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Festool domino overlap

881 Views 12 Replies 6 Participants Last post by  JackDuren
Does anyone who has a festool Domino know if the mortises can be overlapped in thickness/height? I understand that the width of the cut can easily be overlapped by sliding the tool left or right, but I'm wondering if the offset can also be changed so that the mortise and tendon is thicker, say 3/4 of an inch or some other custom number. Planning on cutting my own tenons to match.
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You may be better off using multiple dominoes instead. You aren't going to gain much by making a thicker tenon because you are still limited by the cutter depth. Using multiple dominos and referencing from opposite sides would certainly by a lot easier. Even if you were able to stack the mortises you would still have to clean out the sides (ends of the cuts). I assume that you are using a DF500 and wish you had a DF700 XL? I have seen people do multiple mortise cuts side to side then use a traditional tenon.
Yes, but I still need to know if they can be enlarged like this. In particular I've made a couple of poor mortises by hand already, and I'd like to clean them up with a larger Domino
Yes, but I still need to know if they can be enlarged like this. In particular I ve made a couple of poor mortises by hand already, and I d like to clean them up with a larger Domino

- Mark Shultz
To a certain extent you can make a thicker mortise by adjusting the height of the fence. It also depends on the size of the bit you are using. Once you get beyond the limitations of the fence adjustment you flip the fence out of the way and free hand it but it you aren't happy with your results now, I doubt that you would be happy with free handing results. Do you have a Festool Domino? It's not the ideal tool for what you are trying to do. It has a fluted bit that spins and goes side to side at the same time. You feed the bit into the wood slowly to get a clean cut while maintaining control of the machine. A router and a template would probably do a much better job with less risk of making the situation worse. The DF500 can only cut 1-1/16" deep, the DF 700 can cut up to 2-3/4" deep.
so it sounds like you wanna take a precision tool and try and do something imprecision ? why ? and why make your own dominos ? to me it makes no sense. use the tool for what it's designed to do.or listen to what northwoodsman has said ? sounds like you wasted a lot of money on a tool that doesn't do what you want it to do ?
While I don't disagree with any of the above, I think it would work…within the limitations of the fence height adjustment. The ends of the mortise will likely not be perfect, the thickness/width should be consistent.
I was considering buying the 700. My sloppy mortises are a bit over 1/2" already, so was thinking multiple passes could do it. But it sounds like it would be like widening a drill hole with a regular drill bit.
Yes, but I still need to know if they can be enlarged like this. In particular I ve made a couple of poor mortises by hand already, and I d like to clean them up with a larger Domino

- Mark Shultz

To a certain extent you can make a thicker mortise by adjusting the height of the fence. It also depends on the size of the bit you are using. Once you get beyond the limitations of the fence adjustment you flip the fence out of the way and free hand it but it you aren t happy with your results now, I doubt that you would be happy with free handing results. Do you have a Festool Domino? It s not the ideal tool for what you are trying to do. It has a fluted bit that spins and goes side to side at the same time. You feed the bit into the wood slowly to get a clean cut while maintaining control of the machine. A router and a template would probably do a much better job with less risk of making the situation worse. The DF500 can only cut 1-1/16" deep, the DF 700 can cut up to 2-3/4" deep.

- northwoodsman
Mark, I have an idea that can save you a LOT of money since you don't already own a Domino. The Morty from Woodpeckers and a router, which you probably already have, should do the trick. I have a DF 500 and can't justify spending $1600 on a DF700 so I have considered this for the few times when I need a larger machine. I'm not affiliated with Woodpecker's in any way. I do think this would work great in your situation. I would get the one without the case for $440.

Morty

Sure you could build a jig but this is very versatile and is ready to go out of the box. Watch the video. Do you mind telling us approximately where you are located in the country? I have another option if you live close to me.
Mark, I have an idea that can save you a LOT of money since you don t already own a Domino. The Morty from Woodpeckers and a router, which you probably already have, should do the trick. I have a DF 500 and can t justify spending $1600 on a DF700 so I have considered this for the few times when I need a larger machine. I m not affiliated with Woodpecker s in any way. I do think this would work great in your situation. I would get the one without the case for $440.

Morty

Sure you could build a jig but this is very versatile and is ready to go out of the box. Watch the video. Do you mind telling us approximately where you are located in the country? I have another option if you live close to me.

- northwoodsman
thats a great jig for making tenons and very high quality.heck i may get one myself for the few times i need a larger tenon.i cant justify a 700 either.
This is for an exterior door, so the tenons are beefy and longer than that jig could help with. Looks good though.
You can get some fairly long router bits. I was looking for a specific bit yesterday and I found one at Rockler for extended depth applications. If you could get a good start on a clean mortise you should be able to finish it up with a sharp, high quality chisel. If you were starting from scratch a Domino DF 700 XL may be a good choice (it would be my 1st choice) but on top of the $1600 you would still need to purchase the cutter(s). The depth is limited as I mentioned above. It's a terrible investment in a tool if you are trying to fix a mortise, it's just not going to give you the results you desire. Making a template and using a plunge router will give you better results for a fraction of the cost.
You should Google the Morley Mortiser, or check out his article in Fine Woodworking. I think there have also been discussions on here about his jig. I've built one and it does a great job for a lot less than a Domino machine. I couldn't find a really long 10 mm bit (the Domino size I use the most) so I'm using a 3/8" router bit. Once I route with the 3/8" bit I slip a shim behind the work to shift it to cut off a little extra for the 10 mm Domino. It is really easy to realign the workpiece for the secondary cut after slipping the shim in. I can can create almost any width mortise with the right shim. The Mortiser also lets you set how long you want the mortise to be, so if you want to use 4 Dominos or your own tenon stock to create a long tenon, you just adjust your stops and make your cut.

I switched the original design to a 1/2" thick piece of ply for the "table" that moves back and forth to adjust where the mortise lands on the object being mortised as I needed the extra 1/4" to get full depth mortises with the 3/8" router bit I have. I find the 1/2" stock stiff enough for all operations, so I haven't put the 3/4" thick board back on the jig.

I've been working on some curved chair legs and I'm finding they are the biggest challenge for the Morley Mortiser. For a concave curve, I cannot always get the area to be mortised to touch the underside of the jig's table, resulting in a shallow mortise. I'm planning on making a narrow "table" so I can get more depth in the concave mortises. I'm also considering making my own Dominos in 3/8" stock so I don't have to rely on 10 mm Dominos. While I can shim out the workpiece to get the 10 mm dominos to fit and I can get the job done without 10 mm router bit with sufficient depth, the 10 mm Dominos add an extra step over having 3/8" tenon stock.

So save your $1000 plus for a nice jointer or planer and build yourself a Morley Mortiser, you'll be glad you did!
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Domino is a Domino and A M&T is a M&T. Domino is two connections and M&T is one. A Domino doubles up is how many? Lots of uses for a Domino,

Domino is about production and speed..
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