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Henry Wood Detective Agency_Tuesday



The next day Henry arrived at his office bright and early. Francis wasn't in yet, as he preferred to roll out of bed at the crack of noon. It was quiet and Henry took out the pencil and a pad of paper. He looked at the pencil again and then used it to write down 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, and 23. He added the number s up and they equaled 41. Next he assigned each number a letter, a, b, c, e, g, y. Leaning back he pondered his first two attempts, scratched his head, and dismissed them.

Twenty minutes and three more dismissed theories later, the sound of heels on the hardwood hallway floor caught Henry's attention. He was a bit of an expert on the gait of people. He could tell when it was Francis, he could tell when Big Mike was coming, and he could tell that it was a woman who strode with confidence. The door opened. She stood there momentarily, as if to say, I am here, take me in, I am marvelous. Wearing a Dior dress she had a figure that made an hour glass self conscious and she knew it. She walked in and set her tiny purse on the corner of the desk and asked, "Are you Henry Wood?" in a voice that was dark and hypnotic.

With a nod Henry motioned to the chair. She sat down and crossed her legs. Boy could she cross a leg. Henry got up and checked the thermostat. "It seems you have me at a disadvantage?"

"I am Miss Culberson. I need your help and your discretion."

"What exactly do you need help with?"

"My father recently passed away…" she said with a pause for a respect full sigh.

"I am sorry" Henry said.

"It is ok, it has been a month now, I have grown accustom to the emptiness of the house. The reason I need your help, is that there are some issues with the estate."

"Issues?" Henry said with the voice he reserved for those occasions when he knew he was being fed a line, but didn't want the feeder to know. It was slightly lower with just a smidgeon of empathy.

"Mr. Wood, my father may have occasionally been creative with his books, but he was a good man. There is a man at the law firm we use, who seems to have it out for my father and now me."

"Which firm is that?"

"Smith, Havershome and Blickstein in town and the man is Mr. Alexander, I think he is an accountant or something." She said, with a casualness that was a bit too casual. Henry considered taking offense at her remark about Manhattan being 'in town', as if Brooklyn wasn't, but her legs were really well crossed.

"Why do you think he is out to get you?" Henry asked while trying not to look at her legs and intrigued that yet another person is looking for Mr. Alexander.

"He has been keeping a journal."

"An accounting journal, being kept by an accountant that seems pretty standard, wouldn't you say?" Henry said, hoping to pry something out of her.

"I believe he had found some irregularities in my father's books, some tiny little omissions, and he wants to ruin my father's good name and me in the process." She said with another, albeit sadder sigh. Apparently the thought of losing her inheritance was worse than losing her father.

"Why don't you just go to the partners and ask them to straighten him out? Surely they wouldn't want to lose you as a client." Henry asked, knowing that she would have a polished and prepared answer, but he liked to hear her talk.

"They don't know where he is. It seems he didn't show up for work yesterday. I need you to find him and get that Journal!" She said, this time, with an air of entitlement.

"What makes you think I can find him?"

"I have been told that you are looking for him already. I just ask that when you find him, you bring the journal to me. I will pay you five thousand dollars. Here is half now and half when you deliver." She said and stood, handing Henry a plain envelope, grabbed her purse and left.

Now he had one job, two clients, and six crazy numbers. The rest of the morning consisted of a trip to the diner for a cup of joe and lots of dead end ideas regarding the pencil clue. Shortly after noon, Francis was coming down the hall with his buddy Don, a photographer at the Brooklyn Daily News. Henry popped his head out and said, "Hello Gents, any good news today?"

"Is there ever?" scoffed Don. He spent most nights prowling the streets looking for seedy scoops. Francis just shrugged.
"Hey let me you ask you guys something?" Henry nodded towards his office.

"Sure Ace" what is it. Don called Henry and everyone else Ace. He was bad with names.

Francis, Don and Henry filed back into the office and Henry read off the numbers. Francis shrugged again. If he couldn't eat it, he just did care. Don said, "They are all prime numbers."

"I hadn't noticed that." Henry said, giving Don a nod of appreciation.

Don looked at the pencil and mused, "I wonder why there are 4 missing primes?"

The confused look on Henry's face, told Don he should elaborate. "11, 13, 17 and 19, are between 7 and 23."

"There are 4 missing numbers." Henry said out loud, but mostly to himself. "I wonder…" and his voice trailed off.

Don and Francis could tell that Henry's wheels were turning so they headed across the hall. Henry needed some wood time, so he grabbed his overcoat and hat and headed home.

When he got there the closet was empty, as it was most days. He took a piece of oak and rubbed his hand over it. What would this be good for? Henry thought to himself. He grabbed a ruler and a non-clue pencil and made some marks. The wheels were still turning.

The little piece of wood seemed to want to be turned into a tool holding device. Henry wanted to use the rare earth magnets he had bought some time ago, so he decided he would combine them with the oak and hang it on the wall. He carefully marked out the spots. He would use his Fostner bits, to drill out holes for the magnets. A quick practice hole in a piece of scrap and he was ready. The seven holes drilled out easily. Henry screwed in a magnet holder and was inches from plopping in a magnet when he realized that once it was in, he wouldn't be able to get it out. Those suckers really stick together and the screw would have been hidden under the magnet. It was almost a blunder, but his brain was thinking several steps ahead, just like Mr. Alexander seemed to be doing.



Henry sanded the board for an hour and now was considering if he should stain it. He had some General Finishes Georgian Cherry Gel Stain that had mysteriously appeared in the closet. He wasn't sure exactly how to use it, so he decided to think about it for a day or so.
Like a bolt of lightning out of a clear blue sky the number 17 jumped out at him. He felt like the fog was slowly clearing. He was suddenly overcome with hunger and set out to find some dinner.

He sat down at the kitchen table and pondered out loud, "Mr. Alexander knew I would go to his office. He knew I would notice the pencil. He is a cautious and meticulous man. He wouldn't just write down the clue. He would hide the clue." Henry was now convinced that the real clue was 11, 13, 17 and 19.
To be honest, i really want to focus on your woodworking content-but the story gets in the way for me. I am interested in your woodworking experience because we are both sort of beginners at that. I know I'm not your only reader so keep having fun, if you are (it looks like a lot of work!). I'm looking forward to seeing the results of your next efforts even if you just do experiments with new tools.

