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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Preparing to prep the wood before I start to get ready to begin to start the project

Here goes my first blog. This is basically a continuation of my forum question:

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/18730

I picked up the boards yesterday from a carpenter in Creedmoor, North Carolina. He told me it was from a two-story 1850's barn on his property. He also had the old beams sitting around, the hand-carved pegs from the beam's tenon's, and a board where someone was calculating profit on cotton prices and dated it 1929. Pretty cool stuff, didn't even know they grew cotton here at that time.

I was going to rent a belt sander for this per recommendations here, and then remembered a buddy I used to work with who might have one. He didn't, but he did have a 3" electric hand planer though, so I decided to give that a shot before spending the money on the belt sander rental. Mixed results on that so far, as you can see in the pic's. I also tried the ROS on the bare wood, with 60-grit paper, barely touched it. But the ROS did do a decent job of smoothing the ridges left by the planer.

Now, I have to decide how much I want to clean these boards up before proceding with the project. There are depressions that are filled with grit and what not that I could not scrub off with a brush for the life of me. Planer, ROS, water hose, and compressed air, all got some of it, but there are some spots left they're not getting to. I think the spots actually look pretty decent, some added character, but I have no idea how they'll look once I put a finish on the boards and I don't want to regret leaving them on later. Most of these spots are in the middle of my boards and I don't have a lot of extra material, so it'd be tough to do finishing experiments on it. So I'm thinking about trying some TSP on it to see how that goes.

Anyway, I'm not much of a photographer, but here's my attempt to show you all what I've got and what I've done to it so far.

Thanks for checking out my blog!





!http://i1013.photobucket.com/albums/af257/aventnc1/039.jpg!

 

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Preparing to prep the wood before I start to get ready to begin to start the project

Here goes my first blog. This is basically a continuation of my forum question:

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/18730

I picked up the boards yesterday from a carpenter in Creedmoor, North Carolina. He told me it was from a two-story 1850's barn on his property. He also had the old beams sitting around, the hand-carved pegs from the beam's tenon's, and a board where someone was calculating profit on cotton prices and dated it 1929. Pretty cool stuff, didn't even know they grew cotton here at that time.

I was going to rent a belt sander for this per recommendations here, and then remembered a buddy I used to work with who might have one. He didn't, but he did have a 3" electric hand planer though, so I decided to give that a shot before spending the money on the belt sander rental. Mixed results on that so far, as you can see in the pic's. I also tried the ROS on the bare wood, with 60-grit paper, barely touched it. But the ROS did do a decent job of smoothing the ridges left by the planer.

Now, I have to decide how much I want to clean these boards up before proceding with the project. There are depressions that are filled with grit and what not that I could not scrub off with a brush for the life of me. Planer, ROS, water hose, and compressed air, all got some of it, but there are some spots left they're not getting to. I think the spots actually look pretty decent, some added character, but I have no idea how they'll look once I put a finish on the boards and I don't want to regret leaving them on later. Most of these spots are in the middle of my boards and I don't have a lot of extra material, so it'd be tough to do finishing experiments on it. So I'm thinking about trying some TSP on it to see how that goes.

Anyway, I'm not much of a photographer, but here's my attempt to show you all what I've got and what I've done to it so far.

Thanks for checking out my blog!





!http://i1013.photobucket.com/albums/af257/aventnc1/039.jpg!

Looks like the wood is in fairly good shape.

From the little digging around that I've done … that's really a hit or miss issue.

Keep the blog going, and the pics coming, huh ? :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Preparing to prep the wood before I start to get ready to begin to start the project

Here goes my first blog. This is basically a continuation of my forum question:

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/18730

I picked up the boards yesterday from a carpenter in Creedmoor, North Carolina. He told me it was from a two-story 1850's barn on his property. He also had the old beams sitting around, the hand-carved pegs from the beam's tenon's, and a board where someone was calculating profit on cotton prices and dated it 1929. Pretty cool stuff, didn't even know they grew cotton here at that time.

