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Re-purposing a shop bench to a woodworkers bench

Been awhile since my last post:

Randy aka Blackie asked that I show my rehabbed/recycled Hybrid woodworking bench. Please feel free to share your thoughts, advise and humor. It is appreciated.

So here it is! Looked and listened to some really good woodworkers here on LJ's like Paul aka Shipwright, and Kiefer. Have to give credit to Paul Sellers and his YouTube video of constructing a woodworkers bench and a more recent one regarding adding bench dogs to your existing bench. Also an excellent video on installing a Jorgenson Woodworking bench vise.

I thought about building one like my hero's, but I am being true to my Wabi Sabi self in recycling and re-purposing what I have, while learning from my imperfections….LOL!

Another step in becoming a better woodworker.

The first Picture is the bench vise I purchased last year after reading positive and negative reviews on Amazon. I have since learned more about different types and might now choose a different vise. But this one will have to be my workhorse.

Fluid Cosmetics Air gun Trigger Liquid


I built this bench from the materials that I used building a three section bench attached to the shop wall out of the construction material that was to be a shop floor. ( Before I found water leaking in under the walls of my shop…another long story…grrr) I had set it up to do metal work. Had a big machinist vise and an angle iron edge. Had built it to balance sheet goods when using my old craftsman belt driven table saw. Now have a Grizzly cabinet saw and height is different. It had been a modified tension box and deck type frame construction. So the 2×8's were glued and screwed to the bottom of the bench top for future bench dog holes. Otherwise the whole bench is anchored together with ceramic coated screws.

Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood


This was another inspired innovation. LOL! I rehabbed an office chair and used star nuts for the levelers. I saw Shipwright's solution and looked at what the costs of bench wheels were at the woodstores. I purchased the castors with the stems, originally for my scroll saw stand. At least 150 pounds and locking hubs for wheels and pivot bearings. Had to run the threading all the way through the castor with WD Forty and a wrench. Mounted the star nuts with s sledge hammer. Drilled holes into the legs and screwed on the castors. Seemed like a great solution.

Until I turned the bench over! The star nuts really could not provide a stable anchor and the bench would rock with the brakes on! A couple taps with my hammer and they were dislodged! Back to the idea board? Oh yeah they made the bench too high.

I had to use a 2×4 laid on its face to provide the difference for me to have the right bench height. As I said back to the idea board. But it is working and I have used it for a couple projects so far.

Wood Workbench Tool Machine Hardwood


Not as expected!

Table Furniture Tradesman Wood Artisan


Next picture is mounting my "POS" 7 inch Harbor Freight bench vise, bought many years ago. Very sloppy , but I am using it to anchor pieces for planning against bench dogs until I can afford to purchase another one.

Tradesman Carpenter Wood Floor Flooring


Had some ceder fence boards that were sitting in the basement that were long enough to add a nice finish to the construction materials…LOL! They were also the same depth at the Jorgenson vise jaws. Hey I even hand planned the rough sides down to make finished boards. Got that brain storm while sanding and getting coated with saw dust!

Table Wood Creative arts Hardwood Workbench


Well as I posted earlier in my shop notes blog this was a good idea that failed. I find my shop has gotten smaller with the assembly of all the shop equipment. The mobile bench was a way to set up tools in a work plan. When I have more woodworking time I will revisit the mobility issue. Until then it is now more functional, comfortable, and I found some ash to fit the vise jaws!

Wood Workbench Sewing machine Gas Table


As I've complained to my friends, I have to get some major maintenance done on my old Victorian, while I am able to climb ladders, hang out windows, and lift commodes to repair broken flanges in upstairs toilets! also to use the window of weather while I can?

Thanks for viewing!
Well Tom that looks nice strong and sturdy, I've heard no matter what you build you want it strong enough to have sex on it :)
 

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Adding dust collection to my jointer and my planer

Been awhile and making some progress!

Thought I'd do an update on my depreciated shop equipment LOL! Murphy continues to haunt my shop but it appears he went South for a winter vacation!

