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I'm building a headboard and baseboard to attach to a bed frame. I'm making panels out of Goncala Alves and framing them in walnut. the goncala is reddish brown with black streaks/rings in it and I want to stain/finish the walnut damn near black to match & contrast the goncala.

Any tips would be helpful, as I've primarily worked with maple & birch, never gone black before. but i will come back.
 

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Walnut has tannin, if you want it black, you can use the rust stain ( its like magic) Take some rusty stuff and encourage more rust, soak in white vinegar for 4-5 days, rust is dissolved, rinse ex rusty stuff in water, dry coat with wd40 to prevent future rust, wipe rust and vinegar solution on tannic wood ( notably oak and walnut) watch nothing happen, turn around thinking you screwed up the recipe, look back in wonderment as the stain has turned black, give a light sand ( knock down raised grain)and repeat. This is a chemical reaction and it will not fade. If you don't have rusty stuff ( not everyone does) use 2 pads of steel wool, rinse off the oil and wax the manufactures use to prevent rust. Just a not, a drop of dish washing soap in the solution will change the surface tension, allowing the stain to penetrate into the pores, grain will be still visible but the result is less dramatic, and more black. Place steel wool in a shallow pan ( pie plate, that the wife never uses(darn it)) with some water, and turn it over daily until water has evaporated, and rust is formed. then add vinegar. I don't know anything about goncala, or if it has tannin, so test it first, but there should not be any bleeding once the stain is dry.
Good luck, let us know how it turns out.
You can check out this project I just posted a few weeks ago. http://lumberjocks.com/projects/29430
 

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I use black dye.

One of my big issues is compatibility. I can use dye in solvent and I know that I am not treating the wood with a solution that is incompatible with the finish over the long term.

Many issues with finish do not reveal themselves right away. I want security knowing that 1 or 2 years later, the chemicals I used on the wood do not create a reaction with the finish only to cause it to release, crack, or deteriorate in some manner.
 
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