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Joined
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6,114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Vac hose holder for MFT3, or any work table

Vac hose holder for MFT3
or any work table.

Just a tiny practical project, I actually made while making my systainer router table.
Decided to make a workshop version for my MFT3 worktable, or where ever I want to use it in the workshop, just connect the shop vac, when ever I need suction while working on a project, to avoid chips or dust all over the shop and be kind to my lungs.


At first I just gave it a simple swivel base, using a bench dog to keep it together.


Scrap piece from a vac hose, I found in the trash.


Made a new base with 20mm holes, so it can be held in place easy, by dumping in a long bench dog.


Also the size is a bit bigger, so it gives more stability, when free standing.


A bolt goes up into the bench dog.


Finally it can be clamped down, or up!
If you are working on a project, it can be clamped on any where you need dust removed, while working on it.

Little simple practical thingy, anyone can easily make.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, perhaps less dust.

Best thoughts,

MaFe
 

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Joined
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6,114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Vac hose holder for MFT3, or any work table

Vac hose holder for MFT3
or any work table.

Just a tiny practical project, I actually made while making my systainer router table.
Decided to make a workshop version for my MFT3 worktable, or where ever I want to use it in the workshop, just connect the shop vac, when ever I need suction while working on a project, to avoid chips or dust all over the shop and be kind to my lungs.


At first I just gave it a simple swivel base, using a bench dog to keep it together.


Scrap piece from a vac hose, I found in the trash.


Made a new base with 20mm holes, so it can be held in place easy, by dumping in a long bench dog.


Also the size is a bit bigger, so it gives more stability, when free standing.


A bolt goes up into the bench dog.


Finally it can be clamped down, or up!
If you are working on a project, it can be clamped on any where you need dust removed, while working on it.

Little simple practical thingy, anyone can easily make.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, perhaps less dust.

Best thoughts,

MaFe
Smiles Jim and Lew, less is plenty as I like to say.
Thanks Jim, yes I love to go by that rule.
Thanks Lew, I look forward to have to clamp somewhere stupid, where it would otherwise be impossible, Laugh.
But it will be useful many places also on my lathe.
Best thoughts to both of you,
Mads
 

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Joined
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6,114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Vac hose holder for MFT3, or any work table

Vac hose holder for MFT3
or any work table.

Just a tiny practical project, I actually made while making my systainer router table.
Decided to make a workshop version for my MFT3 worktable, or where ever I want to use it in the workshop, just connect the shop vac, when ever I need suction while working on a project, to avoid chips or dust all over the shop and be kind to my lungs.


At first I just gave it a simple swivel base, using a bench dog to keep it together.


Scrap piece from a vac hose, I found in the trash.


Made a new base with 20mm holes, so it can be held in place easy, by dumping in a long bench dog.


Also the size is a bit bigger, so it gives more stability, when free standing.


A bolt goes up into the bench dog.


Finally it can be clamped down, or up!
If you are working on a project, it can be clamped on any where you need dust removed, while working on it.

Little simple practical thingy, anyone can easily make.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, perhaps less dust.

Best thoughts,

MaFe
Brit, big laugh Andy, as you know I don't have a wife… I have a lover, hmmmm, I might have to ask her…
Thank you and a big smile.
 

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Joined
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6,114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #36 ·
CMS cross cut sled fast mount, easy to use.

Festool CMS cross cut sled
fast mount, easy to use.

Here a little idea I got the other day, to make my latest cross cut sled for the Festool CMS table more easy to use. Normally it was screwed in place, with two wing nuts, to secure the sled to the fence, but it meant that I found it time consuming to take it on and off, what lead to often not using it…

So I came up with this little mount, that simply clicks in place and where I don't need to fine adjust the fence to fit to the screws.

I have not made a blog on the cross cut sled, as this is quite basic and you will be able to find plenty of build plans for that, but I will go through it.


Here the sled, mounted on the CMS table, before I made the new mount.
A quite basic sled, that helps me prevent tear out, due to the fact, that the CMS has no zero clearance plate insert.
I have tried to keep it as light weight as possible, to make it easy to take on and off, but in my next version, I will keep the right side straight, so I can get a full runner there on the underside.


The construction is quite simple, a base plate, two fences and a runner, that runs in the groove between the CMS and the long arm for the CMS sled, but it would be even more accurate, if it got a runner on the right side also, following the edge of the table, on this one, it just have a small one at the end of the pointed corner.
The runner is made from IKEA cutting board.


Always happy when I get to the shop and find a letter from my daughter.
She writes.
Hey, passed buy with a school friend on a walk, he is a huge fan. Kisses Mathilde.


Back to the sled, here on the table, with simple C-clamp fence stop and held with wing nuts.
The red half circles are just for safety, to remind me where the blade goes and keep my fingers on each side.


This is the thing we will be making, a mount that simply fits into the T-track on top of the CMS fence.


Let's make the fast mount.
A piece of wood, here plywood gets a rabbet, that correspond to the one on the fence.


Like so.


Hardwood cut to size, made to fit into the rabbet and deep enough, to get well into the T-track.


Make sure you get a tight fit.


Do you get the picture?


We have a mount.


The hardwood is a wee lover, so when it's mounted in the rabbet, it will not touch the bottom of the T-track.


Cut to length.


Using the sled - smiles.


Now the mount can be attached to the fence.


Just screws.


Here we have it in place.


Underside.


Finally in place.


Ready to cut some wood and to be taken on and off in a second, I can already see, that I use it more, due to the fact, that it's not a screw on unit now.
(I must be lazy…).

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or a sled, now winter is up…
(MaFe, you got such a terrible sense of humour).

Best thoughts,

MaFe
 

· Registered
Joined
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6,114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #42 ·
CMS cross cut sled fast mount, easy to use.

Festool CMS cross cut sled
fast mount, easy to use.