I was going to rent a belt sander for this per recommendations here, and then remembered a buddy I used to work with who might have one. He didn't, but he did have a 3" electric hand planer though, so I decided to give that a shot before spending the money on the belt sander rental. Mixed results on that so far, as you can see in the pic's. I also tried the ROS on the bare wood, with 60-grit paper, barely touched it. But the ROS did do a decent job of smoothing the ridges left by the planer.

Now, I have to decide how much I want to clean these boards up before proceding with the project. There are depressions that are filled with grit and what not that I could not scrub off with a brush for the life of me. Planer, ROS, water hose, and compressed air, all got some of it, but there are some spots left they're not getting to. I think the spots actually look pretty decent, some added character, but I have no idea how they'll look once I put a finish on the boards and I don't want to regret leaving them on later. Most of these spots are in the middle of my boards and I don't have a lot of extra material, so it'd be tough to do finishing experiments on it. So I'm thinking about trying some TSP on it to see how that goes.

Anyway, I'm not much of a photographer, but here's my attempt to show you all what I've got and what I've done to it so far.

Thanks for checking out my blog!





!http://i1013.photobucket.com/albums/af257/aventnc1/039.jpg!

Will do, but I'm a working/family guy, may be a week or two. Stay tuned!
 

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Preparing to prep the wood before I start to get ready to begin to start the project

Here goes my first blog. This is basically a continuation of my forum question:

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/18730

I picked up the boards yesterday from a carpenter in Creedmoor, North Carolina. He told me it was from a two-story 1850's barn on his property. He also had the old beams sitting around, the hand-carved pegs from the beam's tenon's, and a board where someone was calculating profit on cotton prices and dated it 1929. Pretty cool stuff, didn't even know they grew cotton here at that time.

I was going to rent a belt sander for this per recommendations here, and then remembered a buddy I used to work with who might have one. He didn't, but he did have a 3" electric hand planer though, so I decided to give that a shot before spending the money on the belt sander rental. Mixed results on that so far, as you can see in the pic's. I also tried the ROS on the bare wood, with 60-grit paper, barely touched it. But the ROS did do a decent job of smoothing the ridges left by the planer.

Now, I have to decide how much I want to clean these boards up before proceding with the project. There are depressions that are filled with grit and what not that I could not scrub off with a brush for the life of me. Planer, ROS, water hose, and compressed air, all got some of it, but there are some spots left they're not getting to. I think the spots actually look pretty decent, some added character, but I have no idea how they'll look once I put a finish on the boards and I don't want to regret leaving them on later. Most of these spots are in the middle of my boards and I don't have a lot of extra material, so it'd be tough to do finishing experiments on it. So I'm thinking about trying some TSP on it to see how that goes.

Anyway, I'm not much of a photographer, but here's my attempt to show you all what I've got and what I've done to it so far.

Thanks for checking out my blog!





!http://i1013.photobucket.com/albums/af257/aventnc1/039.jpg!

Well you started. You have the boards !
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Barn Boards Are Prepped...

So I've spent the few hours per weekend I have to work on this, basically trying to clean up the wood. This has been a big learning experience. There was a lot of grit, dirt, dust, etc, wedged into these boards, as one would expect from 150 year-old barn boards. I also wanted to remove as little wood as possible. Here's the methods I tried that did not work as I hoped:

ROS - did pretty much did nothing on it's own.

Electric hand planer - I could not find that fine line between taking off the top film and not removing too much wood. Plus it left some pretty serious ridges in the boards, but the ROS did a decent job of smoothing those out.

3×21 Belt Sander - Worked OK, but like the planer, was taking off more wood than I wanted. Tried 40, 60, and 80 grit.

Pressure washer - even if you get the pressure settings right so you don't blow right through the wood, there's also the problem that as soon as the boards get wet, they get a lot darker and it's hard to even see the dirt.

