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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Update - Using router bits

Since the original EZ mitre blog there have been variations added. To formalise the adding of new and/or additional methods to the technique I will add updates for now and re-release the whole thing if I ever get time.

The main reason for this update is, as has often been asked, 'can this technique be done using a table mounted router and 'v' groove bit ?' Up until now I have been reticent to suggest this but I have just this week discovered router bits that are up to the task. They come from the Axminster 'Axcaliber' range, available from Axminster.co.uk. I'd be surprised if there are not suppliers of similar quality bits in the US.

I've experimented with both a 45° and 60° 'V' bit ( 1/4" ) from this range and can report total success. The bits are pin sharp at the tip, this being essential to produce a perfect mitred groove.

Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Art Hardwood


This shows the 45° bit with a test piece in Sycamore at the top, a setup cut in the middle and the 45° bit at the bottom.

I also tried their 60° bit

Table Wood Rectangle House Lamp


To that end I made up a test hexagonal box in MDF (above and below)

Rectangle Wood Plumbing fixture Household hardware Hardwood


The advantages of using a router over the tablesaw for this technique are twofold:

1. The setup for the cut is a good deal less fraught with the bit height being easy to adjust to just under the board depth. Both cuts are done at once so no resetting any fences, which could introduce errors in the cut.

2. The angles of the joints are precise and don't involve tilting any blades. I like to leave my tablesaw blade at 90° if I can, it saves resetting the thing halfway through a project.

Well this has made things a lot simpler. Which can only be a good thing.

Be seeing you.
 

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Update - Using router bits

Since the original EZ mitre blog there have been variations added. To formalise the adding of new and/or additional methods to the technique I will add updates for now and re-release the whole thing if I ever get time.

The main reason for this update is, as has often been asked, 'can this technique be done using a table mounted router and 'v' groove bit ?' Up until now I have been reticent to suggest this but I have just this week discovered router bits that are up to the task. They come from the Axminster 'Axcaliber' range, available from Axminster.co.uk. I'd be surprised if there are not suppliers of similar quality bits in the US.

I've experimented with both a 45° and 60° 'V' bit ( 1/4" ) from this range and can report total success. The bits are pin sharp at the tip, this being essential to produce a perfect mitred groove.

Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Art Hardwood


This shows the 45° bit with a test piece in Sycamore at the top, a setup cut in the middle and the 45° bit at the bottom.

I also tried their 60° bit

Table Wood Rectangle House Lamp


To that end I made up a test hexagonal box in MDF (above and below)

Rectangle Wood Plumbing fixture Household hardware Hardwood


The advantages of using a router over the tablesaw for this technique are twofold:

1. The setup for the cut is a good deal less fraught with the bit height being easy to adjust to just under the board depth. Both cuts are done at once so no resetting any fences, which could introduce errors in the cut.

2. The angles of the joints are precise and don't involve tilting any blades. I like to leave my tablesaw blade at 90° if I can, it saves resetting the thing halfway through a project.

Well this has made things a lot simpler. Which can only be a good thing.

Be seeing you.
That is sweet Martyn.

I have played some with this technique, and it works on this side of the pond too. I have found that Whiteside bits have the sharpness and a pointy point too. What I have not tried is to route up through a board that has veneer on the top. I guess that results may vary, grain direction and all. Masking tape or a sacrificial scrap on top might help.

You could ask for a magnetic digital angle thingy (Wixey) for your next birthday. They really do a good job at easily setting a blade at the desired angle. Just food for thought. I love mine.

Steve
 

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Update - Using router bits

Since the original EZ mitre blog there have been variations added. To formalise the adding of new and/or additional methods to the technique I will add updates for now and re-release the whole thing if I ever get time.

The main reason for this update is, as has often been asked, 'can this technique be done using a table mounted router and 'v' groove bit ?' Up until now I have been reticent to suggest this but I have just this week discovered router bits that are up to the task. They come from the Axminster 'Axcaliber' range, available from Axminster.co.uk. I'd be surprised if there are not suppliers of similar quality bits in the US.

I've experimented with both a 45° and 60° 'V' bit ( 1/4" ) from this range and can report total success. The bits are pin sharp at the tip, this being essential to produce a perfect mitred groove.