Here a little idea I got the other day, to make my latest cross cut sled for the Festool CMS table more easy to use. Normally it was screwed in place, with two wing nuts, to secure the sled to the fence, but it meant that I found it time consuming to take it on and off, what lead to often not using it…

So I came up with this little mount, that simply clicks in place and where I don't need to fine adjust the fence to fit to the screws.

I have not made a blog on the cross cut sled, as this is quite basic and you will be able to find plenty of build plans for that, but I will go through it.


Here the sled, mounted on the CMS table, before I made the new mount.
A quite basic sled, that helps me prevent tear out, due to the fact, that the CMS has no zero clearance plate insert.
I have tried to keep it as light weight as possible, to make it easy to take on and off, but in my next version, I will keep the right side straight, so I can get a full runner there on the underside.


The construction is quite simple, a base plate, two fences and a runner, that runs in the groove between the CMS and the long arm for the CMS sled, but it would be even more accurate, if it got a runner on the right side also, following the edge of the table, on this one, it just have a small one at the end of the pointed corner.
The runner is made from IKEA cutting board.


Always happy when I get to the shop and find a letter from my daughter.
She writes.
Hey, passed buy with a school friend on a walk, he is a huge fan. Kisses Mathilde.


Back to the sled, here on the table, with simple C-clamp fence stop and held with wing nuts.
The red half circles are just for safety, to remind me where the blade goes and keep my fingers on each side.


This is the thing we will be making, a mount that simply fits into the T-track on top of the CMS fence.


Let's make the fast mount.
A piece of wood, here plywood gets a rabbet, that correspond to the one on the fence.


Like so.


Hardwood cut to size, made to fit into the rabbet and deep enough, to get well into the T-track.


Make sure you get a tight fit.


Do you get the picture?


We have a mount.


The hardwood is a wee lover, so when it's mounted in the rabbet, it will not touch the bottom of the T-track.


Cut to length.


Using the sled - smiles.


Now the mount can be attached to the fence.


Just screws.


Here we have it in place.


Underside.


Finally in place.


Ready to cut some wood and to be taken on and off in a second, I can already see, that I use it more, due to the fact, that it's not a screw on unit now.
(I must be lazy…).

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or a sled, now winter is up…
(MaFe, you got such a terrible sense of humour).

Best thoughts,

MaFe
Hi guys,
Don't understand the picture thing…, it works perfect here in Edge. Firefox and on my Samsung mobile phone.
I have written to Cricket again, to see if LJ can fix the problem.
Never had a problem before, doing things the way I have always done.
Best thoughts,
Mads
 

· Registered
Joined
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6,114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #48 ·
CMS cross cut sled fast mount, easy to use.

Festool CMS cross cut sled
fast mount, easy to use.

Here a little idea I got the other day, to make my latest cross cut sled for the Festool CMS table more easy to use. Normally it was screwed in place, with two wing nuts, to secure the sled to the fence, but it meant that I found it time consuming to take it on and off, what lead to often not using it…

So I came up with this little mount, that simply clicks in place and where I don't need to fine adjust the fence to fit to the screws.

I have not made a blog on the cross cut sled, as this is quite basic and you will be able to find plenty of build plans for that, but I will go through it.


Here the sled, mounted on the CMS table, before I made the new mount.
A quite basic sled, that helps me prevent tear out, due to the fact, that the CMS has no zero clearance plate insert.
I have tried to keep it as light weight as possible, to make it easy to take on and off, but in my next version, I will keep the right side straight, so I can get a full runner there on the underside.


The construction is quite simple, a base plate, two fences and a runner, that runs in the groove between the CMS and the long arm for the CMS sled, but it would be even more accurate, if it got a runner on the right side also, following the edge of the table, on this one, it just have a small one at the end of the pointed corner.
The runner is made from IKEA cutting board.


Always happy when I get to the shop and find a letter from my daughter.
She writes.
Hey, passed buy with a school friend on a walk, he is a huge fan. Kisses Mathilde.


Back to the sled, here on the table, with simple C-clamp fence stop and held with wing nuts.
The red half circles are just for safety, to remind me where the blade goes and keep my fingers on each side.


This is the thing we will be making, a mount that simply fits into the T-track on top of the CMS fence.


Let's make the fast mount.
A piece of wood, here plywood gets a rabbet, that correspond to the one on the fence.


Like so.


Hardwood cut to size, made to fit into the rabbet and deep enough, to get well into the T-track.


Make sure you get a tight fit.


Do you get the picture?


We have a mount.


The hardwood is a wee lover, so when it's mounted in the rabbet, it will not touch the bottom of the T-track.


Cut to length.


Using the sled - smiles.


Now the mount can be attached to the fence.


Just screws.


Here we have it in place.


Underside.


Finally in place.


Ready to cut some wood and to be taken on and off in a second, I can already see, that I use it more, due to the fact, that it's not a screw on unit now.
(I must be lazy…).

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or a sled, now winter is up…
(MaFe, you got such a terrible sense of humour).

Best thoughts,

MaFe
Yes image is perfect Cricket, I'm hungry now.
Smiles.
Can you guys who have problems viewing, see this picture of a cross cut sled here:
 

· Registered
Joined
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6,114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #49 ·
CMS cross cut sled fast mount, easy to use.

Festool CMS cross cut sled
fast mount, easy to use.

Here a little idea I got the other day, to make my latest cross cut sled for the Festool CMS table more easy to use. Normally it was screwed in place, with two wing nuts, to secure the sled to the fence, but it meant that I found it time consuming to take it on and off, what lead to often not using it…

So I came up with this little mount, that simply clicks in place and where I don't need to fine adjust the fence to fit to the screws.

I have not made a blog on the cross cut sled, as this is quite basic and you will be able to find plenty of build plans for that, but I will go through it.


Here the sled, mounted on the CMS table, before I made the new mount.
A quite basic sled, that helps me prevent tear out, due to the fact, that the CMS has no zero clearance plate insert.
I have tried to keep it as light weight as possible, to make it easy to take on and off, but in my next version, I will keep the right side straight, so I can get a full runner there on the underside.