Finally in the end, what did the job best to my liking was a 3M abrasive stripping sponge and a little elbow grease. The pads were able to get into all those cracks and crevices easily and absorbed a lot of crap before getting clogged. Plus they cleaned up the exposed splintered areas that didn't protrude to the top, such as inside the nail holes. They somehow don't remove any noticable amount of wood or patina, and yet the surface they left was surprisingly smooth. Since this is a relatively rustic project and I'm not looking for much of a sheen, I didn't do any real sanding, just switched to a medium synthetic steel wool pad and ran it over the boards once or twice.

Since this is just a simple farmhouse table I'm building, it took all of about an hour to cut the boards into shape on the table saw, and I went ahead and added the first coat of finish, pure tung oil. The pic's were taken after the tung. So here's how the boards look now.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket
 

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Barn Boards Are Prepped...

So I've spent the few hours per weekend I have to work on this, basically trying to clean up the wood. This has been a big learning experience. There was a lot of grit, dirt, dust, etc, wedged into these boards, as one would expect from 150 year-old barn boards. I also wanted to remove as little wood as possible. Here's the methods I tried that did not work as I hoped:

ROS - did pretty much did nothing on it's own.

Electric hand planer - I could not find that fine line between taking off the top film and not removing too much wood. Plus it left some pretty serious ridges in the boards, but the ROS did a decent job of smoothing those out.

3×21 Belt Sander - Worked OK, but like the planer, was taking off more wood than I wanted. Tried 40, 60, and 80 grit.

Pressure washer - even if you get the pressure settings right so you don't blow right through the wood, there's also the problem that as soon as the boards get wet, they get a lot darker and it's hard to even see the dirt.

Finally in the end, what did the job best to my liking was a 3M abrasive stripping sponge and a little elbow grease. The pads were able to get into all those cracks and crevices easily and absorbed a lot of crap before getting clogged. Plus they cleaned up the exposed splintered areas that didn't protrude to the top, such as inside the nail holes. They somehow don't remove any noticable amount of wood or patina, and yet the surface they left was surprisingly smooth. Since this is a relatively rustic project and I'm not looking for much of a sheen, I didn't do any real sanding, just switched to a medium synthetic steel wool pad and ran it over the boards once or twice.

Since this is just a simple farmhouse table I'm building, it took all of about an hour to cut the boards into shape on the table saw, and I went ahead and added the first coat of finish, pure tung oil. The pic's were taken after the tung. So here's how the boards look now.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket
Good looking boards, Nice reclamation!

Erwin, Jacksonville, FL
 

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Barn Boards Are Prepped...

So I've spent the few hours per weekend I have to work on this, basically trying to clean up the wood. This has been a big learning experience. There was a lot of grit, dirt, dust, etc, wedged into these boards, as one would expect from 150 year-old barn boards. I also wanted to remove as little wood as possible. Here's the methods I tried that did not work as I hoped:

ROS - did pretty much did nothing on it's own.

Electric hand planer - I could not find that fine line between taking off the top film and not removing too much wood. Plus it left some pretty serious ridges in the boards, but the ROS did a decent job of smoothing those out.

3×21 Belt Sander - Worked OK, but like the planer, was taking off more wood than I wanted. Tried 40, 60, and 80 grit.

Pressure washer - even if you get the pressure settings right so you don't blow right through the wood, there's also the problem that as soon as the boards get wet, they get a lot darker and it's hard to even see the dirt.

Finally in the end, what did the job best to my liking was a 3M abrasive stripping sponge and a little elbow grease. The pads were able to get into all those cracks and crevices easily and absorbed a lot of crap before getting clogged. Plus they cleaned up the exposed splintered areas that didn't protrude to the top, such as inside the nail holes. They somehow don't remove any noticable amount of wood or patina, and yet the surface they left was surprisingly smooth. Since this is a relatively rustic project and I'm not looking for much of a sheen, I didn't do any real sanding, just switched to a medium synthetic steel wool pad and ran it over the boards once or twice.