This shows the 45° bit with a test piece in Sycamore at the top, a setup cut in the middle and the 45° bit at the bottom.

I also tried their 60° bit



To that end I made up a test hexagonal box in MDF (above and below)



The advantages of using a router over the tablesaw for this technique are twofold:

1. The setup for the cut is a good deal less fraught with the bit height being easy to adjust to just under the board depth. Both cuts are done at once so no resetting any fences, which could introduce errors in the cut.

2. The angles of the joints are precise and don't involve tilting any blades. I like to leave my tablesaw blade at 90° if I can, it saves resetting the thing halfway through a project.

Well this has made things a lot simpler. Which can only be a good thing.

Be seeing you.
That technique works down under too…
 

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Update - Using router bits

Since the original EZ mitre blog there have been variations added. To formalise the adding of new and/or additional methods to the technique I will add updates for now and re-release the whole thing if I ever get time.

The main reason for this update is, as has often been asked, 'can this technique be done using a table mounted router and 'v' groove bit ?' Up until now I have been reticent to suggest this but I have just this week discovered router bits that are up to the task. They come from the Axminster 'Axcaliber' range, available from Axminster.co.uk. I'd be surprised if there are not suppliers of similar quality bits in the US.

I've experimented with both a 45° and 60° 'V' bit ( 1/4" ) from this range and can report total success. The bits are pin sharp at the tip, this being essential to produce a perfect mitred groove.

Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Art Hardwood


This shows the 45° bit with a test piece in Sycamore at the top, a setup cut in the middle and the 45° bit at the bottom.

I also tried their 60° bit

Table Wood Rectangle House Lamp


To that end I made up a test hexagonal box in MDF (above and below)

Rectangle Wood Plumbing fixture Household hardware Hardwood


The advantages of using a router over the tablesaw for this technique are twofold:

1. The setup for the cut is a good deal less fraught with the bit height being easy to adjust to just under the board depth. Both cuts are done at once so no resetting any fences, which could introduce errors in the cut.

2. The angles of the joints are precise and don't involve tilting any blades. I like to leave my tablesaw blade at 90° if I can, it saves resetting the thing halfway through a project.

Well this has made things a lot simpler. Which can only be a good thing.

Be seeing you.
Thank you for sharing your wonderful tips! I have tried your E-Z Mitre method in only one project (just recently) and am looking forward to trying another beginning this week! YOU are an inspiration!
~Monkeyshines.
 

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Update - Using router bits

Since the original EZ mitre blog there have been variations added. To formalise the adding of new and/or additional methods to the technique I will add updates for now and re-release the whole thing if I ever get time.

The main reason for this update is, as has often been asked, 'can this technique be done using a table mounted router and 'v' groove bit ?' Up until now I have been reticent to suggest this but I have just this week discovered router bits that are up to the task. They come from the Axminster 'Axcaliber' range, available from Axminster.co.uk. I'd be surprised if there are not suppliers of similar quality bits in the US.

I've experimented with both a 45° and 60° 'V' bit ( 1/4" ) from this range and can report total success. The bits are pin sharp at the tip, this being essential to produce a perfect mitred groove.

Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Art Hardwood


This shows the 45° bit with a test piece in Sycamore at the top, a setup cut in the middle and the 45° bit at the bottom.

I also tried their 60° bit

Table Wood Rectangle House Lamp


To that end I made up a test hexagonal box in MDF (above and below)

Rectangle Wood Plumbing fixture Household hardware Hardwood


The advantages of using a router over the tablesaw for this technique are twofold:

1. The setup for the cut is a good deal less fraught with the bit height being easy to adjust to just under the board depth. Both cuts are done at once so no resetting any fences, which could introduce errors in the cut.

2. The angles of the joints are precise and don't involve tilting any blades. I like to leave my tablesaw blade at 90° if I can, it saves resetting the thing halfway through a project.

Well this has made things a lot simpler. Which can only be a good thing.

Be seeing you.
Thank you Martyn.

Tried this EZ miter on a router table a couple of times. I even dared using the table saw, but was difficult enough for me.

I used a 90° no brand bit. Glad of your found advantages on the bit.
 