Best,
Bill
 

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To Build or Not To Build



A while back I talked about my desire to buy or build a router table. Today I have decided. I will build. It will be glorious. The factors that influenced my decision were many; quality, precision, flatness of the table, and to some extent cost. When I weighed all the factors the scales were greatly tilted in favor of buying either the Incra super system or the Veritas system. I choose to build, because I wanted to.

In a day or two, the router plate I ordered will arrive. This will cause much stress and fear, as I will likely need to drill some holes into it. It is possible that I will devote twenty to thirty hours measuring and remeasuring the placement of the holes, before I break down and call in someone from NASA. Since I don't have a drill press or know what type of bit to use, I calculate my chances for a cataclysmic failure to be at about 84%.
I began work on the stretchers. They are made from 2×4s. I have designed the table to have the same table top dimensions as the Kreg table, 24×32. When I say designed, I am using that term loosely, as I am actually just modifying the plans I used to build my work bench. Those plans were designed by the editor of Fine Woodworking magazine, Asa Christiana. My plans simply call for different dimensions, a set of freaking laser beams, and a Gatlin gun. It is actually going to be a router/urban assault table.

I am setting each leg in from the edge by 3 inches. The legs will be made from 4×4s. This means that the side stretchers will be 11 inches and the front and back will be at 19 inches. So I bought (2) 8 foot 2×4s and (2) 4×4. I also purchased 10 feet of 1×6 oak. It was pretty and I wanted it. I may use it as part of a fence or as a mount for the gun.

I was all set to cut my 8 stretchers when it occurred to me, that I should sand first. The voice in my head, with a thick German accent, said I was being 'Stupid'. I didn't listen to my inner German voice and I went ahead and started to sand. While I was sanding, I noticed several things. The first was that sanding one long piece was easier than sanding 4 little pieces. The second was that I didn't need to clamp and unclamp everything so often. Now admittedly, I would have used bench cookies were I sanding 11 inch pieces, to do the four inch faces, but still, it seemed more efficient. The third aspect that I really liked was that I didn't have to change the sand paper as often. I started with 50 grit on the belt sander. I then changed to 80, 150, and 220 on the mouse sander. I went through this cycle with each of the 4 sides. Obviously there would have been 4 times more grit changes, had I sanded each piece individually.



So that was all I did today, with regards to my woodworking. I sanded a 2×4. Not very dramatic or sexy, I will admit, but that is today's report. I feel I have let my reading public down. I have brought great shame to myself, my family, my ancestors, my sister's cat, and several neighbors here in Martelle. I can live with that.



On an entirely different note, today has been a banner day for the readership of the old blog. It is interesting that the eastern sea board, completely shut down by snowmageden, has had a fair number of people turning to my article on creating the cauls. The normal readership, which does not count the several hundred wonderful people which read the blog on Lumberjocks, is around 100, with the largest contingent being the 12 people from St. Louis who started reading a week or two ago. As of the writing of tonight's rambling, the number of people who stopped by to check out the blog was 261, with 77.78% being new visits. I don't know how many of those will return to see this post, but to those that do, I say, Thanks a bunch. I hope the snow melts for you quickly. And to the 12 from St. Louis I ask, do you know Eric Liu?

I look forward to learning of the escapades that are sure to ensue from building a router table! Don't forget about the electricity (for the laser beams, et. al.)!

Bravo
Bill from Indiana
 

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The Amazing Hand Saw



The world is a dangerous place. The opposing ideas cause our species to fight and squabble about almost anything. Every so often, those differences seem to disappear, and we cheer for the triumph of the athlete.

Today I did some woodworking, but I also watched the winter Olympics in Vancouver. I cheered for the USA. I watched the medal count and felt overwhelming pride with each Bronze, Silver and Gold. But I also cheer at the joy. The pure happiness displayed at a life's dream achieved. Much has been made of Canada never winning gold at any of the Olympics held on their own soil. The added pressure was evident when with only one skier to go, the Canada's Jennifer Heil, leading women's mogul event, had her dream, and that of an entire country, dashed. The tears streaking down her chin were heartbreaking. Today, Alexander Bilodeau put on his skis, trying to do what Jennifer Heil had almost done. Alexander Bilodeau won the gold medal in the men's moguls' event, and a nation cheered. I cheered too.

The dedication that each man and woman displays, the desire for greatness, is so apparent, is so beautiful, that for a couple of weeks we are inspired to try harder. With this in mind, I rethought how I would cut the 4×4s. I had planned on firing up the Bosch circular saw, as I was sure that they must be too big for the Japanese hand saw. As I looked at the wood, it's mass, so much greater than the normal 1 inch boards I work with, I had a thought it must be too big. The Japanese don't use power tools, so they must cut their 4×4's by hand. It must be possible. But is it incredibly hard, will I screw up my router table legs? In the spirit of the great Olympians fighting it out in Vancouver, I decided to go for it.



I marked each leg, just as I would for the circular saw, and then clamped the first one in my vice. I started the cut and with a handful of careful strokes, got the blade heading through the 4×4 on a straight path. To my surprise, the saw easily made the cut. It went so quickly and was so straight that I had to stop and take a picture. The picture set up took longer than it took to cut both the legs. It should be noted that I can't fit an eight foot 4×4 in my car, so I have the man at the lumber yard cut off a bit. I always make sure to know exactly how long I want my pieces before I go, so that the first two legs are done for me. Cutting the legs was fun. When I was finished, they were all the same length.

So I learned that my Japanese hand saws are even more capable than I had previously thought. The next step is to get them sanded up. The rest of the afternoon was spent sanding, watching the Olympics, and taking a Sunday afternoon nap. Not a bad day at all. I am still inspired.
The saw obviously provided a very nice cut. Just curious, how many 4 by 4s can a saw like that be expected to cut before it feels like it needs to be resharpened (and is that a big deal)?

Bill
 

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I Suck



On April 24, 1990 the Hubble Space telescope was launched into orbit aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery. The images they sent back were blurry. It was one of the darkest days in the space programs history. After polishing the primary mirror for a year they had screwed it up, worse than Billy Buckner in the sixth game of the 86' World Series. The mirror was off by 1/50th the width of a single human hair.