The construction is quite simple, a base plate, two fences and a runner, that runs in the groove between the CMS and the long arm for the CMS sled, but it would be even more accurate, if it got a runner on the right side also, following the edge of the table, on this one, it just have a small one at the end of the pointed corner.
The runner is made from IKEA cutting board.


Always happy when I get to the shop and find a letter from my daughter.
She writes.
Hey, passed buy with a school friend on a walk, he is a huge fan. Kisses Mathilde.


Back to the sled, here on the table, with simple C-clamp fence stop and held with wing nuts.
The red half circles are just for safety, to remind me where the blade goes and keep my fingers on each side.


This is the thing we will be making, a mount that simply fits into the T-track on top of the CMS fence.


Let's make the fast mount.
A piece of wood, here plywood gets a rabbet, that correspond to the one on the fence.


Like so.


Hardwood cut to size, made to fit into the rabbet and deep enough, to get well into the T-track.


Make sure you get a tight fit.


Do you get the picture?


We have a mount.


The hardwood is a wee lover, so when it's mounted in the rabbet, it will not touch the bottom of the T-track.


Cut to length.


Using the sled - smiles.


Now the mount can be attached to the fence.


Just screws.


Here we have it in place.


Underside.


Finally in place.


Ready to cut some wood and to be taken on and off in a second, I can already see, that I use it more, due to the fact, that it's not a screw on unit now.
(I must be lazy…).

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or a sled, now winter is up…
(MaFe, you got such a terrible sense of humour).

Best thoughts,

MaFe
Do you see a workmate here if you don't see the others:
 

· Registered
Joined
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6,114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #50 ·
CMS cross cut sled fast mount, easy to use.

Festool CMS cross cut sled
fast mount, easy to use.

Here a little idea I got the other day, to make my latest cross cut sled for the Festool CMS table more easy to use. Normally it was screwed in place, with two wing nuts, to secure the sled to the fence, but it meant that I found it time consuming to take it on and off, what lead to often not using it…

So I came up with this little mount, that simply clicks in place and where I don't need to fine adjust the fence to fit to the screws.

I have not made a blog on the cross cut sled, as this is quite basic and you will be able to find plenty of build plans for that, but I will go through it.


Here the sled, mounted on the CMS table, before I made the new mount.
A quite basic sled, that helps me prevent tear out, due to the fact, that the CMS has no zero clearance plate insert.
I have tried to keep it as light weight as possible, to make it easy to take on and off, but in my next version, I will keep the right side straight, so I can get a full runner there on the underside.


The construction is quite simple, a base plate, two fences and a runner, that runs in the groove between the CMS and the long arm for the CMS sled, but it would be even more accurate, if it got a runner on the right side also, following the edge of the table, on this one, it just have a small one at the end of the pointed corner.
The runner is made from IKEA cutting board.


Always happy when I get to the shop and find a letter from my daughter.
She writes.
Hey, passed buy with a school friend on a walk, he is a huge fan. Kisses Mathilde.


Back to the sled, here on the table, with simple C-clamp fence stop and held with wing nuts.
The red half circles are just for safety, to remind me where the blade goes and keep my fingers on each side.


This is the thing we will be making, a mount that simply fits into the T-track on top of the CMS fence.


Let's make the fast mount.
A piece of wood, here plywood gets a rabbet, that correspond to the one on the fence.


Like so.


Hardwood cut to size, made to fit into the rabbet and deep enough, to get well into the T-track.


Make sure you get a tight fit.


Do you get the picture?


We have a mount.


The hardwood is a wee lover, so when it's mounted in the rabbet, it will not touch the bottom of the T-track.


Cut to length.


Using the sled - smiles.


Now the mount can be attached to the fence.


Just screws.


Here we have it in place.


Underside.


Finally in place.


Ready to cut some wood and to be taken on and off in a second, I can already see, that I use it more, due to the fact, that it's not a screw on unit now.
(I must be lazy…).

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or a sled, now winter is up…
(MaFe, you got such a terrible sense of humour).

Best thoughts,

MaFe
Cricket, I can see that my browser says it's a not safe connection, when I see my blog, where other blogs don't say that… So I can suspect, that it has something to do with the fact that I store my pictures in the cloud and put them as links, instead of uploading them. This has not been a problem before, so strange why it starts to do that.
Best thoughts,
Mads
 

· Registered
Joined
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6,114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #53 ·
CMS cross cut sled fast mount, easy to use.

Festool CMS cross cut sled
fast mount, easy to use.

Here a little idea I got the other day, to make my latest cross cut sled for the Festool CMS table more easy to use. Normally it was screwed in place, with two wing nuts, to secure the sled to the fence, but it meant that I found it time consuming to take it on and off, what lead to often not using it…

So I came up with this little mount, that simply clicks in place and where I don't need to fine adjust the fence to fit to the screws.

I have not made a blog on the cross cut sled, as this is quite basic and you will be able to find plenty of build plans for that, but I will go through it.


Here the sled, mounted on the CMS table, before I made the new mount.
A quite basic sled, that helps me prevent tear out, due to the fact, that the CMS has no zero clearance plate insert.
I have tried to keep it as light weight as possible, to make it easy to take on and off, but in my next version, I will keep the right side straight, so I can get a full runner there on the underside.


The construction is quite simple, a base plate, two fences and a runner, that runs in the groove between the CMS and the long arm for the CMS sled, but it would be even more accurate, if it got a runner on the right side also, following the edge of the table, on this one, it just have a small one at the end of the pointed corner.
The runner is made from IKEA cutting board.


Always happy when I get to the shop and find a letter from my daughter.
She writes.
Hey, passed buy with a school friend on a walk, he is a huge fan. Kisses Mathilde.


Back to the sled, here on the table, with simple C-clamp fence stop and held with wing nuts.
The red half circles are just for safety, to remind me where the blade goes and keep my fingers on each side.