I want to thank Stumpy Nubbs for inspiration while shopping at his and my favorite box store. Stumpy finds innovative adaptive uses for items we might not associate with woodworking. I've done some roofing and plumbing and stumpy has some innovative uses for trivets and plumbing stuff such as a downspout to plastic piping adapter, for dust collection on a drill press table.

I was checking out current prices for adapting my dust collection to plastic piping when I ran across the collars used on the roof for vent piping. I picked up a 3 inch collar and thought I would do what stumpy does. LOL!

I previously posted the assembly of my 7 inch Harbor Freight Jointer which sat in the box for many years. The picture here is the exhaust port for the jointer. It shot wood shavings and dust EVERYWHERE.
Wood Gas Engineering Machine Metal


I had a 4inch coupler in my parts box. Set that on the 3 inch rubber collar and used my magic marker to put the diameter on the collar and proceeded to slice equal segments all around the circle. I was able to coax the adapter inside and used a wire clamp and electric tape to seal the connection. Looked Good.

sliced a triangle off each side and used window weather stripping to seal the edges and some self taping 1 inch screws that had to be coaxed into the Thin metal that the base is made from.

The results are quite adequate!

Motor vehicle Engineering Gas Auto part Machine


Bumper Gas Milling Wood Machine


I also have a discontinued Delta P300 Type 1 Planer. It too spews shavings and dust everywhere. It's ok when I work outside but too many nooks and cranny's for clean up? When I first bought it there was no specific chip shoot to attach to a dust collector and I thought I could adapt a shoot from a 12.5 inch Delta planer. NO way! Did a Google search and found they have made one for my 12 inch planer!

I was just going to attach it when Murphy showed up. (It's warmer …in the thirties here in Southern MN) and I had to take the planer apart. couldn't find my manual. So I downloaded on off the Internet. Used it for a reference , and cleaned ,de- rusted, and waxed the inside and outside and attached the dust collection hood.

Automotive design Office equipment Gas Engineering Machine


Bumper Gas Milling Wood Machine
!

So I am pretty happy that I won't be spending hours in clean up after truing my rough cut materials!

Thanks for reading along!

If anyone is interested in a dust hood for a 12.5 inch Delta Planer ( pictured below) PM me!

Font Electronic device Audio equipment Electric blue Plant
Great ideas Tom, on my bench top Delta joiner it has a square outlet shoot which I had once built a wooden dust box mounted to the planer, it worked for a while but made it heavier then I wanted it to be and also was cumbersome so I took it off, what I do now to control the chips and dust I just simply place the 4" vacuum hose at the mouth as they both rest on top of the bench and it works just as it's supposed to sucking up all the debris.
 

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MY STRAIGHTEDGE ROUGH CUTTING JIG.

MY STRAIGHTEDGE ROUGH CUTTING JIG.
First picture (jig with spalted Maple)
Wood Flooring Floor Wood stain Hardwood



The first picture you see is why I built the jig. If you have been following my journey and saw the other jig that I built for my band saw you know that this is the next step.


I am truly in awe of what Mother Nature has given me.

Picture 2 ( side view of completed straightedge jig with six-inch hold downs)

Wood Gas Table Hardwood Workbench



The next picture is my rough drawing of what a poor man's jig looks like
.
Font Handwriting Rectangle Triangle Drawing


I decided to use my bandsaw and make some hold downs. I am using whatever stock I have in my shop. I found a leftover piece of one-inch plywood that I glued together to make a base for an oak top for our bathroom vanity. I cut my hold downs out of the one-inch plywood, which look a lot like a dog bone, LOL! The ends are cams providing a rounded surface. They are drilled out to 3/8 of an inch to provide some space for the up-and-down movement of the hold downs.

I found a half inch sheet of plywood and attached a guide strip made from cedar as I have no hardwood. I then trimmed the sides by running the base through the tablesaw on both sides. The width is approximately 11 inches.

I next secured some 5 inch long quarter-inch carriage bolts. I flipped the base over and drilled out the depth of the carriage bolt head. Using some nuts and washers I secured three bolts to the base.