Since this is just a simple farmhouse table I'm building, it took all of about an hour to cut the boards into shape on the table saw, and I went ahead and added the first coat of finish, pure tung oil. The pic's were taken after the tung. So here's how the boards look now.

Photobucket

Photobucket

Photobucket
nice work on reclaiming the surface.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Assembled the base

Greetings all. I assembled the base this week and took a couple pic's. I haven't put the top on yet, just sat the boards there to get an idea how it'd look.

I was originally going to make loose tenons for the leg to apron joints on this table, but with the twist I had in the aprons, there was really no way to use any serious joinery here, at least with my skill set. I really didn't want to remove the material needed to correct the twist, so instead I decided to use pocket holes. I know, I know, not recommended for a table, but the aprons are wide enough that I could fit four screws per joint. I used glue, plus corner brackets bolted into the legs. I also ran a 1×4 stretcher across the middle, to act as blocking and spread the load, not to mention support for the middle of the top.

I do have a bit of a problem right now, though. Somewhere along the way I made a miscalculation and the overhang of the sides is a little more than the ends. I'm not happy with that, so… I could make the top a little narrower, but I think what I'm going to attempt first is to make "faux" breadboard ends. I'll put one pocket per end of each board, directly in the center, hopefully avoiding movement issues down the road. We'll see, I guess.

Photobucket

Photobucket
 

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Assembled the base

Greetings all. I assembled the base this week and took a couple pic's. I haven't put the top on yet, just sat the boards there to get an idea how it'd look.

I was originally going to make loose tenons for the leg to apron joints on this table, but with the twist I had in the aprons, there was really no way to use any serious joinery here, at least with my skill set. I really didn't want to remove the material needed to correct the twist, so instead I decided to use pocket holes. I know, I know, not recommended for a table, but the aprons are wide enough that I could fit four screws per joint. I used glue, plus corner brackets bolted into the legs. I also ran a 1×4 stretcher across the middle, to act as blocking and spread the load, not to mention support for the middle of the top.

I do have a bit of a problem right now, though. Somewhere along the way I made a miscalculation and the overhang of the sides is a little more than the ends. I'm not happy with that, so… I could make the top a little narrower, but I think what I'm going to attempt first is to make "faux" breadboard ends. I'll put one pocket per end of each board, directly in the center, hopefully avoiding movement issues down the road. We'll see, I guess.

Photobucket

Photobucket
great lookin table so far … the boards pine or fir? Any idea where they came from
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Assembled the base

Greetings all. I assembled the base this week and took a couple pic's. I haven't put the top on yet, just sat the boards there to get an idea how it'd look.

I was originally going to make loose tenons for the leg to apron joints on this table, but with the twist I had in the aprons, there was really no way to use any serious joinery here, at least with my skill set. I really didn't want to remove the material needed to correct the twist, so instead I decided to use pocket holes. I know, I know, not recommended for a table, but the aprons are wide enough that I could fit four screws per joint. I used glue, plus corner brackets bolted into the legs. I also ran a 1×4 stretcher across the middle, to act as blocking and spread the load, not to mention support for the middle of the top.

I do have a bit of a problem right now, though. Somewhere along the way I made a miscalculation and the overhang of the sides is a little more than the ends. I'm not happy with that, so… I could make the top a little narrower, but I think what I'm going to attempt first is to make "faux" breadboard ends. I'll put one pocket per end of each board, directly in the center, hopefully avoiding movement issues down the road. We'll see, I guess.

Photobucket

Photobucket
Thanks. The top and aprons are Southern Yellow Pine. I got them here in NC from an 1850's barn that was torn down. The legs are white pine that I bought from an Amish shop in Pennsylvania while on vacation earlier this summer.
 
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