This is the thing we will be making, a mount that simply fits into the T-track on top of the CMS fence.


Let's make the fast mount.
A piece of wood, here plywood gets a rabbet, that correspond to the one on the fence.


Like so.


Hardwood cut to size, made to fit into the rabbet and deep enough, to get well into the T-track.


Make sure you get a tight fit.


Do you get the picture?


We have a mount.


The hardwood is a wee lover, so when it's mounted in the rabbet, it will not touch the bottom of the T-track.


Cut to length.


Using the sled - smiles.


Now the mount can be attached to the fence.


Just screws.


Here we have it in place.


Underside.


Finally in place.


Ready to cut some wood and to be taken on and off in a second, I can already see, that I use it more, due to the fact, that it's not a screw on unit now.
(I must be lazy…).

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or a sled, now winter is up…
(MaFe, you got such a terrible sense of humour).

Best thoughts,

MaFe
Hi Jasper,
Du skriver fint Dansk. Smiles.
Congrats on the first post, proud it was for me.
Yes LJ is a wonderful place, where so much is shared, just out of kindness for others and I personally finds great joy in this and have learned a lot of my skills here.
Honestly I know little about internet and SSL/TLS encrypted source… but I will try and write the supplier I use, to see if they can make it secure, so everyone can see the pictures again. They put my stuff on a new server just recently, guess this must be where the troubles started… Thank you so much for trying to help, it is really kind of you, I were about to give up as my own and LJ's tech knolage seemed to do no good… I were actually thinking of starting my own site, now I can spend my time playing with wood.
I have several blogs I would like to post, so hope the problem gets solved.
Thank you a lot for those kind words, they really touched me deep.
Best of my thoughts and hopes for you,
Mads
 

· Registered
Joined
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6,114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #54 ·
Adaptor, for Makita 18V circular saw on Festool rails._

Rail / track saw adaptor, for circular saw
Makita DSS501 LXT 18 V with my Festool rails.

UPDATE, a new version with zero clearance can be found here: https://www.lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/131924

I simply love the little Makita 18V saw, it is a gem and a joy to work with.
But once in a while, I would have loved it was a rail saw, so I decided to make it into one, by making an adaptor.

This is not a full build, just an inspiration tour, for others to use.


The saw connected to the rail with new adaptor.
It runs on the back of the rail, so I don't use the zero clearence strip, as it is set for my Festool saws.
All it does is to keep the saw on track.


From the side.
No I don't saw into the table… Laugh.


This is my 18V Makita saw, this model don't have a track adaptor and only one slot for a fence.


First up is to make a slider for the rails.
I mark up the slots and make rabbets.


Like this.


Sliding on the track.


Next up, I just bend two metal brackets (IKEA closet left over).
In this end, to old the saw base into the fence.


In other end to be attached to the saws front, onto the knob for the side fence.


The cut outs on the rail adaptor is for the motor to be able to get fully down and in the back for the locking lever.


Underside.


Had to k´make an extender washer. Out of some tubing.


Here with side fence.


The extender.


Spring fits inside.


Screwed onto the adaptor.


Also made a little extra thingy.
This is a wing nut.

Underside a flat head bolt.


Bolt head.


Sticking up, so it can catch the track.


Like this.


When tightened loosely, it holds the saw on the track.


So you will be able to lift saw and track in one move.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or keep you on track…

Best thoughts,

MaFe
 

· Registered
Joined
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6,114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #55 ·
Adaptor, for Makita 18V circular saw on Festool rails._

Rail / track saw adaptor, for circular saw
Makita DSS501 LXT 18 V with my Festool rails.

UPDATE, a new version with zero clearance can be found here: https://www.lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/131924

I simply love the little Makita 18V saw, it is a gem and a joy to work with.
But once in a while, I would have loved it was a rail saw, so I decided to make it into one, by making an adaptor.

This is not a full build, just an inspiration tour, for others to use.


The saw connected to the rail with new adaptor.
It runs on the back of the rail, so I don't use the zero clearence strip, as it is set for my Festool saws.
All it does is to keep the saw on track.


From the side.
No I don't saw into the table… Laugh.


This is my 18V Makita saw, this model don't have a track adaptor and only one slot for a fence.


First up is to make a slider for the rails.
I mark up the slots and make rabbets.


Like this.


Sliding on the track.


Next up, I just bend two metal brackets (IKEA closet left over).
In this end, to old the saw base into the fence.


In other end to be attached to the saws front, onto the knob for the side fence.


The cut outs on the rail adaptor is for the motor to be able to get fully down and in the back for the locking lever.


Underside.


Had to k´make an extender washer. Out of some tubing.


Here with side fence.


The extender.


Spring fits inside.


Screwed onto the adaptor.


Also made a little extra thingy.
This is a wing nut.

Underside a flat head bolt.


Bolt head.


Sticking up, so it can catch the track.


Like this.


When tightened loosely, it holds the saw on the track.


So you will be able to lift saw and track in one move.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or keep you on track…

Best thoughts,

MaFe
Sorry if some of you can't see the pictures try different browser or allow non secure pictures.
I have asked my server provider, to look into it now.
Best thoughts,
Mads
 

· Registered
Joined
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6,114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #60 ·
Adaptor, for Makita 18V circular saw on Festool rails._

Rail / track saw adaptor, for circular saw
Makita DSS501 LXT 18 V with my Festool rails.

UPDATE, a new version with zero clearance can be found here: https://www.lumberjocks.com/mafe/blog/131924

I simply love the little Makita 18V saw, it is a gem and a joy to work with.
But once in a while, I would have loved it was a rail saw, so I decided to make it into one, by making an adaptor.

This is not a full build, just an inspiration tour, for others to use.


The saw connected to the rail with new adaptor.
It runs on the back of the rail, so I don't use the zero clearence strip, as it is set for my Festool saws.
All it does is to keep the saw on track.