The holes, which I drilled in the legs for my router table, were off by more than the Hubble mirror. I am sure that the outrage among the scientific community will be less severe, though only slightly. I had the same problem with the workbench, though part of it was due to trying to measure and watch college football simultaneously, but the point is, I still drilled holes that were not true. I was careful in my markings; I was careful in drilling the holes and still just couldn't get it right.



It has been said that those who don't learn from history are doomed to repeat it. At the moment of realization that one has 'done it again', the five stages of woodworking begin. The woodworker will look at the pieces which don't fit together, take them apart, then immediately put them back together, hoping that this time it will work. This cycle will continue until a feeling of disgust and rage boil up from deep within our craftsman. Reaching towards the sky and screaming to the wood gods, "Why Me" will provide no comfort and the Anger will not subside until he or she starts to bargain with the wood pieces. "Please fit together. I promise that next time I will be more careful. Come on, just this once…" This reasoning will end in tears and a feeling of overwhelming depression, and finally acceptance. Once acceptance is reached, the woodworker will figure out a solution and ultimately triumph. I am not to acceptance.

I have come to the conclusion that much as I love my Japanese hand saw for cutting, I may need to make an upgrade from a hand drill to a drill press. The worst part is that after letting two woodworking ground balls travel through my legs, I am anxious to try again. So obviously I will need to build another bench of some sort. Of course next time, I will use a drill press to drill the holes.

If I were in acceptance I would write a good transition to this paragraph, but I am still too depressed so I will just carry on without any thought to the rhythm or style of this piece. Also, figure skating pisses me off! But I digress. This has really gotten under my skin, both the figure skating and the drilling debacle. I can tell that it has even affected my writing as this post is neither funny nor entertaining. In fact, I would say it is, sad, and boring. It is difficult to write when one is dealing with stage four of a woodworking funk. I wish I had a
cookie.

Since I don't have a cookie, I will ask for your help in reaching acceptance. To get there I think I need to have a solid plan for buying a drill press. So the question of the day, which I haven't asked in over a month, is this, what would you, the reader, recommend as a good quality drill press?

I have looked at the Delta DP 300L 12 Twin Laser Crosshair Drill Press and it seems good, but there are a lot of ones to choose from. Any help would be greatly appreicated.
If you don't want to use an alternative joinery technique, maybe you should just start anew? The wood is pretty cheap compared to the tools you are talking about, no? BTW, I have been looking at the Delta 959L drill press. It doesn't look as nice as the Powermatic mentioned above, but it achieves 200 RPM on the low end instead of 400, in case you might like to drill metal. It also has a very nice table and it can be had for $579.

In the same vein as you, I have designed a planer/grinder table I am going to build (featuring a planed top) before I attempt my workbench project. I want to practice glueing and planing a 24" table flat before I try a 7' table. I'll keep buying wood until I get it right! ; )

Good luck (and have fun)!
Bill
 

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Her Name is Angie



The response to yesterday's blog, "I Suck", was tremendous. The number of views went way up. I can only assume that there were a great number of people who agree whole heartedly, and likely have had this opinion for some time. When they saw the title, they were eager to revel in my realization, of that which they had always known. The comments were wonderful. I responded to a number of them and I looked up a lot of the products that people suggested. I am much smarter today. Thanks everyone.

I love math. I love the precision. I know that if I measure an identical distance on two pieces of wood, that given a slope of zero, when I drill, the holes will line up. It is simple math. I feel that it is important to show what happens when you drill one hole with a positive slope and one with a negative slope. As you can see it is not even close. This concludes my complaining about yesterday's misadventures, and now on to your regularly scheduled blog.



Social media is a wonderful thing. It allows us to meet new people, find wonderful blogs, join groups that are made up of people who share similar interests. Social media also allows one to be found. Yesterday I was found by a ghost from my past.

In the year nineteen hundred and eighty-five there was a girl; a young woman really, with curly blonde hair, an encyclopedic knowledge of sports, and gift for trash talking. I thought she was the cat's meow, and you know how I feel about cats. Admittedly, the saying, 'The Cat's Meow', had gone out of fashion in the late 20's, but I enjoy going 'old school', now and again. I digress.

She didn't think I was the cat's anything, but I was determined. I imagined that I would win her heart in a week or two, much like I imagined that when the holes were drilled in the router table legs, I would only have to tweak one or two of the sixteen. Angie was not so cooperative and fancied another boy. Of the sixteen holes, fourteen of them were hideously wrong.

After a couple of months of me not getting the hint; she just gave up and decided to go out with me. I still remember the first time I took her home to meet the parents. My father and Angie got into a serious sports conversation. I love sports, but Angie, was the 'Son' my father never had. I digress again. The point is that I wore her down, and I used this same determination today, to whip the legs into shape. The holes now line up. I am thrilled.

Another lesson was learned today. After an evening of sleep, the disasters of the day before, in the light of a new day, are merely opportunities to practice using my rasp. I enjoyed my woodworking today, and the time spent waxing nostalgic about freshman year.
Tracy and Teri, and now Angie, are good for the blog…keep them in! : )
Amazing how the friends we made "way back then" remain in our minds.
I'm about 4 years older than you I think, so my "way back then" is about the same as yours.
Fond memories.

Bill
 

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Her Name is Angie



The response to yesterday's blog, "I Suck", was tremendous. The number of views went way up. I can only assume that there were a great number of people who agree whole heartedly, and likely have had this opinion for some time. When they saw the title, they were eager to revel in my realization, of that which they had always known. The comments were wonderful. I responded to a number of them and I looked up a lot of the products that people suggested. I am much smarter today. Thanks everyone.

I love math. I love the precision. I know that if I measure an identical distance on two pieces of wood, that given a slope of zero, when I drill, the holes will line up. It is simple math. I feel that it is important to show what happens when you drill one hole with a positive slope and one with a negative slope. As you can see it is not even close. This concludes my complaining about yesterday's misadventures, and now on to your regularly scheduled blog.



Social media is a wonderful thing. It allows us to meet new people, find wonderful blogs, join groups that are made up of people who share similar interests. Social media also allows one to be found. Yesterday I was found by a ghost from my past.

In the year nineteen hundred and eighty-five there was a girl; a young woman really, with curly blonde hair, an encyclopedic knowledge of sports, and gift for trash talking. I thought she was the cat's meow, and you know how I feel about cats. Admittedly, the saying, 'The Cat's Meow', had gone out of fashion in the late 20's, but I enjoy going 'old school', now and again. I digress.

