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Henry Wood Detective Agency_Thursday Morning



Henry woke up early and couldn't get back to sleep. The furniture warehouse didn't open until 8 am, but the clock said it was 3 am. He had been asleep for 4 hours. He laid there for another hour and decided he might as well get an early start. An egg sandwich, cup of joe at the diner, and some pleasant conversation with Mable; the sassy little waitress and he had killed an hour. He rolled into the office at around 6:30 and made a list.

Call Luna and ask if she has heard from her father and bring her up to date.
Call Miss Culberson and tell her as little as possible. Henry didn't trust her at all.
Buy groceries and some 1×2's in maple. Henry hadn't done any shopping in a while and his cupboards were looking as bare as 1113 17th street.

And lastly and most importantly, check out the furniture warehouse and the Frid cabinet.
He tore the list off his pad and folded it neatly before putting it in his jacket pocket. Henry smiled at himself; he couldn't remember ever folding anything neatly. Mr. Alexander seemed to be rubbing off on him. He picked up the phone and 15 minutes later had updated Miss Alexander and reassured Miss Culberson that he was hot on the trail of a clue.



He walked down stair and out onto the street. His car was parked in the alley. The street was now busy with morning hustle and bustle. Henry could smell trouble at 100 paces. They sat in their car, reading the paper, but not turning the pages, just holding them there, it was a dead giveaway. There was a third thug leaning against a lamp post, also not reading a newspaper. Henry decided that they could tail him for a while. He would go poke around the lumber yard, buy what he needed and then lose them.

He found some nice hard maple 1×2's and picked up four 7 foot lengths and bunch of screws, washers, and other miscellaneous items. He loved the lumber yard. It was a big place almost maze like. He knew everyone there and when he went up to the counter he whispered to the manager, "Hey Bill, could you put this stuff on my tab? I need to lose my friends. I will pick it up later." Then at normal voice, "Oh wait, I forgot something." And he whirled around and headed back into the yard. The thugs followed, trying to look casual. Henry made a couple of quick turns and then up some stairs and into the manager's office, which had a convenient back door. He winked at Bill's secretary as he strolled past. She smiled. The thugs got back outside in time to see the tail lights rounding the corner two blocks away.

Henry took a circuitous route to the furniture warehouse, just to be safe. After some words with the man in charge, he was allowed to take a look at the cabinet. He opened the cabinet it was empty. He looked into the drawers and admired the dovetail joints. Each drawer was carefully removed and each one was magnificent, but held no clues. The old man who had showed Henry to the chest asked what he was looking for, and Henry explained that he thought there might be a message from a friend. The old man wasn't one of those people who suffered from being curious and just shrugged.

"This cabinet does have a secret drawer." And he carefully showed Henry how it opened.

"That is incredible; I would have never found that." He said in awe.

"That is why it is called a 'secret drawer'." said the old man with a wink and a smile.

Henry pulled it open slowly and there it was, the journal that Miss Culberson was after.

"Would you look at that? It wasn't there before. I guess your friend did leave you a message."

"I guess he did." said Henry with a grin, a wink and a nod. He didn't open the journal past the first page; he saw the meticulous handwriting and knew that it was the work of Mr. Alexander. He just tucked it into his jacket and thanked the old man, slipping him a twenty, to forget that he had been there. Henry decided it wasn't safe to go back to his office and he wasn't sure about the lumber yard, so he went to the library. He could bury himself in the stacks and give the journal the once over.

Henry took out his neatly folded list and turned it over. Page by page he slowly looked over all the entries. There weren't any names, and the numbers didn't make any sense at all. With each turn He found page after page of neatly written and obviously coded financial data. When he turned the last page, there was a note, neatly taped onto the back of the last page.