From the side.
No I don't saw into the table… Laugh.


This is my 18V Makita saw, this model don't have a track adaptor and only one slot for a fence.


First up is to make a slider for the rails.
I mark up the slots and make rabbets.


Like this.


Sliding on the track.


Next up, I just bend two metal brackets (IKEA closet left over).
In this end, to old the saw base into the fence.


In other end to be attached to the saws front, onto the knob for the side fence.


The cut outs on the rail adaptor is for the motor to be able to get fully down and in the back for the locking lever.


Underside.


Had to k´make an extender washer. Out of some tubing.


Here with side fence.


The extender.


Spring fits inside.


Screwed onto the adaptor.


Also made a little extra thingy.
This is a wing nut.

Underside a flat head bolt.


Bolt head.


Sticking up, so it can catch the track.


Like this.


When tightened loosely, it holds the saw on the track.


So you will be able to lift saw and track in one move.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or keep you on track…

Best thoughts,

MaFe
Hi guys,
Lew, yes it's browser specific and seems to depend on if they allow my servers pictures, have written my host and awaits answers.
Dave, Yes my host need to make the connection to a specific encryption, I have asked for this.
Iceman, smiles, love that name, thanks.
doubleDD, You are right this is not complex at all, it can be made for any saw or tool and you could even make it for a T.track, if you don
t have a rail. Worth building if needed, I am sure I will enjoy it in my allotment house. Thanks.
Best thoughts and a smile,
Mads
 

· Registered
Joined
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6,114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #61 ·
Fence and rail dogs - updates to the workshop

Festool fence and rail dogs
updates to the workshop.

Let's just get started:


The postman brought me these wonderful aluminium things, all the way from UK.
(Once they are out of the EU, that kind of shopping will be over again).


I had decided to replace my home made fence dogs, made from steel pipe, with some new and fancy dogs.
Actually the old once worked fine, but they were so tight, that it was a struggle to get them out, when I needed that, also I just found the new dogs kind of sexy. Laughs.


Mounted on the fence.
Cool and functional.


For the rail dogs, they are just slipped in and tightened up, while placed in the holes.


Then the collars are set for desired cut hight when needed.
Only little problem is where do I put the hex key…


A piece of hardwood and two rare earth magnets, glued in with epoxy.


Sized to a perfect fit, in the rail.


The hex key shortened.


To fit inside the rail.


Ready to rock and cut.


Here a way to use it, some plywood are put on the table, against some fence dogs, to align it.


Rail with rail dogs are put in and now it's time to route a rabbet, saw or what ever one need, the holes give you a perfect 90 degrees.
(Hope you got the simple description).


Also made my self a small tray, to keep the most used dogs at hand.


The rest have a place in the small drawers.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or a happy wruuffff!

Best thoughts,

MaFe
 

· Registered
Joined
·
6,114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #65 ·
Fence and rail dogs - updates to the workshop

Festool fence and rail dogs
updates to the workshop.

Let's just get started:


The postman brought me these wonderful aluminium things, all the way from UK.
(Once they are out of the EU, that kind of shopping will be over again).


I had decided to replace my home made fence dogs, made from steel pipe, with some new and fancy dogs.
Actually the old once worked fine, but they were so tight, that it was a struggle to get them out, when I needed that, also I just found the new dogs kind of sexy. Laughs.


Mounted on the fence.
Cool and functional.


For the rail dogs, they are just slipped in and tightened up, while placed in the holes.


Then the collars are set for desired cut hight when needed.
Only little problem is where do I put the hex key…


A piece of hardwood and two rare earth magnets, glued in with epoxy.


Sized to a perfect fit, in the rail.


The hex key shortened.


To fit inside the rail.


Ready to rock and cut.


Here a way to use it, some plywood are put on the table, against some fence dogs, to align it.


Rail with rail dogs are put in and now it's time to route a rabbet, saw or what ever one need, the holes give you a perfect 90 degrees.
(Hope you got the simple description).


Also made my self a small tray, to keep the most used dogs at hand.


The rest have a place in the small drawers.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or a happy wruuffff!

Best thoughts,

MaFe
Hi there,
Dutchy, sorry, we are working on it, think the problem is found.
doubleDD, Laughs yes dam sexy! The dogs for the fence are called fence dogs, the system table is Festool MFT.
The dogs are all bought at https://benchdogs.co.uk/ the have loads of cool stuff, for the 20mm holes.
Smiles, yes there are a thing about me and food, beer, whiskey, snacks, tobacco and woman… Laugh. Happy it makes you hungry. I love to enjoy life.
Lew, I know from experience, that I would look for that allen wrench again and again, if I did not come up with an solution. Smiles. Yes the picture thing is really strange, sees like the browsers run on different sets of rules.
Best thoughts,
Mads
 

· Registered
Joined
·
6,114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #66 ·
Fence and rail dogs - updates to the workshop

Festool fence and rail dogs
updates to the workshop.

Let's just get started:


The postman brought me these wonderful aluminium things, all the way from UK.
(Once they are out of the EU, that kind of shopping will be over again).


I had decided to replace my home made fence dogs, made from steel pipe, with some new and fancy dogs.
Actually the old once worked fine, but they were so tight, that it was a struggle to get them out, when I needed that, also I just found the new dogs kind of sexy. Laughs.


Mounted on the fence.
Cool and functional.


For the rail dogs, they are just slipped in and tightened up, while placed in the holes.


Then the collars are set for desired cut hight when needed.
Only little problem is where do I put the hex key…


A piece of hardwood and two rare earth magnets, glued in with epoxy.


Sized to a perfect fit, in the rail.


The hex key shortened.


To fit inside the rail.


Ready to rock and cut.


Here a way to use it, some plywood are put on the table, against some fence dogs, to align it.


Rail with rail dogs are put in and now it's time to route a rabbet, saw or what ever one need, the holes give you a perfect 90 degrees.
(Hope you got the simple description).


Also made my self a small tray, to keep the most used dogs at hand.