She didn't think I was the cat's anything, but I was determined. I imagined that I would win her heart in a week or two, much like I imagined that when the holes were drilled in the router table legs, I would only have to tweak one or two of the sixteen. Angie was not so cooperative and fancied another boy. Of the sixteen holes, fourteen of them were hideously wrong.

After a couple of months of me not getting the hint; she just gave up and decided to go out with me. I still remember the first time I took her home to meet the parents. My father and Angie got into a serious sports conversation. I love sports, but Angie, was the 'Son' my father never had. I digress again. The point is that I wore her down, and I used this same determination today, to whip the legs into shape. The holes now line up. I am thrilled.

Another lesson was learned today. After an evening of sleep, the disasters of the day before, in the light of a new day, are merely opportunities to practice using my rasp. I enjoyed my woodworking today, and the time spent waxing nostalgic about freshman year.
Yep, somehow I estimated that from something your wrote.
Bill
 

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Inspired by Ziggy



I believe it was Virgil who said, "They are able because they think they are able." When I say I believe, what I really mean is that I googled famous sayings and found it waiting there for me. Saying 'I believe', is simply me having delusions of well read.

I seem to remember Stevie Wonder saying, "We all have ability. The difference is how we use it." It was a warm day in June I believe. Ok, I made that last part up.

Back in the day, I used to hang out with David Bowie and Boutros Boutros Ghali, at a club in London. It was a moist evening and Bowie was passed out near the juke box, which was playing 'Spiders from Mars'. While doing shots with a small band of traveling circus folks, Boutros said, "If at first you don't succeed, form a committee, discuss things at length, and…". He became distracted by the bar maid, then continued, "..and…what was I saying?...oh yes…Can I get another freaking round of jello shots!" Jimmy the 'Monkey Boy', looked confused, until I explained that this was the closest he had ever come to having a coherent thought. The evening ended badly, when Bowie awoke and decided he wanted to ride an elephant.

Obviously I have run amok on the ole keyboard and can't be trusted to tell a story without embellishment. And by embellishment I mean complete fabrication. I digress. Sometimes that happens when one is filled with Olympic spirit and lean pockets.



I had a wonderful couple of hours of woodworking this evening. There were several tasks I wanted to complete. First of all I needed to cut the 3/8th inch threaded rods with an ancient hacksaw. After the rods are cut, the next step is to put them into the stretchers. Once all the stretchers are ready to go, I needed to drill a 3/8th inch hole for the dowel pegs. The dowel pegs are used on the top half of each stretcher to keep the stretchers vertical and aligned when the legs are assembled. The last task on my list was to assemble the legs.
Because I have already done all of these steps during the construction of my workbench, I am able to see how I have progressed as a woodworker. Getting to this stage the first time, took 3 weeks, compared to less than a week this time. The holes I have drilled, despite their issues, were much easier with my new Bosch drill bits. Each step was easier because I had a workbench. Just having that vice makes life so much easier. The routing portion was less scary because of the jig I created. Every aspect has been faster, more accurate, and more enjoyable.



I have completed the legs for my router table. Victory is mine. The next steps will be to lay out the top of the table. I must decide if I want to use 1 or 2 sheets of ¾ inch ODF. Buy a piano hinge. Mark and cut out the opening for the router plate. Route out a channel for the T track. Install the plate and drill out the holes for router. Then I will figure out what I am going to build for a fence. It is clear that I still have a bunch of work to do, but I am excited, because these next steps are going to be new territory for me. The installation of the router plate and the drilling the holes scares me a little, but I will figure it out.

When combined, each of these little triumphs, give me confidence. I do feel I am able, and as I have completed all the tasks, have proven that it is so. Virgil was correct. So I am done for the night, time to kick back, watch Olympics and possibly listen to 'Changes'.
Looks good!

Bill
 

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Practicing Hand Cut Dovetails



I have been spending so much time working on my router table that I haven't done any pure practicing. So I set a goal to cut two sets of dovetails. Previously I had cut a set of tails, but have been way too much of a Wimpy McWimperson to try the pins. I wanted to live with the joy of the tails for a while, before I had to face the cold hard reality that the pins and tails don't really fit together that well.

Tonight reality slapped me around and called me a sissy. But that is ok, I needed it. The mental thrashing I took, from my poorly fitting joints, was somewhat motivating. When I cut the mortise and tenons, they weren't pretty, but I practiced and they got better. I am confident that my dovetails will improve too. Were I to assess both sets, I would say I made a marginal improvement from the first to the second. The first pair was pretty loose, while the second was much tighter.



The wood is oak. I used my Japanese hand saws for the cuts. I think that the main issue was with the quality of my saw cuts, especially the angled ones. I have made a fair amount of straight cuts with my saws, and the angled cuts are of a higher difficulty level. Not as high a difficulty level as the triple salchow, but I digress. Of course, cutting dovetails by hand, isn't a requirement for quality woodworking, but like the chisel work, I believe the skill will help me with my understanding of joints.



Before today I hadn't thought about the pins and their relationship to the tails. It seems the tails need to be on the side of the drawer. If it were the pins on the side, I imagine the drawer would come apart. I enjoyed my dovetail practice and it might be nice to do a small drawer and somehow graft it onto my router table. Will it look out of place? Yes, probably, but I can live with that, if it actually works and can hold my router bits.
So tonight I practiced, I chose a skill, which I don't have, and began to develop it. I believe that progress is to be celebrated. The imperfections that one creates along the way can be looked at lovingly, down the road, as sign posts on the journey taken.



On an unrelated note, my friend Steve is a financial backer of a band called, 'Hello Dave'. They are really quite good and have recently released a video on the CMT website. Apparently, if enough people go to the site and listen to the video, it is possible, that it will get elevated to the status of being played on TV. Steve has been a good friend for a long time and he has put a great deal of time and energy into 'Hello Dave', and I wanted to take the opportunity to plug them. If you would like to help Steve and 'Hello Dave', to maybe have their dream come true, all you have to do is click on the link and give it a listen. I think you will enjoy it, and I would appreciate the help. http://bit.ly/94CrCi
Nice effort! Why does the end grain look so dark in the first picture? Is that a photography trick?

