LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I hope this is the proper forum. First post. I've got a ten ear old grizzly 5hp right tilt cabinet saw. The pre riving knife variety. I'm using this blade to rip purple heart: Freud LM72M010 Industrial Heavy Duty Rip Saw Blade 10-Inch by 24t Flat Top 5/8-Inch arbor Ice Coated

Before making any cuts, I used the woodpeckers saw guage to get everything squared to within less than two thousanths. I attached a pic of the cut, and I'm not sure why I'm having this issue with the blade marks on the piece. Am I feeding to slowly?

Sorry for the novice question.
Wood Wall Wood stain Hardwood Tints and shades
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,872 Posts
Have you checked the blade for runout?

Stabilizers will probably help. I've used stabilizer discs
with rip blades to rip glue joints with acceptable
results. I got mine at Sears. Forrest sells some
big ones they claim make a big difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,239 Posts
That looks like you need to get some featherboards and hold the piece tight to the fence as you push it through the blade. AND… your fence needs to be stable as a rock. If you can push against the fence at a point about even with the blade and that pushing gives you some deflection of the fence, then any variation in the pressure you use to hold the piece against the fence will cause saw marks.

Think of it like this:
You're carefully holding a piece against the fence. As the piece moves into the blade you find that you need to reposition your hand so it doesn't get too close to the blade. By moving your hand, you change the pressure being applied against the fence and the wood "relaxes" toward the blade.

Using featherboards, besides being safer, puts a steady pressure on the wood against the fence. Because the featherboard doesn't move and doesn't have to be repositioned as the wood is fed into the blade.

So…... make sure your fence locks TIGHT and doesn't deflect with sideways pressure.
If it's a t-square type fence, the tail end will almost SURELY deflect.
Make some featherboards. They make a HUGE difference and it takes some of the "human variable" out of this so you can see if you actually have an adjustment issue on your saw. :)

your saw might be fine.
Your technique may need the adjustment :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That looks like you need to get some featherboards and hold the piece tight to the fence as you push it through the blade. AND… your fence needs to be stable as a rock. If you can push against the fence at a point about even with the blade and that pushing gives you some deflection of the fence, then any variation in the pressure you use to hold the piece against the fence will cause saw marks.

Think of it like this:
You re carefully holding a piece against the fence. As the piece moves into the blade you find that you need to reposition your hand so it doesn t get too close to the blade. By moving your hand, you change the pressure being applied against the fence and the wood "relaxes" toward the blade.

Using featherboards, besides being safer, puts a steady pressure on the wood against the fence. Because the featherboard doesn t move and doesn t have to be repositioned as the wood is fed into the blade.

So…... make sure your fence locks TIGHT and doesn t deflect with sideways pressure.
If it s a t-square type fence, the tail end will almost SURELY deflect.
Make some featherboards. They make a HUGE difference and it takes some of the "human variable" out of this so you can see if you actually have an adjustment issue on your saw. :)

your saw might be fine.
Your technique may need the adjustment :)

- Charlie
Thank you! I did end up using a featherboard and got better results. Also, my fence is a https://www.grizzly.com/products/The-Shop-Fox-Classic-Fence-System-w-Standard-Rails/W2005 and it absolutely deflects at the tail end of the fence.

I'd definitely rather tweak my technique than find out I have a wobbly arbor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,239 Posts
Well if you have excessive runout, your technique is only going to improve your results by just so much. :) You'd STILL have to fix the runout.

But s certain amount of runout is …. let's say…. within tolerance. Just as a certain amount of fence deflection is within tolerance. Too much of either would be bad, but….. and I'm actually talking about ME here…. I was a journeyman millright, and people ALWAYS wanted to blame the machine if something wasn't coming out the way they wanted. I could always fix the machine, but I couldn't "adjust" the human running it (though sometimes I'd have liked to)

In my own shop and my own experience, I often step back when there's an issue and really ask myself, "Is it the machine or is it me?" And, to be honest, a lot of the time it's me. :)

There.
I've admitted it.

I have some rips coming up in some hard maple. My previous experience says that I'll get the best results if I have a sharp (and CLEAN) blade, a solid setup, and then, since I don't have an auto-feeder, a consistent feed speed. My push stick is on my fence. As the end of the board crosses my front fence rail, I am feeding with my left, grabbing the push stick with my right, and then switching to feeding with the push stick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,104 Posts
A blade with a few more teeth will also give a little better cuts. With a 24 Tooth blade, your margin for error is very, very small.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,611 Posts
I found that the Freud Fusion blade actually leaves a cleaner cut than their rip blade, by not by much.

The feather board is a good suggestion.

Also, try to feed your stock at a steady, but constant, rate. Any stops in the feed process can cause the blade marks you are seeing.

A zero clearance insert plate and a MJ micro splitter would also help. I still use them for safety and it does help keep the stock tight to the fence, once past the blade.

Welcome to LumberJocks and kudos for using good tools to set up your saw. Takes the guess work out of set up and allows one to cut with confidence.

Well done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
244 Posts
I tried to glue up without using the jointer to edge boards, had to run some of the boards to get a gapless panel. However, since I got a Hammer sliding tablesaw, found I can get gapless rips almost every time. The slider is amazing. Only can get cuts as long as the slider however.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top