As with my previous projects I used waterborne poly to seal the ends and surfaces due to the fact I have extremely high humidity in my shop in the summertime. Upwards of 90% even with the air conditioner running full blast.
Picture four (spalted maple too small for 6 inch hold downs)

Table Wood Flooring Floor Hardwood


I ran the test cut on a wide piece of spalted Maple which turned out just as I had planned. I then found a narrower piece of spalted Maple (the one pictured) and realized my hold downs would not work for narrower pieces. I thought about drilling more holes, but the center track to run on the tablesaw was in the way.

Picture four (straightedge jig with 11 inch hold downs)
Wood Hardwood Flooring Wood stain Plank


Since I'm having so much fun with my bandsaw, I laid out three more hold downs, the approximate width of the base. I sanded and sealed them with waterborne poly and when it dried ran a test trial. It was a success! I think it Murphy went down south! LOL!

Picture five(straightedge jig with 11 inch hold downs showing a straight edge cut)

Wood Tool Flooring Floor Hardwood


With this success I proceeded to trim a straightedge on the small logs I had cut with my band saw jig. I cut the rest of the spalted Maple, some small Walnut logs, some cedar, and the Elm.

I'm pretty excited that I will have some very nice wood to make smaller projects or do some book match veneers with the next jig I will be making for the bandsaw.

As always, comments and humor from lumberjacks and lumber Jill's is appreciated.
Thanks for looking!
I like these jigs Tom, I'll have make some myself, thanks for sharing.

Does it ride the mitter slot?
 

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Murphy's Drill Press Table!


MURPHY'S DRILL PRESS TABLE


Built mostly by Murphy, LOL! GRRRRR!

Wood Household appliance accessory Machine tool Table Workbench


On June 4, 2013, I posted "Getting My Tools Are Ready #12 blog, which is where I showed the finished assembly of some of my shop tools, one of which was my floor model 17 inch drill press. The drill press table was designed for working with metal versus wood.

At that time, I purchased some hold downs and T tracks to eventually build a joint press table for working with wood.
My current focus is milling lumber that I can manage. I have been milling small logs on my band saw getting familiar with Resawing.

I have been in discussion with Dallas a fellow Lumberjock since my purchase of a 50 cc Poulan Pro chainsaw last year. I'd also purchased a chainsaw mill at that time. Recently Dallas offered his custom modified Poulan Pro chainsaw and an extended chainsaw mill with a 28 inch Pro blade.

In preparation I decided to build a portable chainsaw mill bench to take with me to the compost site, where there a logs to mill. The purpose of the mill bench is to elevate the log to a manageable height, and provided downhill slant for ease of milling with chainsaw mill.

Sooooooo, since I had to drill approximately 30+ accurate holes for carriage bolts to assemble the mill bench, I decided it was time to build the drill press table!

I researched the Lumberjocks site and found many novel and innovative custom tailored drill press tables. I also remembered Stumpy Nubs building his second version of the drill press table, which had some nice features that I wanted in my own drill press table. Below is the YouTube Site for Stumpy Nubs version.


I also liked Steve Ramsey's version of the drill press table and you can go to that site as noted below.


Features that i wanted to my drill press table included:

I. Dust Collection.
II. T tracks and hold downs.
III. Being able to mount to my drill press.
IV. Utilizing materials on hand in my shop.
V. Provide guidance stability for the drill press fence.

The table material is from construction plywood that was either not used or leftover. I did not install a fir tongue and groove three-quarter inch 4×8 plywood floor due to leaks coming from under the walls of my shop. (A long story.) Also, I used some half-inch plywood, which was used for extra strength in the walls of my rehab of my small animal barn into my current shop.

The title for this blog is "Murphy's Drill Press Table." This is because the he had more to do with it than I did. The project took twice as long because Murphy was in charge. And, you know Murphy's Law. "Anything that can go wrong will go wrong." LOL! Norm Abrams quotes an old carpenters phrase, "Measure Twice, Cut Once." Murphy's phrase is "if I can it up. I will."

A1Jim, a fellow lumberjock wisely said to me "Tom… Murphy is our teacher." Well, I hope I have been a good student. Many mistakes were corrected in this project and it seemed to take longer than expected.