I'm new to this too-did you markup your wood with a sharp tool? I've heard of using a vertical fixture (a board and a clamp) to make sure your chisel work is nearly verticial where you want it to be (hold the back of the chisel against the board). Not sure if that would help or not

Regards,
Bill
 

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Frantic Speed Shopping



The sun was out today and it was the first time this year that I noticed the days seem to be hanging out a bit longer. They are sneaky that way, sort of creeping up on spring. After all the snow this winter, I will welcome spring with a giddiness that I haven't experienced in years. Of course, it was still cold out, when I got into my car, but the sunlight on my face warmed my spirits considerably.

I had errands to run. I needed to get some petrol and oil for my car. I was craving a Jimmy John's sub, so that was also on my list. The top task on my list however, was to try to make it over to ACME tool before they closed, so I could see the Festool rep. I had marked on my calendar that he would be in town on the 24th and 25th and today is the 24th! Since I purchased Mary the Jigsaw, I have been interested in seeing either the 5" RQ 125 FEQ or the 6" RQ 150 FEQ sander in action.

The Festool representative, Matt, had a piece of tiger wood, which had recently admitted to cheating on his wife with several types of exotics, from all over the world. Not only did I get to see it in action, I got to do the sanding! It was fantastic. He explained how to hold it correctly and also told my why it was important. Because of the design, it sort of looks like one might hold the sander too far back. He explained that this would lead to horrible chatter. So I did as he had instructed and there wasn't any chatter, it was smoother than a famous golfer picking up a porn star.

We started with some 120 grit and worked our way up until we were using some weird space age polishing pads. I have read that new woodworkers often over sand. The 6" RQ 150 FEQ sander, which has a random orbital setting and a gear setting, also has an attachment which collects dust. The dust collection was incredible. There simply wasn't any, the tiny little vacuum seemed to get it all. When I had made it through all the grits and polishing pads, the wood was polished like a new driver.

Before I knew it, the store was closing. I wasn't prepared to make my purchase today, as I like to mull tool buying decisions over, but I also was not at all prepared to leave ACME tool empty handed. That would be crazy talk. So in a near panic I scooted over to the section with measuring and marking devices. I swooped down the aisle, deftly grabbing a Crown Tools 10 ½ inch bevel in rosewood, a wheel marking guage by Shop Basics, and then frantically hailed one of the remaining workers, to unlock the Freud router bit cabinet. The ACME guys are always friendly, and they never rush me, but I have developed a terrible habit of making them wait on me to close up, so I am trying to do better. I looked at my iphone and I had my new ¼" double flute straight bit, with one minute to spare. I plopped the stuff on the counter and bought them. Whew that was close.

Worry not, if you thought that the closing of ACME, cut my woodworking shopping short, for I still intended to wonder over to Home Depot. Between ACME tools and Home Depot is a Jimmy John's sub shop, so that played right into my plans. I had the #5. Yummy!

As many of you know, I am working on building a router table. I have some ¾" ODF, which I thought I might take two sheets of and glue them together for the top. I have decided against that option, in favor of a more expensive one. I want each project to teach me a bit more about woodworking. So I have decided to glue up a bunch of 1×2 pieces of hard maple and oak, to create the table. Of course, I will be standing the pieces on their edge, so that the final thickness will be similar to the 2 pieces of ODF, but it will let me do some gluing. Also, I have been dying to try out my cauls, so this should be fun.

There is one additional benefit. I plan to assemble the tops, such that there is an opening, which is about a half inch smaller than my router table plate. This eliminates the need to cut a hole. I will give a more detailed explanation about how I approached my table top, after I have completed it. I bought 70 linear feet of wood, a piano hinge, and some Titebond II Premium wood glue. All in all, a good day, and now I get to go downstairs and cut some wood.
Brian,
Is sounds like you may be planning to sand your glued top flat. Have you considered using hand planes?

Best,
Bill (proud owner of 15 new Jorgenson pony clamps and 15 pieces of 3/4", 48" black pipe-which was a purchase I spread over several months for psychological reasons! It sounds like you may need similar clamps for every 6" of top you are planning to glue as well)!
 

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Frantic Speed Shopping



The sun was out today and it was the first time this year that I noticed the days seem to be hanging out a bit longer. They are sneaky that way, sort of creeping up on spring. After all the snow this winter, I will welcome spring with a giddiness that I haven't experienced in years. Of course, it was still cold out, when I got into my car, but the sunlight on my face warmed my spirits considerably.

I had errands to run. I needed to get some petrol and oil for my car. I was craving a Jimmy John's sub, so that was also on my list. The top task on my list however, was to try to make it over to ACME tool before they closed, so I could see the Festool rep. I had marked on my calendar that he would be in town on the 24th and 25th and today is the 24th! Since I purchased Mary the Jigsaw, I have been interested in seeing either the 5" RQ 125 FEQ or the 6" RQ 150 FEQ sander in action.

The Festool representative, Matt, had a piece of tiger wood, which had recently admitted to cheating on his wife with several types of exotics, from all over the world. Not only did I get to see it in action, I got to do the sanding! It was fantastic. He explained how to hold it correctly and also told my why it was important. Because of the design, it sort of looks like one might hold the sander too far back. He explained that this would lead to horrible chatter. So I did as he had instructed and there wasn't any chatter, it was smoother than a famous golfer picking up a porn star.

We started with some 120 grit and worked our way up until we were using some weird space age polishing pads. I have read that new woodworkers often over sand. The 6" RQ 150 FEQ sander, which has a random orbital setting and a gear setting, also has an attachment which collects dust. The dust collection was incredible. There simply wasn't any, the tiny little vacuum seemed to get it all. When I had made it through all the grits and polishing pads, the wood was polished like a new driver.

Before I knew it, the store was closing. I wasn't prepared to make my purchase today, as I like to mull tool buying decisions over, but I also was not at all prepared to leave ACME tool empty handed. That would be crazy talk. So in a near panic I scooted over to the section with measuring and marking devices. I swooped down the aisle, deftly grabbing a Crown Tools 10 ½ inch bevel in rosewood, a wheel marking guage by Shop Basics, and then frantically hailed one of the remaining workers, to unlock the Freud router bit cabinet. The ACME guys are always friendly, and they never rush me, but I have developed a terrible habit of making them wait on me to close up, so I am trying to do better. I looked at my iphone and I had my new ¼" double flute straight bit, with one minute to spare. I plopped the stuff on the counter and bought them. Whew that was close.