Dear Henry,

You are as clever as I had hoped. It will soon be noticed that I am missing. I cannot tell you where I will be when you find this. I myself don't know. I just know that the little book you are holding has all the financials to put a very powerful and dangerous man behind bars for the rest of his life.
I went to the police and told them everything just before Christmas. This was a mistake and I should have known better. It has gotten out that somebody at the firm was going to turn states evidence. They didn't know who it was at first, but as soon as I don't show up for work, they will put two and two together. I gave Luna instructions to find you, if I ever stopped coming home. You need to make sure she is safe.

I can't come out of hiding to testify as he has men everywhere. I need you to get this journal to the district attorney. After you do, I will need you to find the key, so that the book can be decoded. It is too risky to keep them together. Once the DA has both of them, he should have all he needs.

Thanks

A

Henry was suddenly worried about Luna. He hid the journal among the books at the library. He knew every floor and ever section of the library. The section on economic theory was generally ignored by the reading public, so he slid the journal behind several volumes by David Ricardo. He skipped lunch and drove straight out to see Luna. Suddenly he worried that the thugs he had shaken, might have gone their next. He couldn't worry about the groceries, or lumber, or woodworking, he had to find her and get her to a safe place. He just hoped he wasn't too late.
No I can't wait until morning to read each of your daily blogs. As an old man I need the sleep, but could not sleep if I didn't have the latest clues. For that mater, I am not sleeping all that well in antcipation. Your blog is great.
 

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Creating the Cauls



In Vol 28, No. 164, on page 6 of Woodsmith magazine is the article which describes the Adjustable Panels Cauls. It was sent in by George Johnson of Canton Oklahoma. They give the dimensions and I followed them somewhat closely. I visited my local Home Depot to buy the goodies I would need to make my cauls. I purchased (4) seven feet long, 1×2, in hard maple. I like hard maple. I also purchased (4) 36 inches long ½ x 3 inch pieces of Oak. I only needed one piece of the oak, but I wanted the other pieces for another project. So only buy 1 if you don't want extra, and to be honest, I didn't use the entire one piece either, I only used 18 inches.

As for the hardware, I came very close to making a tightening handle blunder, when I nearly bought a handle with the male threaded rod attached. This would have been a mistake. The handles need to be female which allow the threaded part of the 5/16th carriage bolt to pass through. Which brings me to the quantities of stuff I needed, the plans required 4 handles, 4 washers (I bought 8 to allow for losing a few), (24) #8, 1 ¾ "flat head screws (I bought a box). I also bought a box of 1 1/4" flat head screw, because I didn't believe the instructions. The 1 ¾ looked way too long. They were not too long and actually worked wonderfully.



Being new to woodworking, I lack confidence, so I bought extra stuff, which I didn't need. I then reinforced my fears when I purchased (3) 5" 5/16" carriage bolts and (1) 5 ½" carriage bolt. I blindly trusted the little bin that told me I was buying 5 inch, and it was very sneaky in giving me a 5 ½ bolt. I fixed the problem by buying (3) 5 ½" and (1) 5" the next day. So I have an extra set that will allow for thicker boards to be in my glue up. In the photos I used the 5 ½ inch bolt. I may buy some longer ones too. The reason one can't just buy really long bolts is that the threads don't go all the way down the bolt. If I had bought a 7 inch, I wouldn't have been able to tighten them all the way down.



So here is how I built my cauls. I cut (8) 36" pieces of hard maple, using my Japanese hand saw. I was amazed at how quickly it cut through each piece, and how beautiful the cuts turned out. It was definitely the right tool for the job.



I like sanding. I have read that many woodworkers don't like sanding their projects. It is considered drudgery. I took 2 pieces and clamped them into my vice and sanded the top to a nice rounded edge on the outside edges on the top side of the two pieces. My reasoning was, it was a waste of time to sand the inside edges, so I didn't. I also didn't sand the bottom edges, because I wanted them to remain flat. So I sanded up each pair. I used 80, 120, 220 grit paper and my mouse sander.