For those of you who are interested Murphy and I are posting the steps of our struggle so that you may build your own version of our drill press table, the core concepts provided by Stumpy Nubs and Steve Ramsey.
The total thickness of the drill press table is one and a half inches, which is two three-quarter inch identical approximate 24×16" pieces. This required mounting the lower piece to the drill press with bolts. The drill press table is a machine shop type which holds devices and has an oil drip hole for drilling metal cooling.

Table Wood Rectangle Flooring Floor


This idea came to me after I had drawn lines on the plywood to drill holes for mounting it to the table. I had measured, calculated, laid out, double checked and triple checked, only to find that I screwed up somewhere. (Not laughing here.) I scribed the lines on cardboard and inserted the mounting bolts so that I'd have a physical template to readjust. The center bolt was mounted to the drill press chuck.

Wood Floor Workbench Drilling Flooring


In next picture you can see that I decided to use a hole saw to cut a 3 inch hole versus the standard square insert cut.

Hand tool Wood Tool Household hardware Gas


Stumpy Nubs had a great idea, utilizing a plumbing plastic conversion connector that connects a rectangular box to a six-inch circular plastic pipe. I purchased this at my local box store, and found that my six-inch dust collection hose would not fit. Fortunately I found a adapter which allows connecting the flexible dust pipe to a fixed dust port, which saved the day. You can find these on Amazon.com.

Wood Workbench Machine tool Machine Engineering


Fortunately I bought a lot of bar clamps, which at utilized in assembling the parts of the fence.
Insert pictures with fence and bar clamps

Oh yeah, Norm Abrams used a pin nailer to secure the edges of wood pieces he was gluing together. I thought this a great idea, but did not realize it required some skill. LOL I think it was Murphy, who is pushing my hand when I nailed this piece.

Wood Hardwood Wood stain Plank Gas


I figured out how to save myself some money and found quarter-inch by 20 knobs on Amazon which were quite inexpensive. I decided to use these instead of making them myself as they are about $.80 apiece. You can find these on Amazon.com. I decided to use carriage bolts in my grinder to allow the carriage bolts to slide in the T track.

Wood Air gun Gun barrel Shotgun Bag


I next mounted a 24 inch T track to the fence. Prior to this I used a Forstner bit to drill holes in the face of the fence to provide the suction for the table. While I was doing this, my Forstner bit went dull. At that time I posted a forum question on lumberjock's regarding carbide versus regular steel Forstner bits. I finished up with a slightly smaller Forstner bit. Note the irregularity in the face of the fence.

Circuit component Wood Table Audio equipment Engineering


I attached my dust collector to the drill press table fence and tested it for suction. It was very successful.

Camera lens Wood Reflex camera Gas Single-lens reflex camera


I attached the top layer of the drill press table by screwing through the bottom of the attached plywood. I then mounted the 18 inch T tracks and attached a 1 1/2 inch by three-quarter inch trim with slots cut for the T track. This was glued and screwed. Another use for my bar clamps.

Wood Audio equipment Gas Machine Engineering


Table Wood Machine tool Machine Hardwood


If you are interested in this version in this blog was not clear as I hoped it would be please PM me.

As always, your comments, humor, and suggestions are always welcome.
Let me be the first to favor your blog Thomas, I'm going to steal this idea and pitch my cheap HF table, As for as for as MURPHY goes you and I both kept him busy, he was in my shop as well during my miter saw station.
 

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Murphy's Drill Press Table!


MURPHY'S DRILL PRESS TABLE


Built mostly by Murphy, LOL! GRRRRR!

Wood Household appliance accessory Machine tool Table Workbench


On June 4, 2013, I posted "Getting My Tools Are Ready #12 blog, which is where I showed the finished assembly of some of my shop tools, one of which was my floor model 17 inch drill press. The drill press table was designed for working with metal versus wood.

At that time, I purchased some hold downs and T tracks to eventually build a joint press table for working with wood.
My current focus is milling lumber that I can manage. I have been milling small logs on my band saw getting familiar with Resawing.