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Update - Using router bits

Since the original EZ mitre blog there have been variations added. To formalise the adding of new and/or additional methods to the technique I will add updates for now and re-release the whole thing if I ever get time.

The main reason for this update is, as has often been asked, 'can this technique be done using a table mounted router and 'v' groove bit ?' Up until now I have been reticent to suggest this but I have just this week discovered router bits that are up to the task. They come from the Axminster 'Axcaliber' range, available from Axminster.co.uk. I'd be surprised if there are not suppliers of similar quality bits in the US.

I've experimented with both a 45° and 60° 'V' bit ( 1/4" ) from this range and can report total success. The bits are pin sharp at the tip, this being essential to produce a perfect mitred groove.

Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Art Hardwood


This shows the 45° bit with a test piece in Sycamore at the top, a setup cut in the middle and the 45° bit at the bottom.

I also tried their 60° bit

Table Wood Rectangle House Lamp


To that end I made up a test hexagonal box in MDF (above and below)

Rectangle Wood Plumbing fixture Household hardware Hardwood


The advantages of using a router over the tablesaw for this technique are twofold:

1. The setup for the cut is a good deal less fraught with the bit height being easy to adjust to just under the board depth. Both cuts are done at once so no resetting any fences, which could introduce errors in the cut.

2. The angles of the joints are precise and don't involve tilting any blades. I like to leave my tablesaw blade at 90° if I can, it saves resetting the thing halfway through a project.

Well this has made things a lot simpler. Which can only be a good thing.

Be seeing you.
Thanks for the explanation Martyn. Now there's yet another process for me to master. Looks good.
 

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Update - Using router bits

Since the original EZ mitre blog there have been variations added. To formalise the adding of new and/or additional methods to the technique I will add updates for now and re-release the whole thing if I ever get time.

The main reason for this update is, as has often been asked, 'can this technique be done using a table mounted router and 'v' groove bit ?' Up until now I have been reticent to suggest this but I have just this week discovered router bits that are up to the task. They come from the Axminster 'Axcaliber' range, available from Axminster.co.uk. I'd be surprised if there are not suppliers of similar quality bits in the US.

I've experimented with both a 45° and 60° 'V' bit ( 1/4" ) from this range and can report total success. The bits are pin sharp at the tip, this being essential to produce a perfect mitred groove.

Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Art Hardwood


This shows the 45° bit with a test piece in Sycamore at the top, a setup cut in the middle and the 45° bit at the bottom.

I also tried their 60° bit

Table Wood Rectangle House Lamp


To that end I made up a test hexagonal box in MDF (above and below)

Rectangle Wood Plumbing fixture Household hardware Hardwood


The advantages of using a router over the tablesaw for this technique are twofold:

1. The setup for the cut is a good deal less fraught with the bit height being easy to adjust to just under the board depth. Both cuts are done at once so no resetting any fences, which could introduce errors in the cut.

2. The angles of the joints are precise and don't involve tilting any blades. I like to leave my tablesaw blade at 90° if I can, it saves resetting the thing halfway through a project.

Well this has made things a lot simpler. Which can only be a good thing.

Be seeing you.
I was planning to make some boxes next week for B Day presents next week. I will b using the EZ miter to make it it easier. Thanx Martyn.
 

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Update - Using router bits

Since the original EZ mitre blog there have been variations added. To formalise the adding of new and/or additional methods to the technique I will add updates for now and re-release the whole thing if I ever get time.

The main reason for this update is, as has often been asked, 'can this technique be done using a table mounted router and 'v' groove bit ?' Up until now I have been reticent to suggest this but I have just this week discovered router bits that are up to the task. They come from the Axminster 'Axcaliber' range, available from Axminster.co.uk. I'd be surprised if there are not suppliers of similar quality bits in the US.

I've experimented with both a 45° and 60° 'V' bit ( 1/4" ) from this range and can report total success. The bits are pin sharp at the tip, this being essential to produce a perfect mitred groove.

Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Art Hardwood


This shows the 45° bit with a test piece in Sycamore at the top, a setup cut in the middle and the 45° bit at the bottom.