The next step was to cut off 1 ½"blocks from the piece of oak. My Japanese hand saw handled this task as well. The blocks are used as spacers between the pieces of hard maple. There are 3 spacers per caul piece (top and bottom) and created the gap that allows the carriage bolts to be threaded up through the top and bottom. It means that one is able to move the clamping handles in to the edges of the wood when clamping, to apply the most pressure onto the wood being glued up.

So with 12 pieces of oak cut, I stacked them together and sanded the tops, rounding the edges. This was done for aesthetics.

The next step was to screw everything together. I placed a spacer in the middle, at 18 inches and one on each end, set in 1 ½ inches from the edge. I have no idea why they weren't all the way out to the edge, but in the article, that is how George Johnson did it, and it looked good to me. I then flipped the pieces of wood upside down, with the rounded edges on the table, and placed my oak spacers in the correct positions. Next I clamped everything together, before drilling pilot holes. I then used a countersink bit to drill out a bit of space for the flat head screws to set into the wood. To make my life easier I got out both of my cordless drills, using one as a dedicated pilot holes driller and the other for the countersinking and the screwing in of the flat head screws. ( I am not sure all of the verbs in the last sentence really exist, but I digress)

Once all of this was done, I just needed to cut some blocks to hold the carriage bolts. The instructions called for 3 ½ inch blocks, but I had a lovely piece of hard maple that was 12 inches long, so I went with 3 inches for each block. Yes it was a daring move, but I am not afraid to live life on the edge. I sanded the 12 inch block before I made the cuts. I also drilled the holes, first with a Fostner bit, then with a regular bit. This meant that after I cut them into their 3 inch lengths, they were ready to go.



The last step was to check the flatness of the bottoms of each caul section. I had focused on making sure that the tops were flat, because I intended to flatten any that needed it, using my router. There was only one that needed flattening, so I used my 2 inch flush trim bit. It is a really nice bit, made by Amana. I spent $128.00 on this bit. That seems like a lot, but I have already used it a bunch of times. And it cuts like a hot knife through brie.

When I finally assembled the cauls, they looked even better than I had hoped. Now I just need to find a project that requires a glue up.
Great looking cauls. So good that they beg another project. A nice wax paper dispenser to keep near by. Surely we don't want to get glue squeeze out on our cauls, so we will put wax paper on the glue up to protect them.
 

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Abby Someone



"Whose brain did you bring me?" asked young Frankenstein.

"Abby someone…Abby Normal I believe" responded Igor.

If you are a movie buff, or Royce Alger, then it will be obvious that this is from the classic Mel Brooks film, "Young Frankenstein" It sprang to mind when I was asked if I was normal.

I had been carrying on a conversation with a woman on Linkedin. I sent her an invitation to connect, and she responded, "Going to hope you're not oddball-seems normal. Usually add people I know well to connect - but been more open, these days. Want to be in a 'good crowd' - perceptions = reality"

Naturally I assumed she meant Donald Sutherland's character in the 1970's classic 'Kelly's Heroes', Sgt. Oddball. Or perhaps she actually meant Donald Sutherland, either way; it was probably a good idea to make sure I wasn't Mr. Sutherland.

I responded, "Define normal.", after I determined that she was using the adjective oddball, and applying it to me. Actually, she was saying I seemed normal. This concerned me, because it was apparent, in our brief conversation, that I may have misrepresented myself.

She responded, "Not sure I can. but funny come-back. Guess I'll just have to follow you to see."
I liked her wait and see attitude. She was leaving the door open to bailing, but doing it in such a way that was not at all offensive to me. I thought she was being quite prudent. But I did feel a bit guilty, knowing as I did, the ultimate conclusion she would reach. So I felt obligated to respond.

It was a great question, one that I think everyone should ask of themselves.

The more I thought about it, I came to the conclusion that I am not normal at all. I am the son of a mathematician, and when I think of normal, I think of a normal distribution curve.

"I have worked very hard to avoid being part of the normal distribution in all that I do. I found a fun game yesterday, and have been playing it, trying to move further away from 'normal'. [Editors note: The Eyeballing Game]

I love to read. Surely that isn't normal in this day and age. I am fascinated by words and language and like to play scrabble. Most of my friends find the game boring, so they would say that isn't normal.