I have been in discussion with Dallas a fellow Lumberjock since my purchase of a 50 cc Poulan Pro chainsaw last year. I'd also purchased a chainsaw mill at that time. Recently Dallas offered his custom modified Poulan Pro chainsaw and an extended chainsaw mill with a 28 inch Pro blade.

In preparation I decided to build a portable chainsaw mill bench to take with me to the compost site, where there a logs to mill. The purpose of the mill bench is to elevate the log to a manageable height, and provided downhill slant for ease of milling with chainsaw mill.

Sooooooo, since I had to drill approximately 30+ accurate holes for carriage bolts to assemble the mill bench, I decided it was time to build the drill press table!

I researched the Lumberjocks site and found many novel and innovative custom tailored drill press tables. I also remembered Stumpy Nubs building his second version of the drill press table, which had some nice features that I wanted in my own drill press table. Below is the YouTube Site for Stumpy Nubs version.


I also liked Steve Ramsey's version of the drill press table and you can go to that site as noted below.


Features that i wanted to my drill press table included:

I. Dust Collection.
II. T tracks and hold downs.
III. Being able to mount to my drill press.
IV. Utilizing materials on hand in my shop.
V. Provide guidance stability for the drill press fence.

The table material is from construction plywood that was either not used or leftover. I did not install a fir tongue and groove three-quarter inch 4×8 plywood floor due to leaks coming from under the walls of my shop. (A long story.) Also, I used some half-inch plywood, which was used for extra strength in the walls of my rehab of my small animal barn into my current shop.

The title for this blog is "Murphy's Drill Press Table." This is because the he had more to do with it than I did. The project took twice as long because Murphy was in charge. And, you know Murphy's Law. "Anything that can go wrong will go wrong." LOL! Norm Abrams quotes an old carpenters phrase, "Measure Twice, Cut Once." Murphy's phrase is "if I can it up. I will."

A1Jim, a fellow lumberjock wisely said to me "Tom… Murphy is our teacher." Well, I hope I have been a good student. Many mistakes were corrected in this project and it seemed to take longer than expected.

For those of you who are interested Murphy and I are posting the steps of our struggle so that you may build your own version of our drill press table, the core concepts provided by Stumpy Nubs and Steve Ramsey.
The total thickness of the drill press table is one and a half inches, which is two three-quarter inch identical approximate 24×16" pieces. This required mounting the lower piece to the drill press with bolts. The drill press table is a machine shop type which holds devices and has an oil drip hole for drilling metal cooling.

Table Wood Rectangle Flooring Floor


This idea came to me after I had drawn lines on the plywood to drill holes for mounting it to the table. I had measured, calculated, laid out, double checked and triple checked, only to find that I screwed up somewhere. (Not laughing here.) I scribed the lines on cardboard and inserted the mounting bolts so that I'd have a physical template to readjust. The center bolt was mounted to the drill press chuck.

Wood Floor Workbench Drilling Flooring


In next picture you can see that I decided to use a hole saw to cut a 3 inch hole versus the standard square insert cut.

Hand tool Wood Tool Household hardware Gas


Stumpy Nubs had a great idea, utilizing a plumbing plastic conversion connector that connects a rectangular box to a six-inch circular plastic pipe. I purchased this at my local box store, and found that my six-inch dust collection hose would not fit. Fortunately I found a adapter which allows connecting the flexible dust pipe to a fixed dust port, which saved the day. You can find these on Amazon.com.

Wood Workbench Machine tool Machine Engineering


Fortunately I bought a lot of bar clamps, which at utilized in assembling the parts of the fence.
Insert pictures with fence and bar clamps

Oh yeah, Norm Abrams used a pin nailer to secure the edges of wood pieces he was gluing together. I thought this a great idea, but did not realize it required some skill. LOL I think it was Murphy, who is pushing my hand when I nailed this piece.

Wood Hardwood Wood stain Plank Gas


I figured out how to save myself some money and found quarter-inch by 20 knobs on Amazon which were quite inexpensive. I decided to use these instead of making them myself as they are about $.80 apiece. You can find these on Amazon.com. I decided to use carriage bolts in my grinder to allow the carriage bolts to slide in the T track.