I also tried their 60° bit

Table Wood Rectangle House Lamp


To that end I made up a test hexagonal box in MDF (above and below)

Rectangle Wood Plumbing fixture Household hardware Hardwood


The advantages of using a router over the tablesaw for this technique are twofold:

1. The setup for the cut is a good deal less fraught with the bit height being easy to adjust to just under the board depth. Both cuts are done at once so no resetting any fences, which could introduce errors in the cut.

2. The angles of the joints are precise and don't involve tilting any blades. I like to leave my tablesaw blade at 90° if I can, it saves resetting the thing halfway through a project.

Well this has made things a lot simpler. Which can only be a good thing.

Be seeing you.
Martyn,

What a WONDERFUL technique you have developed!!

I prefer the Router Table method… just seems to be easier and more accurate for me.

Another tip worth mentioning here, that I have always used, is to always make the End Cross Cuts first followed by the With Grain Cuts… to cleanup any possible Tearout or rough edges of the Cross cuts.

Thank you so VERY MUCH for sharing this technique!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Update - Using router bits

Since the original EZ mitre blog there have been variations added. To formalise the adding of new and/or additional methods to the technique I will add updates for now and re-release the whole thing if I ever get time.

The main reason for this update is, as has often been asked, 'can this technique be done using a table mounted router and 'v' groove bit ?' Up until now I have been reticent to suggest this but I have just this week discovered router bits that are up to the task. They come from the Axminster 'Axcaliber' range, available from Axminster.co.uk. I'd be surprised if there are not suppliers of similar quality bits in the US.

I've experimented with both a 45° and 60° 'V' bit ( 1/4" ) from this range and can report total success. The bits are pin sharp at the tip, this being essential to produce a perfect mitred groove.

Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Art Hardwood


This shows the 45° bit with a test piece in Sycamore at the top, a setup cut in the middle and the 45° bit at the bottom.

I also tried their 60° bit

Table Wood Rectangle House Lamp


To that end I made up a test hexagonal box in MDF (above and below)

Rectangle Wood Plumbing fixture Household hardware Hardwood


The advantages of using a router over the tablesaw for this technique are twofold:

1. The setup for the cut is a good deal less fraught with the bit height being easy to adjust to just under the board depth. Both cuts are done at once so no resetting any fences, which could introduce errors in the cut.

2. The angles of the joints are precise and don't involve tilting any blades. I like to leave my tablesaw blade at 90° if I can, it saves resetting the thing halfway through a project.

Well this has made things a lot simpler. Which can only be a good thing.

Be seeing you.
Good point, Joe. Glad you like it.
 

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Update - Using router bits

Since the original EZ mitre blog there have been variations added. To formalise the adding of new and/or additional methods to the technique I will add updates for now and re-release the whole thing if I ever get time.

The main reason for this update is, as has often been asked, 'can this technique be done using a table mounted router and 'v' groove bit ?' Up until now I have been reticent to suggest this but I have just this week discovered router bits that are up to the task. They come from the Axminster 'Axcaliber' range, available from Axminster.co.uk. I'd be surprised if there are not suppliers of similar quality bits in the US.

I've experimented with both a 45° and 60° 'V' bit ( 1/4" ) from this range and can report total success. The bits are pin sharp at the tip, this being essential to produce a perfect mitred groove.

Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Art Hardwood


This shows the 45° bit with a test piece in Sycamore at the top, a setup cut in the middle and the 45° bit at the bottom.

I also tried their 60° bit

Table Wood Rectangle House Lamp


To that end I made up a test hexagonal box in MDF (above and below)

Rectangle Wood Plumbing fixture Household hardware Hardwood


The advantages of using a router over the tablesaw for this technique are twofold:

1. The setup for the cut is a good deal less fraught with the bit height being easy to adjust to just under the board depth. Both cuts are done at once so no resetting any fences, which could introduce errors in the cut.

2. The angles of the joints are precise and don't involve tilting any blades. I like to leave my tablesaw blade at 90° if I can, it saves resetting the thing halfway through a project.

Well this has made things a lot simpler. Which can only be a good thing.

Be seeing you.
Well, after using a flat topped mitre bit to make a tray for salt and pepper pots for the kitchen at our village hall, I obtained one of the Axcaliber 'pointy' bits from Axminster tools here in the UK. Despite being older and slower, I still have the impatience of youth, so to get started immediately I thought I would try to make a proper box using some 1/4 inch oak-veneered MDF left over from previous projects. I learned several lessons:

The starting piece of stock must be REALLY rectangular !

