooring Rectangle Wood stain Floor


Wood Flooring Floor Gesture Road surface


Brown Window Wood Rectangle Beige


Wood Rectangle Gesture Finger Wood stain


Light Wood Gesture Flooring Floor


Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Wall


I already tried once on a cove frame I cut, and I just can't get those miters to fit right. So if you have any suggestions, I will take your advise ingto account. I have hear of using a burnisher to force the miters to close, sanding, or more accurate table sawing. What do you think? Sorry about the picture quality.
Wood Wood stain Floor Flooring Hardwood


Wood Hardwood Rectangle Plywood Metal


Well, before I cut any miters, I think I will do some preperatory sanding. l

By the way, I discuss using the craftsman molder head in the previous blogs, but there is also a good discussion here by bkhop pertaining to the shopsmith. It is relevant to molding work in general and to these kinds of cutter heads:
http://lumberjocks.com/hops/blog/5688
 

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Profiles

I have finally finished cutting the frame profiles. I decided to make a bunch of small frames, rather than just one. I really like framing, but boy am I dreading the mitering and glue up!

But before getting into the mitering (next blog entry), I wanted to show off some of the profiles. The first two pictures are of the frame I took from the plans on the American Woodworker website. I really enjoyed doing that one.

Wood Flooring Gesture Floor Wood stain


Wood Flooring Rectangle Wood stain Floor


Wood Flooring Floor Gesture Road surface


Brown Window Wood Rectangle Beige


Wood Rectangle Gesture Finger Wood stain


Light Wood Gesture Flooring Floor


Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Wall


I already tried once on a cove frame I cut, and I just can't get those miters to fit right. So if you have any suggestions, I will take your advise ingto account. I have hear of using a burnisher to force the miters to close, sanding, or more accurate table sawing. What do you think? Sorry about the picture quality.
Wood Wood stain Floor Flooring Hardwood


Wood Hardwood Rectangle Plywood Metal


Well, before I cut any miters, I think I will do some preperatory sanding. l

By the way, I discuss using the craftsman molder head in the previous blogs, but there is also a good discussion here by bkhop pertaining to the shopsmith. It is relevant to molding work in general and to these kinds of cutter heads:
http://lumberjocks.com/hops/blog/5688
The profiles look good. there are many frame jig plans for the table saw. Shooting board is another option.
 

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Profiles

I have finally finished cutting the frame profiles. I decided to make a bunch of small frames, rather than just one. I really like framing, but boy am I dreading the mitering and glue up!

But before getting into the mitering (next blog entry), I wanted to show off some of the profiles. The first two pictures are of the frame I took from the plans on the American Woodworker website. I really enjoyed doing that one.

Wood Flooring Gesture Floor Wood stain


Wood Flooring Rectangle Wood stain Floor


Wood Flooring Floor Gesture Road surface


Brown Window Wood Rectangle Beige


Wood Rectangle Gesture Finger Wood stain


Light Wood Gesture Flooring Floor


Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Wall


I already tried once on a cove frame I cut, and I just can't get those miters to fit right. So if you have any suggestions, I will take your advise ingto account. I have hear of using a burnisher to force the miters to close, sanding, or more accurate table sawing. What do you think? Sorry about the picture quality.
Wood Wood stain Floor Flooring Hardwood


Wood Hardwood Rectangle Plywood Metal


Well, before I cut any miters, I think I will do some preperatory sanding. l

By the way, I discuss using the craftsman molder head in the previous blogs, but there is also a good discussion here by bkhop pertaining to the shopsmith. It is relevant to molding work in general and to these kinds of cutter heads:
http://lumberjocks.com/hops/blog/5688
I have a hard time with that, too. I have trouble getting that accurate with a table saw. I'd suggest a compound miter saw. Some of them aren't to expensive.
Those are great looking profiles. Did you cut them yourself? I just saw the other blog. Very interesting. What size stock do you recommend for doing that?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Profiles

I have finally finished cutting the frame profiles. I decided to make a bunch of small frames, rather than just one. I really like framing, but boy am I dreading the mitering and glue up!

But before getting into the mitering (next blog entry), I wanted to show off some of the profiles. The first two pictures are of the frame I took from the plans on the American Woodworker website. I really enjoyed doing that one.

Wood Flooring Gesture Floor Wood stain


Wood Flooring Rectangle Wood stain Floor


Wood Flooring Floor Gesture Road surface


Brown Window Wood Rectangle Beige


Wood Rectangle Gesture Finger Wood stain


Light Wood Gesture Flooring Floor


Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Wall


I already tried once on a cove frame I cut, and I just can't get those miters to fit right. So if you have any suggestions, I will take your advise ingto account. I have hear of using a burnisher to force the miters to close, sanding, or more accurate table sawing. What do you think? Sorry about the picture quality.
Wood Wood stain Floor Flooring Hardwood


Wood Hardwood Rectangle Plywood Metal


Well, before I cut any miters, I think I will do some preperatory sanding. l

By the way, I discuss using the craftsman molder head in the previous blogs, but there is also a good discussion here by bkhop pertaining to the shopsmith. It is relevant to molding work in general and to these kinds of cutter heads:
http://lumberjocks.com/hops/blog/5688
Thanks Wudchuck. You can see how I did it on the earlier posts. But the size i up you. The table saw molder cutters are 1" wide, so I ued stock that was wider and thicker, which added safety and stability. Then I ripped them to size, most are about 1 to 1.5 inches. Some of the profiles were made with jut angling the saw.
 