Worry not, if you thought that the closing of ACME, cut my woodworking shopping short, for I still intended to wonder over to Home Depot. Between ACME tools and Home Depot is a Jimmy John's sub shop, so that played right into my plans. I had the #5. Yummy!

As many of you know, I am working on building a router table. I have some ¾" ODF, which I thought I might take two sheets of and glue them together for the top. I have decided against that option, in favor of a more expensive one. I want each project to teach me a bit more about woodworking. So I have decided to glue up a bunch of 1×2 pieces of hard maple and oak, to create the table. Of course, I will be standing the pieces on their edge, so that the final thickness will be similar to the 2 pieces of ODF, but it will let me do some gluing. Also, I have been dying to try out my cauls, so this should be fun.

There is one additional benefit. I plan to assemble the tops, such that there is an opening, which is about a half inch smaller than my router table plate. This eliminates the need to cut a hole. I will give a more detailed explanation about how I approached my table top, after I have completed it. I bought 70 linear feet of wood, a piano hinge, and some Titebond II Premium wood glue. All in all, a good day, and now I get to go downstairs and cut some wood.
Brian, You would need (at least) one "Heavy plane to remove a lot of stock" (a jack plane) and a smoothing plane (#4). Someone showed me how to put a lot of camber in a plane iron so that it cuts like a scrub plane. You would use that diagonally, going both ways, and finish with the smoother along the length of the table. To be honest, I'm not sure what the tolerances are for flatness on a routing table. Man-made materials probably can't be competed with for flatness, but I think that the planes will level a nice table/workbech top. Hopefully, someone who has alot more experience than I do will be willing to share their thoughts.

Bill
 

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Afternoon Delight



The memories are always there, just waiting for a reason to bubble to the surface. It can be the mouth watering smells, wafting out from a bakery, or the glow of a corn field as the day gets chased away by dusk. For me, it is often the first few bars of a favorite song. Today, driving back from Cedar Rapids, as the sun was setting, and the snow cover fields seemed somewhat less frigid, my childhood memories came knocking. As the car took me home, the radio took me back to 1976. I was nine years old, loved baseball cards, Casey Kasem, and a fun little song by Starland Vocal Band, "Afternoon Delight".

I remember sitting by the stereo, with a cassette in the player, and my finger hovering over the record button, just waiting to hear my new favorite song. At nine years old, I listened to the lyrics, "Thinkin' of you's workin' up my appetite, looking forward to a little afternoon delight." I imagined that the song was talking about eating bomb pops, which to me would be delightful. What else could it mean? "Gonna find my baby, gonna hold her tight, gonna grab some afternoon delight", that is obviously a reference to snacking, isn't it?

Of course, those who were a bit more mature knew what the song was talking about, or so they thought. Though it is a romantic little tune, the 'Afternoon Delight', is in fact, a reference to the band's favorite lunch choice, from Clyde's in DC. I learned this many years later, while sitting at the Clyde's in Chevy Chase Maryland. I looked down and saw the name of the sandwich on the menu, and when I commented to the bartender that there was a song by that title, she smiled, took the menu from my hand and flipped it to the back cover. There was the band, and the article explaining that the song was paying homage to the very sandwich I had ordered.

My first set of 4 pieces of maple, which I had glued together, was not quite as brilliant as I had hoped. The ends had small gaps between a couple of the pieces, and there was a tiny gap in the middle as well. As a group, they were connected to one another with an iron grip, but that isn't quite good enough. It is important that they be without gaps.



The learning continues. I need to apply glue evenly across the entire surface of the board. I reasoned that if I used my little plastic scraper to press glue into the gaps. Another round of clamping and success was mine. There was a brief round of clapping from the gallery.



I have read of the evils of squeeze out. How it can really mess up the look when one is applying finish. I wanted to avoid squeeze out, so I didn't apply enough glue. As I looked at my gapless glue up, I took a heavy sigh and examined the amount of glue that was on the surface. I wasn't sure how hard it would be to get rid of, but I was determined to continue my education, so into the vice it went. Out came my belt sander and I proceeded to run it across the edge until there was nary a smidgeon of glue. When the glue was gone, so was the unevenness of the individual pieces of wood.



I thought that it was possible to grind down the edges of my glue up, with my belt sander, but I feared that I would get a really wavy surface. It was much flatter than I imagined. Would it have been easier to run it through a planer? I am certain that it would have been much easier. Would it be simpler to use a hand plane? Yes, it most likely would. Am I, as a person without a planer or the correct hand plane, going to be unable to get a nice surface for my router table? I am not entirely sure yet, but I think it is entirely possible to simply sand it down, until it is flat.

It will take a while. I like sanding, so I will spend the time, because, "My motto's always been; when it's right, its right. Why wait until the middle of a cold dark night. When everything's a little clearer in the light of day. And you know the night is always going to be there anyway. Sky rockets in flight. Afternoon delight…ooo…Afternoon Delight."

Feel free to sing along.
You wrote: "I am not entirely sure yet, but I think it is entirely possible to simply sand it down, until it is flat."

I agree that you you will be able to sand it until it is smooth, but I think flatness is quite another matter. What basis do you have for thinking you can sand a large surface flat? Are you going to focus on the "high spots" with straight-edge? I don't want to see you go bonkers. But I don't speak from a great deal of experience either, so I may be completely wrong!

On the other hand, maybe only the area near the cutting edge needs to truly be flat..and sanding may be sufficent to accomplish this. Wishing you continued good luck from the sidelines!

Bill
 

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Afternoon Delight



The memories are always there, just waiting for a reason to bubble to the surface. It can be the mouth watering smells, wafting out from a bakery, or the glow of a corn field as the day gets chased away by dusk. For me, it is often the first few bars of a favorite song. Today, driving back from Cedar Rapids, as the sun was setting, and the snow cover fields seemed somewhat less frigid, my childhood memories came knocking. As the car took me home, the radio took me back to 1976. I was nine years old, loved baseball cards, Casey Kasem, and a fun little song by Starland Vocal Band, "Afternoon Delight".