I worked as a volunteer docent at the Corcoran gallery in DC, for a year, before I moved back to Iowa. Most people wouldn't want to spend hours in a museum, most normal people that is.

I have a PC and an iphone, and like both Apple and Microsoft, surely that is odd. Many people get as worked up about Apple vs. Microsoft, as they do about politics. I don't. That isn't normal at all.

In my blog, I wrote an introduction in iambic pentameter, just to see if I could. Most normal people have never heard of this style, and I am sure, don't feel that they are missing anything.
People who are passionate about politics consider their positions normal, though half the country disagrees with them.

A normal person would prefer to go to a movie, in a group, watch endless car chases and gun play. I would rather go to a foreign film, alone, and then meet up with my 'car chase, no dialogue' loving friends afterwards.

I bought an electric piano, with weighted keys, when I was 38, just because I have always wanted to learn the piano. I still stink, but I love to play around with it. Who does that? Certainly not a normal person.

I just can't think of a single thing in my life that is 'normal'. I am happy though. I really enjoy life. Which, I would assume, is also, not normal."

She liked my response, and thought it should be part of a blog post. I just checked and we are still connected. I will send to her the link to tonight's blog post, and she can read some of the other silliness.
Perhaps then she will be able to finally conclude, that on a scale of normal to oddball, I am tilting towards odd.



I thought about this a lot tonight, as I ran my router over the laminate top. Each pass is so close to perfect, so much better than the other side, that I am almost amazed. The sanding is going to take far less time. I will then use the same methodology on the middle section. Once that is done, I will be able to move onto cutting the middle section in half, routing the edges to take the router plate, and then glue the 3 table pieces together.



I am confident that I can get through all of those steps this weekend. It feels like I am well over half way done with my router table, though I could be wrong. It is possible I will decide to add some upgrades to it, thus moving the finishing line further and further away. It is ok though, as it all makes me better at this wonderful hobby.

Well now I am going to go back into my basement, on a Friday night, and spend hours and hours playing with chunks of wood. That seems a little odd to me, but perhaps I am not the person to ask. [Editor's note: Normally we don't include cow shots.]
You are correct. A simple yes or no would not have bin adequate.
 

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Progressing Slowly



The flattening of the router table top took slightly less time than it did for China to put up a wall to keep out the neighbors' goats. I estimate that I spent around seven or eight hours flattening my laminated table top. I would imagine that, if I had run the boards through a planer, and then did some sanding; it would have taken less than 30 minutes. That is ok though, as I enjoyed myself and it is done now.

I really like the breadboard look. My friend Ryan made a really cool coffee table with a breadboard top and welded iron rods together, to create the legs. It is a brilliant use of materials which, when combined, created a stunning look. One day I may try my hand at welding and make my own version of his coffee table.

The next step in my router table is to figure out a good plan for routing out the edges, so that the base plate will fit in nicely. I have just cut the middle section in half. I decided to take a break after the cut and the stress testing. Stress testing you say? Why yes I did. I decided that to be thorough, I should let one of the halves drop to the floor while I focused on the circular saw. I like to be very careful with my power tools. The stress test indicated that one of the glue joints should probably be redone.

Ok, that isn't actually how it went down. But as it has been suggested, one of the keys to mastering woodworking is to be creative in how one looks upon unforeseen issues. I cut the pieces in half, one half was clamped to my workbench, the other half was in my right hand and I reached down to drop it, so I could bring my right hand up to my saw. When I did this, the one piece became two. So I called it a stress test and felt much better. Those two pieces have been glued back together and the glue is setting up at this very moment. There haven't been too many mistakes thus far, so I didn't feel to terrible, and I would rather have it happen now, than later on.