Wood Air gun Gun barrel Shotgun Bag


I next mounted a 24 inch T track to the fence. Prior to this I used a Forstner bit to drill holes in the face of the fence to provide the suction for the table. While I was doing this, my Forstner bit went dull. At that time I posted a forum question on lumberjock's regarding carbide versus regular steel Forstner bits. I finished up with a slightly smaller Forstner bit. Note the irregularity in the face of the fence.

Circuit component Wood Table Audio equipment Engineering


I attached my dust collector to the drill press table fence and tested it for suction. It was very successful.

Camera lens Wood Reflex camera Gas Single-lens reflex camera


I attached the top layer of the drill press table by screwing through the bottom of the attached plywood. I then mounted the 18 inch T tracks and attached a 1 1/2 inch by three-quarter inch trim with slots cut for the T track. This was glued and screwed. Another use for my bar clamps.

Wood Audio equipment Gas Machine Engineering


Table Wood Machine tool Machine Hardwood


If you are interested in this version in this blog was not clear as I hoped it would be please PM me.

As always, your comments, humor, and suggestions are always welcome.
Thomas, I just viewed the Stumpy Nubs video, I like how you put your own spin on the table and thanks for the detailed instructions in your blog on how to build it, the only thing that I can see that I would do differently, instead of drilling duct holes on the upper face of the fence, I would instead take that face board over to the box cutter jig and cut 1/2 square holes on the very bottom base of that fence about a 3/8" to 1/2" high from the bottom up and every 1/2" apart that way no saw dust or wood chips can get between the fence and the work piece, that's the problem I have with my table now.
 

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Murphy's Drill Press Table!


MURPHY'S DRILL PRESS TABLE


Built mostly by Murphy, LOL! GRRRRR!

Wood Household appliance accessory Machine tool Table Workbench


On June 4, 2013, I posted "Getting My Tools Are Ready #12 blog, which is where I showed the finished assembly of some of my shop tools, one of which was my floor model 17 inch drill press. The drill press table was designed for working with metal versus wood.

At that time, I purchased some hold downs and T tracks to eventually build a joint press table for working with wood.
My current focus is milling lumber that I can manage. I have been milling small logs on my band saw getting familiar with Resawing.

I have been in discussion with Dallas a fellow Lumberjock since my purchase of a 50 cc Poulan Pro chainsaw last year. I'd also purchased a chainsaw mill at that time. Recently Dallas offered his custom modified Poulan Pro chainsaw and an extended chainsaw mill with a 28 inch Pro blade.

In preparation I decided to build a portable chainsaw mill bench to take with me to the compost site, where there a logs to mill. The purpose of the mill bench is to elevate the log to a manageable height, and provided downhill slant for ease of milling with chainsaw mill.

Sooooooo, since I had to drill approximately 30+ accurate holes for carriage bolts to assemble the mill bench, I decided it was time to build the drill press table!

I researched the Lumberjocks site and found many novel and innovative custom tailored drill press tables. I also remembered Stumpy Nubs building his second version of the drill press table, which had some nice features that I wanted in my own drill press table. Below is the YouTube Site for Stumpy Nubs version.


I also liked Steve Ramsey's version of the drill press table and you can go to that site as noted below.


Features that i wanted to my drill press table included:

I. Dust Collection.
II. T tracks and hold downs.
III. Being able to mount to my drill press.
IV. Utilizing materials on hand in my shop.
V. Provide guidance stability for the drill press fence.

The table material is from construction plywood that was either not used or leftover. I did not install a fir tongue and groove three-quarter inch 4×8 plywood floor due to leaks coming from under the walls of my shop. (A long story.) Also, I used some half-inch plywood, which was used for extra strength in the walls of my rehab of my small animal barn into my current shop.

The title for this blog is "Murphy's Drill Press Table." This is because the he had more to do with it than I did. The project took twice as long because Murphy was in charge. And, you know Murphy's Law. "Anything that can go wrong will go wrong." LOL! Norm Abrams quotes an old carpenters phrase, "Measure Twice, Cut Once." Murphy's phrase is "if I can it up. I will."