The rest have a place in the small drawers.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or a happy wruuffff!

Best thoughts,

MaFe
Lew, can you try now? I have changed the file extensions to https instead of http, my host says that's what is needed…
Best thoughts,
Mads
 

· Registered
Joined
·
6,114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #67 ·
Rail square DIY - can be made for any rail

Festool / Makita rail square DIY
can be made for any rail.

When doing construction work, it's useful to be able to make fast straight board cuts in many situations, these cut's don't need to be furniture precise, but within a mm or so pr. Meter, is more than fine. This is where these rail squares are brilliant, no setup, just a pencil mark for the size and you can make a nice straight cut.
Decided I needed one of these for my allotment house and that it would be a fun project, to make a MaFe version.
This square can of course be made for any brand of rail, my rail saw is a Festool, but I also made a rail jig, for my Makita and even have both brands of routers, that run on the rails.


Here the finished project first, plywood rail square mounted on the rail and put up against a piece of MDF for cut.


The cut side.
Hope you get the idea.


Let's get to it!
I start by cutting a piece of quality plywood.
The size is the width of the inside of a Systainer, so it can be stored there and the hight, app half of that.

Marking where the T-slot is located.


Leaving a wee bit of the ply going passed the edge of the rail, on the cutting side.


A strip the width of the T-slot, is cut from old IKEA cutting board.
(It's not needed to be from IKEA).


Make sure it's a tight fit.


On the table saw, a rabbet is cut to fit the strip.
Go slow and sneak in on it.


Roger rabbet…


Forgot to take a picture, when I were screwing in, the strip, but it's just three small screws, with countersink in the strip.
Here I cut an angle, to the fence, that starts where the rail ends, it's not needed, I just found it nice looking and wanted to remove weight, when possible.


Testing it out.


Remember we kept this one a wee too wide, don't cut it yet.


As you can see the fence is not completely square, so that will need to be corrected.


But I want to finish the build first and once all is done, square it up.
Here you get the basic idea, now we need a way to secure the fence and a little helper, to keep it on the board.

The washer will keep it from tilting and then I need to figure out how to hold it in place… Hmmmmmmmmm…


Perhaps something like this.


Well that might work!


Not bad at all, this will be a hardware free solution, that I like.


Glue.


We got a sliding fixture.


Less is plenty, big smile.


The devil is in the detail.


This will work, the rail can slide in and out, but will be held secure in place.


More glue.


Gave it some brad nails, while it was on the rail.
Here you can see the fence.


Zoom.


Screws from the backside, to hold it firmly in place.


What a mess.


I decided to remove the centre screw and ad one on each side.


So I can drill a hole in the centre.


8mm straight in the middle.


There are cut out for a bolt, in the strip.
The bolt needs to be grinded a wee bit on each side, to fit in the T-track.

Now with cut out for bolt to ride in the T-track.


Bolt is put in place and fence is slided on.


Good size hand knob is screwed on to it, like this it will lock and secure the fence.


Back to the hold in place thingy…
A large washer.


Drilling a hole.


Marking position.


Screw with a locking washer is screwed in.


Like this it can be easy set aside, when not needed or transported.


It will prevent the rail from tipping and make it easy to align the board.


Backside.


This is not needed, but again I would like to remove some material, to make it lighter and to look cool.


Also ran it over with a router, just to remove the sharp edges.


The fence.


Top.


Sliding the rail on to it.


Tightening the hand knob.
Is it only me who thinks this fence says WHOOO?
It really made me laugh.


Once squared up, I put a carpenters square on it, and found out it was app 1mm out of square.


This was simply corrected by running it through the table saw.


Test cutting and cutting over the wee extra, sticking out of the fence.


And yes it works like a charm, dead square now and really easy to use.
Think it's going to be a winner, especially on the road.


Fits in a systainer.


But for now it will spend the winter on the workshop wall.

Well the fence story is not over, there will be another part or two, as I actually started out making one in acrylic / plexiglass / PMMA, before I made this one, but then got distracted into making this one, but that's another story.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or even a straight cut.

Best thoughts,

MaFe
 

· Registered
Joined
·
6,114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #71 ·
Rail square DIY - can be made for any rail

Festool / Makita rail square DIY
can be made for any rail.

When doing construction work, it's useful to be able to make fast straight board cuts in many situations, these cut's don't need to be furniture precise, but within a mm or so pr. Meter, is more than fine. This is where these rail squares are brilliant, no setup, just a pencil mark for the size and you can make a nice straight cut.
Decided I needed one of these for my allotment house and that it would be a fun project, to make a MaFe version.
This square can of course be made for any brand of rail, my rail saw is a Festool, but I also made a rail jig, for my Makita and even have both brands of routers, that run on the rails.


Here the finished project first, plywood rail square mounted on the rail and put up against a piece of MDF for cut.


The cut side.
Hope you get the idea.


Let's get to it!
I start by cutting a piece of quality plywood.
The size is the width of the inside of a Systainer, so it can be stored there and the hight, app half of that.

Marking where the T-slot is located.


Leaving a wee bit of the ply going passed the edge of the rail, on the cutting side.


A strip the width of the T-slot, is cut from old IKEA cutting board.
(It's not needed to be from IKEA).


Make sure it's a tight fit.


On the table saw, a rabbet is cut to fit the strip.
Go slow and sneak in on it.


Roger rabbet…


Forgot to take a picture, when I were screwing in, the strip, but it's just three small screws, with countersink in the strip.
Here I cut an angle, to the fence, that starts where the rail ends, it's not needed, I just found it nice looking and wanted to remove weight, when possible.


Testing it out.


Remember we kept this one a wee too wide, don't cut it yet.


As you can see the fence is not completely square, so that will need to be corrected.


But I want to finish the build first and once all is done, square it up.
Here you get the basic idea, now we need a way to secure the fence and a little helper, to keep it on the board.