Veneered materials are perhaps NOT the best to use

I needed to be more careful in working out the location and size of the of the slot/rebate for the lipping.

I need thinner lipping for 1/4 inch board.

I need advice from Martyn (Brit Boxmaker) about cutting the top off - I did not get a perfectly level cut all round.

However, I have to say that the technique for creating boxes works fantastically well. Seeing the cutter make a ridge in the tape stuck on the top of the board was quite exciting! Even with my lack of experience, the final joints look super - I was amazed at what I achieved! I've never had joints that perfect.

I got a little break-out of the veneer when cutting the bottom slot, but its on the underneath of the box so luckily does not show to the casual observer (or in the picture below).

Because my lipping was too 'tall' for the lid, I had to gradually sand it down, but didn't go all the way, so that there is a 'line' visible - which I quite liked. Here is the box:

Rectangle Wood Wood stain Hardwood Table


Finished with three coats of Danish Oil and some Renaissance Wax, and not anywhere near Martyn's standard, but hopefully I'll get better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Update - Using router bits

Since the original EZ mitre blog there have been variations added. To formalise the adding of new and/or additional methods to the technique I will add updates for now and re-release the whole thing if I ever get time.

The main reason for this update is, as has often been asked, 'can this technique be done using a table mounted router and 'v' groove bit ?' Up until now I have been reticent to suggest this but I have just this week discovered router bits that are up to the task. They come from the Axminster 'Axcaliber' range, available from Axminster.co.uk. I'd be surprised if there are not suppliers of similar quality bits in the US.

I've experimented with both a 45° and 60° 'V' bit ( 1/4" ) from this range and can report total success. The bits are pin sharp at the tip, this being essential to produce a perfect mitred groove.

Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Art Hardwood


This shows the 45° bit with a test piece in Sycamore at the top, a setup cut in the middle and the 45° bit at the bottom.

I also tried their 60° bit

Table Wood Rectangle House Lamp


To that end I made up a test hexagonal box in MDF (above and below)

Rectangle Wood Plumbing fixture Household hardware Hardwood


The advantages of using a router over the tablesaw for this technique are twofold:

1. The setup for the cut is a good deal less fraught with the bit height being easy to adjust to just under the board depth. Both cuts are done at once so no resetting any fences, which could introduce errors in the cut.

2. The angles of the joints are precise and don't involve tilting any blades. I like to leave my tablesaw blade at 90° if I can, it saves resetting the thing halfway through a project.

Well this has made things a lot simpler. Which can only be a good thing.

Be seeing you.
I think you've done very well, Don. I'm glad you enjoyed yourself. Careful though, you might get hooked on this method. I have. I can sometimes feel the bit tickle my finger if I have one on the place it passes through. Minimal danger though as the rotational speed of the mitre bit's tip is not that high, plus its set not to come through the board anyway.

Regarding the separation cut. The fence needs to be exactly parallel to the table saw blade. You need to keep the top of the box tight to the saw fence throughout the cut. Use wedges the same thickness as your table saw blade width to keep the gap you've created from closing up as you cut around the box and/or set the saw blade height to cut just shy (0.5mm ish) of the box wall thickness all around and complete the separation with a knife. The latter also helps to keep a sharp corner on the inside of the box.
 

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Update - Using router bits

Since the original EZ mitre blog there have been variations added. To formalise the adding of new and/or additional methods to the technique I will add updates for now and re-release the whole thing if I ever get time.

The main reason for this update is, as has often been asked, 'can this technique be done using a table mounted router and 'v' groove bit ?' Up until now I have been reticent to suggest this but I have just this week discovered router bits that are up to the task. They come from the Axminster 'Axcaliber' range, available from Axminster.co.uk. I'd be surprised if there are not suppliers of similar quality bits in the US.

I've experimented with both a 45° and 60° 'V' bit ( 1/4" ) from this range and can report total success. The bits are pin sharp at the tip, this being essential to produce a perfect mitred groove.

Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Art Hardwood


This shows the 45° bit with a test piece in Sycamore at the top, a setup cut in the middle and the 45° bit at the bottom.