I remember sitting by the stereo, with a cassette in the player, and my finger hovering over the record button, just waiting to hear my new favorite song. At nine years old, I listened to the lyrics, "Thinkin' of you's workin' up my appetite, looking forward to a little afternoon delight." I imagined that the song was talking about eating bomb pops, which to me would be delightful. What else could it mean? "Gonna find my baby, gonna hold her tight, gonna grab some afternoon delight", that is obviously a reference to snacking, isn't it?

Of course, those who were a bit more mature knew what the song was talking about, or so they thought. Though it is a romantic little tune, the 'Afternoon Delight', is in fact, a reference to the band's favorite lunch choice, from Clyde's in DC. I learned this many years later, while sitting at the Clyde's in Chevy Chase Maryland. I looked down and saw the name of the sandwich on the menu, and when I commented to the bartender that there was a song by that title, she smiled, took the menu from my hand and flipped it to the back cover. There was the band, and the article explaining that the song was paying homage to the very sandwich I had ordered.

My first set of 4 pieces of maple, which I had glued together, was not quite as brilliant as I had hoped. The ends had small gaps between a couple of the pieces, and there was a tiny gap in the middle as well. As a group, they were connected to one another with an iron grip, but that isn't quite good enough. It is important that they be without gaps.



The learning continues. I need to apply glue evenly across the entire surface of the board. I reasoned that if I used my little plastic scraper to press glue into the gaps. Another round of clamping and success was mine. There was a brief round of clapping from the gallery.



I have read of the evils of squeeze out. How it can really mess up the look when one is applying finish. I wanted to avoid squeeze out, so I didn't apply enough glue. As I looked at my gapless glue up, I took a heavy sigh and examined the amount of glue that was on the surface. I wasn't sure how hard it would be to get rid of, but I was determined to continue my education, so into the vice it went. Out came my belt sander and I proceeded to run it across the edge until there was nary a smidgeon of glue. When the glue was gone, so was the unevenness of the individual pieces of wood.



I thought that it was possible to grind down the edges of my glue up, with my belt sander, but I feared that I would get a really wavy surface. It was much flatter than I imagined. Would it have been easier to run it through a planer? I am certain that it would have been much easier. Would it be simpler to use a hand plane? Yes, it most likely would. Am I, as a person without a planer or the correct hand plane, going to be unable to get a nice surface for my router table? I am not entirely sure yet, but I think it is entirely possible to simply sand it down, until it is flat.

It will take a while. I like sanding, so I will spend the time, because, "My motto's always been; when it's right, its right. Why wait until the middle of a cold dark night. When everything's a little clearer in the light of day. And you know the night is always going to be there anyway. Sky rockets in flight. Afternoon delight…ooo…Afternoon Delight."

Feel free to sing along.
Question: would passing new boards through a 12.5" planer help with the (face-to-face) glue-up? Any sanding after the planing? I am really enjoying the discussion!

Thank you,
Bill
 

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Afternoon Delight



The memories are always there, just waiting for a reason to bubble to the surface. It can be the mouth watering smells, wafting out from a bakery, or the glow of a corn field as the day gets chased away by dusk. For me, it is often the first few bars of a favorite song. Today, driving back from Cedar Rapids, as the sun was setting, and the snow cover fields seemed somewhat less frigid, my childhood memories came knocking. As the car took me home, the radio took me back to 1976. I was nine years old, loved baseball cards, Casey Kasem, and a fun little song by Starland Vocal Band, "Afternoon Delight".

I remember sitting by the stereo, with a cassette in the player, and my finger hovering over the record button, just waiting to hear my new favorite song. At nine years old, I listened to the lyrics, "Thinkin' of you's workin' up my appetite, looking forward to a little afternoon delight." I imagined that the song was talking about eating bomb pops, which to me would be delightful. What else could it mean? "Gonna find my baby, gonna hold her tight, gonna grab some afternoon delight", that is obviously a reference to snacking, isn't it?

Of course, those who were a bit more mature knew what the song was talking about, or so they thought. Though it is a romantic little tune, the 'Afternoon Delight', is in fact, a reference to the band's favorite lunch choice, from Clyde's in DC. I learned this many years later, while sitting at the Clyde's in Chevy Chase Maryland. I looked down and saw the name of the sandwich on the menu, and when I commented to the bartender that there was a song by that title, she smiled, took the menu from my hand and flipped it to the back cover. There was the band, and the article explaining that the song was paying homage to the very sandwich I had ordered.

My first set of 4 pieces of maple, which I had glued together, was not quite as brilliant as I had hoped. The ends had small gaps between a couple of the pieces, and there was a tiny gap in the middle as well. As a group, they were connected to one another with an iron grip, but that isn't quite good enough. It is important that they be without gaps.



The learning continues. I need to apply glue evenly across the entire surface of the board. I reasoned that if I used my little plastic scraper to press glue into the gaps. Another round of clamping and success was mine. There was a brief round of clapping from the gallery.



I have read of the evils of squeeze out. How it can really mess up the look when one is applying finish. I wanted to avoid squeeze out, so I didn't apply enough glue. As I looked at my gapless glue up, I took a heavy sigh and examined the amount of glue that was on the surface. I wasn't sure how hard it would be to get rid of, but I was determined to continue my education, so into the vice it went. Out came my belt sander and I proceeded to run it across the edge until there was nary a smidgeon of glue. When the glue was gone, so was the unevenness of the individual pieces of wood.



I thought that it was possible to grind down the edges of my glue up, with my belt sander, but I feared that I would get a really wavy surface. It was much flatter than I imagined. Would it have been easier to run it through a planer? I am certain that it would have been much easier. Would it be simpler to use a hand plane? Yes, it most likely would. Am I, as a person without a planer or the correct hand plane, going to be unable to get a nice surface for my router table? I am not entirely sure yet, but I think it is entirely possible to simply sand it down, until it is flat.

It will take a while. I like sanding, so I will spend the time, because, "My motto's always been; when it's right, its right. Why wait until the middle of a cold dark night. When everything's a little clearer in the light of day. And you know the night is always going to be there anyway. Sky rockets in flight. Afternoon delight…ooo…Afternoon Delight."

Feel free to sing along.
Brian, Do a search on "scary sharp" before you lay out big bucks on sharpening equipment. Like it says in the Bible, "Count your costs" before making any big decision. There seem to be plenty of "hidden costs" in the woodworking game-I recently spent about $40 on silicon carbide sandpaper (for sharpening). Fine sharpening stones cost several multiples more but may be cheaper in the long run. Have fun!