The washer will keep it from tilting and then I need to figure out how to hold it in place… Hmmmmmmmmm…


Perhaps something like this.


Well that might work!


Not bad at all, this will be a hardware free solution, that I like.


Glue.


We got a sliding fixture.


Less is plenty, big smile.


The devil is in the detail.


This will work, the rail can slide in and out, but will be held secure in place.


More glue.


Gave it some brad nails, while it was on the rail.
Here you can see the fence.


Zoom.


Screws from the backside, to hold it firmly in place.


What a mess.


I decided to remove the centre screw and ad one on each side.


So I can drill a hole in the centre.


8mm straight in the middle.


There are cut out for a bolt, in the strip.
The bolt needs to be grinded a wee bit on each side, to fit in the T-track.

Now with cut out for bolt to ride in the T-track.


Bolt is put in place and fence is slided on.


Good size hand knob is screwed on to it, like this it will lock and secure the fence.


Back to the hold in place thingy…
A large washer.


Drilling a hole.


Marking position.


Screw with a locking washer is screwed in.


Like this it can be easy set aside, when not needed or transported.


It will prevent the rail from tipping and make it easy to align the board.


Backside.


This is not needed, but again I would like to remove some material, to make it lighter and to look cool.


Also ran it over with a router, just to remove the sharp edges.


The fence.


Top.


Sliding the rail on to it.


Tightening the hand knob.
Is it only me who thinks this fence says WHOOO?
It really made me laugh.


Once squared up, I put a carpenters square on it, and found out it was app 1mm out of square.


This was simply corrected by running it through the table saw.


Test cutting and cutting over the wee extra, sticking out of the fence.


And yes it works like a charm, dead square now and really easy to use.
Think it's going to be a winner, especially on the road.


Fits in a systainer.


But for now it will spend the winter on the workshop wall.

Well the fence story is not over, there will be another part or two, as I actually started out making one in acrylic / plexiglass / PMMA, before I made this one, but then got distracted into making this one, but that's another story.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or even a straight cut.

Best thoughts,

MaFe
Hi there,
Lew, smiles, yes less is more at times. Smiles, a big one.
Pottz, So happy if this is the case, look forward to see your go on it. Thanks.
Dave, Yes this is the Ohhhhhhhh fence, the Ohhhh happy dancing monkey fence… Laughs, thanks.
Best thoughts and thanks for leaving a word,
Mads
 

· Registered
Joined
·
6,114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #74 ·
Rail square DIY - can be made for any rail

Festool / Makita rail square DIY
can be made for any rail.

When doing construction work, it's useful to be able to make fast straight board cuts in many situations, these cut's don't need to be furniture precise, but within a mm or so pr. Meter, is more than fine. This is where these rail squares are brilliant, no setup, just a pencil mark for the size and you can make a nice straight cut.
Decided I needed one of these for my allotment house and that it would be a fun project, to make a MaFe version.
This square can of course be made for any brand of rail, my rail saw is a Festool, but I also made a rail jig, for my Makita and even have both brands of routers, that run on the rails.


Here the finished project first, plywood rail square mounted on the rail and put up against a piece of MDF for cut.


The cut side.
Hope you get the idea.


Let's get to it!
I start by cutting a piece of quality plywood.
The size is the width of the inside of a Systainer, so it can be stored there and the hight, app half of that.

Marking where the T-slot is located.


Leaving a wee bit of the ply going passed the edge of the rail, on the cutting side.


A strip the width of the T-slot, is cut from old IKEA cutting board.
(It's not needed to be from IKEA).


Make sure it's a tight fit.


On the table saw, a rabbet is cut to fit the strip.
Go slow and sneak in on it.


Roger rabbet…


Forgot to take a picture, when I were screwing in, the strip, but it's just three small screws, with countersink in the strip.
Here I cut an angle, to the fence, that starts where the rail ends, it's not needed, I just found it nice looking and wanted to remove weight, when possible.


Testing it out.


Remember we kept this one a wee too wide, don't cut it yet.


As you can see the fence is not completely square, so that will need to be corrected.


But I want to finish the build first and once all is done, square it up.
Here you get the basic idea, now we need a way to secure the fence and a little helper, to keep it on the board.

The washer will keep it from tilting and then I need to figure out how to hold it in place… Hmmmmmmmmm…


Perhaps something like this.


Well that might work!


Not bad at all, this will be a hardware free solution, that I like.


Glue.


We got a sliding fixture.


Less is plenty, big smile.


The devil is in the detail.


This will work, the rail can slide in and out, but will be held secure in place.


More glue.


Gave it some brad nails, while it was on the rail.
Here you can see the fence.


Zoom.


Screws from the backside, to hold it firmly in place.


What a mess.


I decided to remove the centre screw and ad one on each side.


So I can drill a hole in the centre.


8mm straight in the middle.


There are cut out for a bolt, in the strip.
The bolt needs to be grinded a wee bit on each side, to fit in the T-track.

Now with cut out for bolt to ride in the T-track.


Bolt is put in place and fence is slided on.


Good size hand knob is screwed on to it, like this it will lock and secure the fence.


Back to the hold in place thingy…
A large washer.


Drilling a hole.


Marking position.


Screw with a locking washer is screwed in.


Like this it can be easy set aside, when not needed or transported.


It will prevent the rail from tipping and make it easy to align the board.


Backside.


This is not needed, but again I would like to remove some material, to make it lighter and to look cool.


Also ran it over with a router, just to remove the sharp edges.


The fence.


Top.


Sliding the rail on to it.


Tightening the hand knob.
Is it only me who thinks this fence says WHOOO?
It really made me laugh.


Once squared up, I put a carpenters square on it, and found out it was app 1mm out of square.


This was simply corrected by running it through the table saw.


Test cutting and cutting over the wee extra, sticking out of the fence.


And yes it works like a charm, dead square now and really easy to use.
Think it's going to be a winner, especially on the road.


Fits in a systainer.