Right now, while I wait for the glue to dry, I am going to open up my Rousseau router base plate. There are lots of parts, which seem to be crying out to be lost. So I have a small bucket next to me, and I will carefully count them and toss them in the bucket. That way, I will know which ones I have lost, when I drop the bucket and the tiny parts shoot out in all directions. Now that I look at the packaging, it appears designed to explode the tiny bits everywhere, upon opening. It is obvious that I should open this in a space that will make it easier to track down the stuff, but alas, I am not going to follow gut on this one, and open it while I sit at my computer chair. Here it goes.

(1) Silver thingy that seems to be used by sticking it into the router plate for free hand routing of curved surfaces.

(6) Little brass things that one puts into wood, so that one can then screw tiny screws into them. I am guessing they have a name. Hopefully someone will be able to tell me what they are actually called.

(6) Plastic screws that fit into the brass things. I matched each one up with one of the brass things, so that I will lose them in pairs. That thought comforts me.

(1) Router base plate and instructions. I am very pleased to see the directions. I feared they would assume I knew what I was doing.

(4) Black plastic things with oval openings. Perhaps the directions will call these parts by their names? That would be lovely.

(4) Steel screws. Ok I don't really know what they are made of, but it is definitely metal and not plastic.

(4) Nuts with little spiky things on them. It is painfully apparent that my woodworking vocabulary is woefully inadequate. I paired the screws and nuts too.

Ok, now I am going to read the instructions.

Ok, page one has the word WARNING with exclamation points in triangles, all over it. I haven't read the warnings yet, but I am sure their inclusion, is a good indication, that it is likely thousands of people have been maimed or killed during the installation. Ok, the warnings were for general router use. Always wear eye protection, which I do, and don't wear loose clothing, which I don't. The word death did appear twice though.

The black plastic things are Corner Snuggers, which is a trademarked term, so don't go throwing it around all willie nillie.

The directions have instilled a sense of dread. My confidence is hovering around 12 %. Of course, I was equally terrified when I started to flatten the table top, and that turned out ok. I think I will stare at my shinny Rousseau plate for a bit, and perhaps become one with it. I am sure that is what a sharpening monk would do.
You are correct to read the instructions now. The more normal MO is "when all else failes, read the instructions".
 

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Angry Pants and Pop-Tarts



The DVD 'Chip Carving', with Wayne Barton, starts out with some Bavarian folk music as Wayne narrates about chip carving. Ok, I am not exactly sure about the music, but it is not terribly modern. It is pretty cheesy. I can't say for sure, but I would guess it was cheesy in 1986 too. Despite the rather simple production quality, I think this is going to be a good video.

The tools required are a carving knife and a stabbing knife. I have only a carving, so stabbing will have to wait. The dimensions for the first instructional carving lines are 2 mm, 4 mm, 4 mm and 2 mm. Thus far, drawing lines is within my skill set.

Ok, this is going to be a short blog tonight. Apparently I was a bit cocky when I said, "drawing lines is within my skill set". Drawing the lines on the wood, so I can start the video has pissed me off terribly. I am no longer having fun. I like the idea of chip carving and I am going to stay with it, but I am not going to write anymore for now. That being said let me write a bit more. I have become an 'Angry Pants'. I love precision and the problem seems to be that my eyes are not as good as they used to be. I have reading glasses and they seem to be helping a little bit, but I am still not at all getting perfect lines.

I think the problem, nay the source of my anger, is not the silly 2 and 4 millimeter lines, it is the whole getting old thing. I don't like it. I don't like it one bit. Who do I talk to about this? It is the freaking twenty first century and we haven't solved this whole aging thing yet? Come on people! Surely there are some mad scientists, or at the very least, some mildly disgruntled scientists, who are trying to fix this annoying problem?

With each passing year I come to grips with what can't be done. I am 5' 6" tall. In my late 30's I gave up on the thought that one day, I would become a rabid gym rat, work on my calves, and eventually be able to dunk. I am older than all the pro athletes, in all the sports, so the dream of suddenly developing into a world class tennis player has vanished. The list goes on, dating a super model, winning a noble peace price, finding the secret to alchemy, and dating another super model, have all been scratched off as being unreasonable.