I also tried their 60° bit

Table Wood Rectangle House Lamp


To that end I made up a test hexagonal box in MDF (above and below)

Rectangle Wood Plumbing fixture Household hardware Hardwood


The advantages of using a router over the tablesaw for this technique are twofold:

1. The setup for the cut is a good deal less fraught with the bit height being easy to adjust to just under the board depth. Both cuts are done at once so no resetting any fences, which could introduce errors in the cut.

2. The angles of the joints are precise and don't involve tilting any blades. I like to leave my tablesaw blade at 90° if I can, it saves resetting the thing halfway through a project.

Well this has made things a lot simpler. Which can only be a good thing.

Be seeing you.
Hi,
Can someone give me the exact specs of the Whiteside bit?
I need 1/2 shank.
- What is the angle?
- What is the diameter?

Thanks all!!
 

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Update - Using router bits

Since the original EZ mitre blog there have been variations added. To formalise the adding of new and/or additional methods to the technique I will add updates for now and re-release the whole thing if I ever get time.

The main reason for this update is, as has often been asked, 'can this technique be done using a table mounted router and 'v' groove bit ?' Up until now I have been reticent to suggest this but I have just this week discovered router bits that are up to the task. They come from the Axminster 'Axcaliber' range, available from Axminster.co.uk. I'd be surprised if there are not suppliers of similar quality bits in the US.

I've experimented with both a 45° and 60° 'V' bit ( 1/4" ) from this range and can report total success. The bits are pin sharp at the tip, this being essential to produce a perfect mitred groove.

Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Art Hardwood


This shows the 45° bit with a test piece in Sycamore at the top, a setup cut in the middle and the 45° bit at the bottom.

I also tried their 60° bit

Table Wood Rectangle House Lamp


To that end I made up a test hexagonal box in MDF (above and below)

Rectangle Wood Plumbing fixture Household hardware Hardwood


The advantages of using a router over the tablesaw for this technique are twofold:

1. The setup for the cut is a good deal less fraught with the bit height being easy to adjust to just under the board depth. Both cuts are done at once so no resetting any fences, which could introduce errors in the cut.

2. The angles of the joints are precise and don't involve tilting any blades. I like to leave my tablesaw blade at 90° if I can, it saves resetting the thing halfway through a project.

Well this has made things a lot simpler. Which can only be a good thing.

Be seeing you.
Martyn - Hello from Montréal - I am a huge fan of your work.
Thanks for sharing your work and ideas.
Much appreciated,
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Board holder for router mitring

I thought it might be a good idea to post the board holder that I use for safe and sure router easy mitring. This holder keeps your hands clear of the cutting operation (which should satisfy the safety minded amongst us) and applies uniform pressure to the cut over the width of the board.

Wood Flooring Floor Hardwood Wood stain


It's made from MDF and three wood screws. Top view

Rectangle Wood Floor Font Flooring


Bottom view (flipped horizontally

Rectangle Wood Grey Floor Flooring


The fences slide into the main board running in a dovetailed 3 mm routed groove in the main board.

Rectangle Wood Table Bench Flooring


The fence itself having the complimentary pattern routed into it's edges

Wood Hardwood Cuisine Wood stain Flooring


The rear fence is fixed (glued in, as it's not sacrificial) and the side fence can slide, making it re-useable in terms of stopping breakout from the pattern board being routed. The eagle eyed amongst you will see this one has already been used a few times. The fences are both 35 mm wide x 6 mm deep, overall.

Brown Rectangle Wood Beige Table


Table Wood Tile flooring Rectangle Floor


As you can see from it's use, both ends of the side fence are useable. Indeed the first time I tried it the side fence was pulled toward the router fence by the action of the bit as it went through as you can see by the slightly curved 'V' slots in the fence to the right hand side of the picture. This is why I added the screw on the top right, to fix the side fence position whilst the holder is being used. When you want to move it you just slacken off the screw, slide the fence and re-tighten the screw.

As for the size of the main board I made it the width of the smallest pattern board I would route + 55 mm wide by the same - 20 mm deep ( I like to see the pattern board edge run against the router fence in order to head off any potential problems during the cut).