Bill
 

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Stanley 4 1/2

Hello All,

I have begun to tune up my Stanley 4 1/2. Though I am not done, I did get the blade pretty sharp, and decided to take a break to play with it a bit. I couldn't resist the temptation. I took a couple of pictures. I love my new plane.

http://bit.ly/ayeAr9

Brian
FYI, Your cookie manager (CAPCHA?) on your website seems to be "out of order" and wouldn't let me post a comment in your blog entry above. Just curious, how do you use cookie info?
 

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Ugh...wrote blog...lost it...ugh.

Hello All,

Often I look at the clock and realize that it is 9:00 and I need to write my blog. This was the case tonight. I already had the photos, so I wrote my blog piece, added the photos and hit save on wordpress. It then disappeared!

This is the angry and bitter 2nd attempt.

http://su.pr/1CJpJD

Brian
I just got a virus warning when I tried to connect to the link at the top of the page.

The warning was: Network traffic from www3.security-power31.co.cc matches the signature of a known attack. It says "the attach was resulted from (long path) IEXPLORE.EXE."

Bill
 

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Ugh...wrote blog...lost it...ugh.

Hello All,

Often I look at the clock and realize that it is 9:00 and I need to write my blog. This was the case tonight. I already had the photos, so I wrote my blog piece, added the photos and hit save on wordpress. It then disappeared!

This is the angry and bitter 2nd attempt.

http://su.pr/1CJpJD

Brian
By the way, this is your Blog#: 255. As the son of a mathematician you must have noticed that
255 = 11111111 base 2! Maybe you can use that in your next blog. It'll be enough to make one rollover… : )

Bill
 

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Ugh...wrote blog...lost it...ugh.

Hello All,

Often I look at the clock and realize that it is 9:00 and I need to write my blog. This was the case tonight. I already had the photos, so I wrote my blog piece, added the photos and hit save on wordpress. It then disappeared!

This is the angry and bitter 2nd attempt.

http://su.pr/1CJpJD

Brian
BTW, I got exactly the same error/warning from your second link as I did from the first one.
 

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Henry Wood Ch 36

Hello All,

I appreciate the comments and feedback. Even the mean and nasty ones, like the one I received an hour or so ago on yesterday's post. I don't mind mean and nasty, if the person is also including accurate corrections, which he did. He did ask that I "please quit abusing the English language!" I guess it isn't that nasty, because he did say please. I am not sure if the exclamation point was necessary though. It is hard to say.

But it does seem reasonable to again offer my apologies to anyone who is offended by my frequent spelling and grammar errors. I can't promise that I won't make many more errors, but I am constantly trying to get better. When word press indicates I have spelled something incorrectly, I don't just right click and fix it. I try to figure out the correct spelling. Alas, word press can't catch things like using "wondered instead of wandered".

So again, I am sorry for the quality. I hope the story is at least entertaining, warts and all.

http://extremelyaverage.com/2011/01/henry-wood-time-and-again-ch-36-mikes-call/

Sincerely,

Brian
For those of us who don't have the patience to deal with 36 chapters of Henry Wood, perhaps you could write a short story to help you and us discern whether you really are a fiction writer. Maybe something akin to Hemingway's, "A Clean, Well-Lighted Place"?

http://www.mrbauld.com/hemclean.html

The main difference I think would be the amount of forethought required and attention to detail. Like carving dove-tails was for you, maybe it would be a nice exercise? I think it is unfair to expect yourself to be able to produce quality writing on a day-to-day basis. Wouldn't it be nice to produce something meaningful for all of the time you're investing? I would be willing to volunteer my effort as a critic, if you would like thoughtful criticism. I think excellence comes through rewriting and rewriting. The idea of having numerous spelling errors ought to be a silly notion.

Bill
 

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Henry Wood Ch 36

Hello All,

I appreciate the comments and feedback. Even the mean and nasty ones, like the one I received an hour or so ago on yesterday's post. I don't mind mean and nasty, if the person is also including accurate corrections, which he did. He did ask that I "please quit abusing the English language!" I guess it isn't that nasty, because he did say please. I am not sure if the exclamation point was necessary though. It is hard to say.

But it does seem reasonable to again offer my apologies to anyone who is offended by my frequent spelling and grammar errors. I can't promise that I won't make many more errors, but I am constantly trying to get better. When word press indicates I have spelled something incorrectly, I don't just right click and fix it. I try to figure out the correct spelling. Alas, word press can't catch things like using "wondered instead of wandered".

So again, I am sorry for the quality. I hope the story is at least entertaining, warts and all.

http://extremelyaverage.com/2011/01/henry-wood-time-and-again-ch-36-mikes-call/

Sincerely,

Brian
I'm reminded of an old Yogi Berra-sm: "Good enough is seldom good enough." I think that real learning occurs when one works hard to do better. I think Brain could "ceep up with the entertainment" for years-but at what cost? This message is not directed at Brian or Dennis, but rather to anyone who might allow thin skin to lull them into a state of complacency. Woodworking is all about producing excellence with wood, no? Maybe "wordworking" is about producing excellence with words. Have fun!

Bill
 

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Henry Wood Ch 36

Hello All,

I appreciate the comments and feedback. Even the mean and nasty ones, like the one I received an hour or so ago on yesterday's post. I don't mind mean and nasty, if the person is also including accurate corrections, which he did. He did ask that I "please quit abusing the English language!" I guess it isn't that nasty, because he did say please. I am not sure if the exclamation point was necessary though. It is hard to say.

But it does seem reasonable to again offer my apologies to anyone who is offended by my frequent spelling and grammar errors. I can't promise that I won't make many more errors, but I am constantly trying to get better. When word press indicates I have spelled something incorrectly, I don't just right click and fix it. I try to figure out the correct spelling. Alas, word press can't catch things like using "wondered instead of wandered".

So again, I am sorry for the quality. I hope the story is at least entertaining, warts and all.

http://extremelyaverage.com/2011/01/henry-wood-time-and-again-ch-36-mikes-call/

Sincerely,

Brian
: ) It took me a few minutes to identify your allusion-and I like that.

Bill
 
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