A1Jim, a fellow lumberjock wisely said to me "Tom… Murphy is our teacher." Well, I hope I have been a good student. Many mistakes were corrected in this project and it seemed to take longer than expected.

For those of you who are interested Murphy and I are posting the steps of our struggle so that you may build your own version of our drill press table, the core concepts provided by Stumpy Nubs and Steve Ramsey.
The total thickness of the drill press table is one and a half inches, which is two three-quarter inch identical approximate 24×16" pieces. This required mounting the lower piece to the drill press with bolts. The drill press table is a machine shop type which holds devices and has an oil drip hole for drilling metal cooling.

Table Wood Rectangle Flooring Floor


This idea came to me after I had drawn lines on the plywood to drill holes for mounting it to the table. I had measured, calculated, laid out, double checked and triple checked, only to find that I screwed up somewhere. (Not laughing here.) I scribed the lines on cardboard and inserted the mounting bolts so that I'd have a physical template to readjust. The center bolt was mounted to the drill press chuck.

Wood Floor Workbench Drilling Flooring


In next picture you can see that I decided to use a hole saw to cut a 3 inch hole versus the standard square insert cut.

Hand tool Wood Tool Household hardware Gas


Stumpy Nubs had a great idea, utilizing a plumbing plastic conversion connector that connects a rectangular box to a six-inch circular plastic pipe. I purchased this at my local box store, and found that my six-inch dust collection hose would not fit. Fortunately I found a adapter which allows connecting the flexible dust pipe to a fixed dust port, which saved the day. You can find these on Amazon.com.

Wood Workbench Machine tool Machine Engineering


Fortunately I bought a lot of bar clamps, which at utilized in assembling the parts of the fence.
Insert pictures with fence and bar clamps

Oh yeah, Norm Abrams used a pin nailer to secure the edges of wood pieces he was gluing together. I thought this a great idea, but did not realize it required some skill. LOL I think it was Murphy, who is pushing my hand when I nailed this piece.

Wood Hardwood Wood stain Plank Gas


I figured out how to save myself some money and found quarter-inch by 20 knobs on Amazon which were quite inexpensive. I decided to use these instead of making them myself as they are about $.80 apiece. You can find these on Amazon.com. I decided to use carriage bolts in my grinder to allow the carriage bolts to slide in the T track.

Wood Air gun Gun barrel Shotgun Bag


I next mounted a 24 inch T track to the fence. Prior to this I used a Forstner bit to drill holes in the face of the fence to provide the suction for the table. While I was doing this, my Forstner bit went dull. At that time I posted a forum question on lumberjock's regarding carbide versus regular steel Forstner bits. I finished up with a slightly smaller Forstner bit. Note the irregularity in the face of the fence.

Circuit component Wood Table Audio equipment Engineering


I attached my dust collector to the drill press table fence and tested it for suction. It was very successful.

Camera lens Wood Reflex camera Gas Single-lens reflex camera


I attached the top layer of the drill press table by screwing through the bottom of the attached plywood. I then mounted the 18 inch T tracks and attached a 1 1/2 inch by three-quarter inch trim with slots cut for the T track. This was glued and screwed. Another use for my bar clamps.

Wood Audio equipment Gas Machine Engineering


Table Wood Machine tool Machine Hardwood


If you are interested in this version in this blog was not clear as I hoped it would be please PM me.

As always, your comments, humor, and suggestions are always welcome.
Yep, that's the problem I have now with my HF table, the drill press handles connect with the miter slot star knobs on the fence, I have to at times unscrew the knobs from the drill press handles in order to make a complete rotation of the handle.
 

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MURPHY'S DRILL PRESS TABLE EXTENSION JIG

MURPHY'S DRILL PRESS TABLE EXTENSION JIG

After I finished working on the drill press table and posting it on LJ's I drilled out 30+ holes accurately for my next project. I am building a chainsaw mill bench/stand. I was pleased that I accurately drilled the holes for the carriage bolts in the supports and cross members.

My next task was to pre-drill screw holes in the support bracing that will hold the cross members and supports.

I stood there thinking "how am I going to drill these accurately," and it came to me that I needed an accurate extension arm very similar to the kind used on crosscutting sleds. I was very fortunate to find a pristine four by three-quarter piece of clear pine which is unusual for my shop.