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Profiles

I have finally finished cutting the frame profiles. I decided to make a bunch of small frames, rather than just one. I really like framing, but boy am I dreading the mitering and glue up!

But before getting into the mitering (next blog entry), I wanted to show off some of the profiles. The first two pictures are of the frame I took from the plans on the American Woodworker website. I really enjoyed doing that one.

Wood Flooring Gesture Floor Wood stain


Wood Flooring Rectangle Wood stain Floor


Wood Flooring Floor Gesture Road surface


Brown Window Wood Rectangle Beige


Wood Rectangle Gesture Finger Wood stain


Light Wood Gesture Flooring Floor


Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Wall


I already tried once on a cove frame I cut, and I just can't get those miters to fit right. So if you have any suggestions, I will take your advise ingto account. I have hear of using a burnisher to force the miters to close, sanding, or more accurate table sawing. What do you think? Sorry about the picture quality.
Wood Wood stain Floor Flooring Hardwood


Wood Hardwood Rectangle Plywood Metal


Well, before I cut any miters, I think I will do some preperatory sanding. l

By the way, I discuss using the craftsman molder head in the previous blogs, but there is also a good discussion here by bkhop pertaining to the shopsmith. It is relevant to molding work in general and to these kinds of cutter heads:
http://lumberjocks.com/hops/blog/5688
For the miters…Dedicated miter sled for the TS or a really nice and accurate Incra (or similar) miter gauge. Also, for the narrow profiles you're doing, a disk sander with fence at 45 would work too.

Incidentally, many would say the compound miter saw would not come close to the accuracy of the things I mentioned above.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Camera Broken

Well, Grandma's picture frame is pretty much all done. It is a small wallnut frame with some molding…not the kind you get from old milk.

I am really happy with them. So happy that I have decided to try selling them locally. I am going to put an ad in the local paper and on craigslist.

It is the kind of work that I really enjoy. A relatively straightfoward job with enough variation to keep me interested. I'm sure I will put up some photographs when the camera is fixed, and blog as the framing business comes together.

I have ordered some tools for it, but nothing exessive. The biggest purchase was a Wilton vise. Otherwise, I am just getting the shop ready. I built the lumberstorage triangle from shop notes 55. I am putting up somemore shelving. I rearanged the shop and am building an assembly table and a tool cabinet. Maybe I will post on the shop in a few weeks.

It gave me a chance to look over my purchases over the last year (my first year of woodworking & lumberjocks). Wow! Just amazing stuff. I feel so much more confident as a woodworker, and to some degree as a human being. and Wow! I need to be accountable when it comes to spending money. This small business will be a great chance to keep on top of myself.

Grandma's birthday is in a week, and I am looking foward to flying home to NY.

Thanks for reading, and if you have any advice about framing, I'd be glad to hear it.
 

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Camera Broken

Well, Grandma's picture frame is pretty much all done. It is a small wallnut frame with some molding…not the kind you get from old milk.

I am really happy with them. So happy that I have decided to try selling them locally. I am going to put an ad in the local paper and on craigslist.

It is the kind of work that I really enjoy. A relatively straightfoward job with enough variation to keep me interested. I'm sure I will put up some photographs when the camera is fixed, and blog as the framing business comes together.

I have ordered some tools for it, but nothing exessive. The biggest purchase was a Wilton vise. Otherwise, I am just getting the shop ready. I built the lumberstorage triangle from shop notes 55. I am putting up somemore shelving. I rearanged the shop and am building an assembly table and a tool cabinet. Maybe I will post on the shop in a few weeks.

It gave me a chance to look over my purchases over the last year (my first year of woodworking & lumberjocks). Wow! Just amazing stuff. I feel so much more confident as a woodworker, and to some degree as a human being. and Wow! I need to be accountable when it comes to spending money. This small business will be a great chance to keep on top of myself.

Grandma's birthday is in a week, and I am looking foward to flying home to NY.

Thanks for reading, and if you have any advice about framing, I'd be glad to hear it.
without pictures
it could be milk mold

care to buy a bridge
send me the money
i'll send you a picture of it
 

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Camera Broken

Well, Grandma's picture frame is pretty much all done. It is a small wallnut frame with some molding…not the kind you get from old milk.

I am really happy with them. So happy that I have decided to try selling them locally. I am going to put an ad in the local paper and on craigslist.

It is the kind of work that I really enjoy. A relatively straightfoward job with enough variation to keep me interested. I'm sure I will put up some photographs when the camera is fixed, and blog as the framing business comes together.

I have ordered some tools for it, but nothing exessive. The biggest purchase was a Wilton vise. Otherwise, I am just getting the shop ready. I built the lumberstorage triangle from shop notes 55. I am putting up somemore shelving. I rearanged the shop and am building an assembly table and a tool cabinet. Maybe I will post on the shop in a few weeks.

It gave me a chance to look over my purchases over the last year (my first year of woodworking & lumberjocks). Wow! Just amazing stuff. I feel so much more confident as a woodworker, and to some degree as a human being. and Wow! I need to be accountable when it comes to spending money. This small business will be a great chance to keep on top of myself.

Grandma's birthday is in a week, and I am looking foward to flying home to NY.

Thanks for reading, and if you have any advice about framing, I'd be glad to hear it.
When I saw the title I thought the frame broke teh camera ;-))
 
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