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Was rumaging through my dads shop which isn't used anymore and found this router. Can anyone tell me anything about it and whether it's useful for edging and whatnot? Or is it so outdated that I would be better just getting a new one?

Wood Gas Electrical supply Electrical wiring Machine
 

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Tools don't ever go out of date. I can't make out the brand but it doesn't matter that much if it works. Clean it up and use it. Today most newer routers have a 1/2 inch chuck and they are desirable but the 1/4 inch chuck routers are still useful.
 

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If it runs, you could set it up for a specific task. Examples might be a flush trim bit, or a roundover bit. Something you might do on occasion. Just grab it and go. No hassle changing bits. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I guess I need to familiarize myself with the tool. I saw people using the newer ones and it looked like there was a mechanism that allowed it to drop down. How the heck would you keep this one straight??
 

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You have to loosen the lock to be able to adjust the height of cut. If you haven't used a router before ,hand held routers always are used left to right and with many operations you need some sort of guide or fence to make grooves or dados. These types of routers do not compare to newer routers but their better than no router at all.
 

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Will I be able to use any bit a newer one could use?

- MissouriOutdoors88
Yes if it is the same shank diameter. Most router bits come in 1/4 inch or 1/2 inch shank diameter. There are also metric sizes available.

What you have pictured is called a fixed base. To use it, loosen the locking mechanism, turn the ring to adjust the bit height (cutting depth), tighten the locking mechanism. You are ready to rout.

The other model of router bases are called plunge bases. They are spring loaded. To use them, press the locking mechanism to unlock the router, lower the router to the desired depth, which will allow you to plunge the bit into the workpiece. You can preset your cutting depth with stops provided on a turret.

The fixed base router models are perfect when installed under a router table. The plunge base models are great for hand held work.

With the router pictured, you could use it hand held to rout the edge of a board, make flush trim cuts, cut dadoes and a lot more.

Search You Tube for "How to use a router". that should keep you busy for a while. :)
 

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88 go onto youtube and watch some videos so you don't do something stupid and hurt yourself. They are pretty straight forward but if you have no experience at all with them it would be to your benefit to learn more first.
 
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