I sanded the pine board up to 220 grit, and coated it with two coats Of Seal Coat. I apparently did a good job or maybe it was just a really good piece of wood, but with a slight rubbing of four ought steel wool it was ready for marking. I purchased a fine and an extra fine sharpie.

I wanted to set up an accurate rule in one-inch segments that extended from the center of the drill chuck. This indeed was the most difficult part for me in that I am easily influenced by Murphy toward impatience and inaccuracy. You can see in the first picture that it was time for a coffee break. LOL!

Ruler Wood Musical instrument Office ruler Tool


After patiently marking the one-inch segments and accurately drilling holes at the zero, 10 inch, 20 inch, and 24 inch marks, two coats of waterborne poly were applied. After it dried. I attached the end piece that holds extended board with glue, nails and two screws.
Wood Gas Hardwood Flooring Machine tool


Wood Office ruler Ruler Tool Flooring


I scribed lines from top to bottom at the zero mark, and 2 inch mark in both directions from center.

Wood Hardwood Machine tool Workbench Tool


Wood Tool Workbench Drill Milling


You can see from the back of the drill press the extended arm with stop. You can also see that I drew a line with the sharpie that goes through the center of the drill press table to line up to zero mark on the drill press fence and extension.

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You can also see that the extended arm can also provide one-inch reference points when necessary in order to drill other types of holes.

Wood Table Workbench Machine tool Flooring



Thanks for checking this out! As always, your comments, criticisms and witticisms are always welcome!
Nice Tom, what size is your drill press?

Did you hand draw each segment onto the top of the fence? I belive there is adhesive backing measuring tape that maybe of worked?

By the way my bench is done to lazy to post it tonight so I'll post it in the morning along with the addition finale on my blog
 

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MURPHY'S DRILL PRESS TABLE EXTENSION JIG

MURPHY'S DRILL PRESS TABLE EXTENSION JIG

After I finished working on the drill press table and posting it on LJ's I drilled out 30+ holes accurately for my next project. I am building a chainsaw mill bench/stand. I was pleased that I accurately drilled the holes for the carriage bolts in the supports and cross members.

My next task was to pre-drill screw holes in the support bracing that will hold the cross members and supports.

I stood there thinking "how am I going to drill these accurately," and it came to me that I needed an accurate extension arm very similar to the kind used on crosscutting sleds. I was very fortunate to find a pristine four by three-quarter piece of clear pine which is unusual for my shop.

I sanded the pine board up to 220 grit, and coated it with two coats Of Seal Coat. I apparently did a good job or maybe it was just a really good piece of wood, but with a slight rubbing of four ought steel wool it was ready for marking. I purchased a fine and an extra fine sharpie.

I wanted to set up an accurate rule in one-inch segments that extended from the center of the drill chuck. This indeed was the most difficult part for me in that I am easily influenced by Murphy toward impatience and inaccuracy. You can see in the first picture that it was time for a coffee break. LOL!

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After patiently marking the one-inch segments and accurately drilling holes at the zero, 10 inch, 20 inch, and 24 inch marks, two coats of waterborne poly were applied. After it dried. I attached the end piece that holds extended board with glue, nails and two screws.
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Wood Office ruler Ruler Tool Flooring


I scribed lines from top to bottom at the zero mark, and 2 inch mark in both directions from center.

Wood Hardwood Machine tool Workbench Tool


Wood Tool Workbench Drill Milling


You can see from the back of the drill press the extended arm with stop. You can also see that I drew a line with the sharpie that goes through the center of the drill press table to line up to zero mark on the drill press fence and extension.

Wood Flooring Floor Hardwood Wood stain


You can also see that the extended arm can also provide one-inch reference points when necessary in order to drill other types of holes.

Wood Table Workbench Machine tool Flooring



Thanks for checking this out! As always, your comments, criticisms and witticisms are always welcome!
Ah ok, mine is 15" floor model in which that extra 3 inches you have makes a big difference when it comes to a table and fence, I don't have the room I'd like to work with.
 

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