You may want to route boards thicker than 3mm. To this end I made up some 12 mm fence boards at the same time as I made up the 6 mm ones. The idea here is that you saw the 12 mm thick material down to the required thickness to cover the depth of the board being routed.

Brown Theodolite Wood Floor Flooring


Be seeing you.
 

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Board holder for router mitring

I thought it might be a good idea to post the board holder that I use for safe and sure router easy mitring. This holder keeps your hands clear of the cutting operation (which should satisfy the safety minded amongst us) and applies uniform pressure to the cut over the width of the board.

Wood Flooring Floor Hardwood Wood stain


It's made from MDF and three wood screws. Top view

Rectangle Wood Floor Font Flooring


Bottom view (flipped horizontally

Rectangle Wood Grey Floor Flooring


The fences slide into the main board running in a dovetailed 3 mm routed groove in the main board.

Rectangle Wood Table Bench Flooring


The fence itself having the complimentary pattern routed into it's edges

Wood Hardwood Cuisine Wood stain Flooring


The rear fence is fixed (glued in, as it's not sacrificial) and the side fence can slide, making it re-useable in terms of stopping breakout from the pattern board being routed. The eagle eyed amongst you will see this one has already been used a few times. The fences are both 35 mm wide x 6 mm deep, overall.

Brown Rectangle Wood Beige Table


Table Wood Tile flooring Rectangle Floor


As you can see from it's use, both ends of the side fence are useable. Indeed the first time I tried it the side fence was pulled toward the router fence by the action of the bit as it went through as you can see by the slightly curved 'V' slots in the fence to the right hand side of the picture. This is why I added the screw on the top right, to fix the side fence position whilst the holder is being used. When you want to move it you just slacken off the screw, slide the fence and re-tighten the screw.

As for the size of the main board I made it the width of the smallest pattern board I would route + 55 mm wide by the same - 20 mm deep ( I like to see the pattern board edge run against the router fence in order to head off any potential problems during the cut).

You may want to route boards thicker than 3mm. To this end I made up some 12 mm fence boards at the same time as I made up the 6 mm ones. The idea here is that you saw the 12 mm thick material down to the required thickness to cover the depth of the board being routed.

Brown Theodolite Wood Floor Flooring


Be seeing you.
More good information Martyn. Thanks for sharing.
 

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Board holder for router mitring

I thought it might be a good idea to post the board holder that I use for safe and sure router easy mitring. This holder keeps your hands clear of the cutting operation (which should satisfy the safety minded amongst us) and applies uniform pressure to the cut over the width of the board.

Wood Flooring Floor Hardwood Wood stain


It's made from MDF and three wood screws. Top view

Rectangle Wood Floor Font Flooring


Bottom view (flipped horizontally

Rectangle Wood Grey Floor Flooring


The fences slide into the main board running in a dovetailed 3 mm routed groove in the main board.

Rectangle Wood Table Bench Flooring


The fence itself having the complimentary pattern routed into it's edges

Wood Hardwood Cuisine Wood stain Flooring


The rear fence is fixed (glued in, as it's not sacrificial) and the side fence can slide, making it re-useable in terms of stopping breakout from the pattern board being routed. The eagle eyed amongst you will see this one has already been used a few times. The fences are both 35 mm wide x 6 mm deep, overall.

Brown Rectangle Wood Beige Table


Table Wood Tile flooring Rectangle Floor


As you can see from it's use, both ends of the side fence are useable. Indeed the first time I tried it the side fence was pulled toward the router fence by the action of the bit as it went through as you can see by the slightly curved 'V' slots in the fence to the right hand side of the picture. This is why I added the screw on the top right, to fix the side fence position whilst the holder is being used. When you want to move it you just slacken off the screw, slide the fence and re-tighten the screw.

As for the size of the main board I made it the width of the smallest pattern board I would route + 55 mm wide by the same - 20 mm deep ( I like to see the pattern board edge run against the router fence in order to head off any potential problems during the cut).

You may want to route boards thicker than 3mm. To this end I made up some 12 mm fence boards at the same time as I made up the 6 mm ones. The idea here is that you saw the 12 mm thick material down to the required thickness to cover the depth of the board being routed.

Brown Theodolite Wood Floor Flooring


Be seeing you.
Great idea. Thanks.
 

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