But for now it will spend the winter on the workshop wall.

Well the fence story is not over, there will be another part or two, as I actually started out making one in acrylic / plexiglass / PMMA, before I made this one, but then got distracted into making this one, but that's another story.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or even a straight cut.

Best thoughts,

MaFe
Hi guys,

Andybb, +1 big smile here. Lovely word for a blog 'rodmap'.

MikeJT, Thanks, always happy to share the journey.

Best thoughts,
Mads
 

· Registered
Joined
·
6,114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #76 ·
Rail square DIY - can be made for any rail

Festool / Makita rail square DIY
can be made for any rail.

When doing construction work, it's useful to be able to make fast straight board cuts in many situations, these cut's don't need to be furniture precise, but within a mm or so pr. Meter, is more than fine. This is where these rail squares are brilliant, no setup, just a pencil mark for the size and you can make a nice straight cut.
Decided I needed one of these for my allotment house and that it would be a fun project, to make a MaFe version.
This square can of course be made for any brand of rail, my rail saw is a Festool, but I also made a rail jig, for my Makita and even have both brands of routers, that run on the rails.


Here the finished project first, plywood rail square mounted on the rail and put up against a piece of MDF for cut.


The cut side.
Hope you get the idea.


Let's get to it!
I start by cutting a piece of quality plywood.
The size is the width of the inside of a Systainer, so it can be stored there and the hight, app half of that.

Marking where the T-slot is located.


Leaving a wee bit of the ply going passed the edge of the rail, on the cutting side.


A strip the width of the T-slot, is cut from old IKEA cutting board.
(It's not needed to be from IKEA).


Make sure it's a tight fit.


On the table saw, a rabbet is cut to fit the strip.
Go slow and sneak in on it.


Roger rabbet…


Forgot to take a picture, when I were screwing in, the strip, but it's just three small screws, with countersink in the strip.
Here I cut an angle, to the fence, that starts where the rail ends, it's not needed, I just found it nice looking and wanted to remove weight, when possible.


Testing it out.


Remember we kept this one a wee too wide, don't cut it yet.


As you can see the fence is not completely square, so that will need to be corrected.


But I want to finish the build first and once all is done, square it up.
Here you get the basic idea, now we need a way to secure the fence and a little helper, to keep it on the board.

The washer will keep it from tilting and then I need to figure out how to hold it in place… Hmmmmmmmmm…


Perhaps something like this.


Well that might work!


Not bad at all, this will be a hardware free solution, that I like.


Glue.


We got a sliding fixture.


Less is plenty, big smile.


The devil is in the detail.


This will work, the rail can slide in and out, but will be held secure in place.


More glue.


Gave it some brad nails, while it was on the rail.
Here you can see the fence.


Zoom.


Screws from the backside, to hold it firmly in place.


What a mess.


I decided to remove the centre screw and ad one on each side.


So I can drill a hole in the centre.


8mm straight in the middle.


There are cut out for a bolt, in the strip.
The bolt needs to be grinded a wee bit on each side, to fit in the T-track.

Now with cut out for bolt to ride in the T-track.


Bolt is put in place and fence is slided on.


Good size hand knob is screwed on to it, like this it will lock and secure the fence.


Back to the hold in place thingy…
A large washer.


Drilling a hole.


Marking position.


Screw with a locking washer is screwed in.


Like this it can be easy set aside, when not needed or transported.


It will prevent the rail from tipping and make it easy to align the board.


Backside.


This is not needed, but again I would like to remove some material, to make it lighter and to look cool.


Also ran it over with a router, just to remove the sharp edges.


The fence.


Top.


Sliding the rail on to it.


Tightening the hand knob.
Is it only me who thinks this fence says WHOOO?
It really made me laugh.


Once squared up, I put a carpenters square on it, and found out it was app 1mm out of square.


This was simply corrected by running it through the table saw.


Test cutting and cutting over the wee extra, sticking out of the fence.


And yes it works like a charm, dead square now and really easy to use.
Think it's going to be a winner, especially on the road.


Fits in a systainer.


But for now it will spend the winter on the workshop wall.

Well the fence story is not over, there will be another part or two, as I actually started out making one in acrylic / plexiglass / PMMA, before I made this one, but then got distracted into making this one, but that's another story.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or even a straight cut.

Best thoughts,

MaFe
Hi Jack,
Laughs, this was the simple one, no one needs Festool, it's a luxury item, I have worked with Estonian woodworkers, that could make things of a unbelievable standard, with a dull chisel, a hammer and a rusty skill saw. It just makes it easier to be precise, when your tool is.
Yes that is a croquis / live drawing of mine, a discipline I have enjoyed a lot, as you learn to focus and feel a shape, as you have no time, to use your intellectual side.
Best thoughts thanks,
Mads
 

· Registered
Joined
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6,114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #77 ·
Simple speed square rail square - easy peasy

Simple speed square rail square
easy peasy.

A quick and clean, easy peasy, no nonsense rail square.
As I were looking for inspiration, for rail guides on the big www, I saw this clever version, believe it was at Festool owners group, but could not find it again - but thank you to the guy, who came up with this clever idea.
A short rail square is not as precise of course, but for a lot of construction work, it will be plenty and it can be made in a matter of minutes, all you need is a bolt, washer, star knob (wing nut) and a speed square.


That's it.
18,5 cm / 7 inch speed square mounted on the rail.
Almost too easy, laugh.


Here you see how it works.
Just push it up against the wood you want to cut.


A standard bolt, where two sides are grinded in, to fit the width of the T-track on the rail.
You can also buy a special made bolt.


Just like this.


No drilling needed, just use the angle slot.


Smiles.


Slide it on to the rail, push the square lip hard against the rail edge and tighten the knob.


Work.
I told you it was easy.
You can see the acrylic version, I were working on, on the table, that was what set it all off, this will be next part of the blog.

Hope it can be to some inspiration, or even straight cuts.

Best thoughts,

MaFe
 
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