Of course, all of these dreams were unreasonable from the beginning, and I know this. However, when one is day dreaming, before entering their 40's, it is still possible to be delusional enough to imagine qualifying for the U.S. Open. Naturally this then leads to beating Tiger Woods on the 18th hole, by making eagle, with an 8 iron, from 154 yards. To say that I am a dreamer, well that is an understatement.

So, now that I have come to grips with all that is not possible, I ask you, is it unreasonable to dream of being able to draw parallel freaking lines? That is all I want. A few lines, equidistant apart. No supermodels, no U.S. Open, no saving the world, I just want to draw some lines. I am not sure if I can set the bar any lower.

Chip carving is now my sworn enemy. I will obsess with it, I will hunt it down, and I will make it do my bidding! I am so angry I could spit, ok, not spit per se, but I am angry enough to eat two pop-tarts. Yes, I know, that doesn't sound very angry. Eating a pop-tart is hardly an act of a disgruntled woodworker, but truth be known, I am also too old to get very worked up, even when I am angry.

They are blueberry. They are delicious. I am going to try to draw some more lines.
I am much much older than you. To compound the age problem I had a serious eye injury in Des Moines in 1940 which is making things harder in my advanced age. I can share my method of making straight lines on wood. I use a piece of wood for a guide and a pizza cutter to make the mark. The good news is that as you work through the stages and reach the point where you are working through your senility. You will be much calmer and forgiving. Or is it unaware?
 

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David Has a Great Point

Hello All,

I had some of the Lumberjock folks come over and check out my blog and at least one of the cats (Outputter). The comment that it was hard to leave comments was helpful. I didn't realize that I had the 'must be approved' bit turned on. That has been fixed.

Yesterday's little bit that asked people to click on the link had some great comments too. David had a wonderful point, explaining why people didn't want to click on the link. He explained that the Lumberjock community is just that a community, and it isn't the same to have to leave, via a click, to read someone's blog. I can completely understand this and I am sure there are lots of people, probably the majority who feel this way.

There was one comment that mentioned a preference for posts with pictures, and I agree with that 100%. I have not done as good a job of photographing my work of late. The photography portion usually adds an hour to the time it takes to get everything up, but I think it is worth it. I will try to do better, of course, I don't know if he is one of the people who will read my blog, but his suggestion was a great one regardless.

Lastly, I would like to say I really appreciate all the help and feedback I have received in the first 72 days of my journey. I am sorry and saddened that most of you aren't interested in reading my blog anymore. I will really miss your comments, but I completely understand. :)

Well I have to get back to my woodworking and the blog. Tonight I made a horrible blunder while routing the dado on my beautiful table top. I almost cried. I was installing the miter track and though it is in, it is marred, but I digress.

Thanks Again Everyone (And the cats too)

Brian Meeks
ExtremelyAverage.com
Will Harry Wood be found at extremelyaverage.com or will we have to wait for him to come out in hard cover and or a movie?
 

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I have started the mallet

Hello Lumberjocks,

It was beautiful in Martelle Iowa today, so I didn't do as much woodworking as I would have liked, but I did start my mallet. I have no idea if my design will work out, but I have had a bit of fun thus far. I have a couple of pictures today of the scraps I chose for the project.

http://bit.ly/9Rkq7z

Thanks,

Brian
I liked the wood's joke. I listened to some wood as I read your blog and it kept saying " think Pennsylvania , think Pennsylvania.
 

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The list isn't done...

Hello Lumberjocks,

If you read Friday's post, you will know I made a to do list for the weekend. I have not completed all of it, but have made a reasonable effort. The 6th, 7th, and 8th items are now done, the 8th being write another installment of the Henry Wood Detective Agency.

I hope you enjoy it.

http://bit.ly/aThlZK

Brian
Brian you have left us in suspense again. It seams that we may be moving toward some trouble in Times Square.
 

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Happy Mother's Day

Hello All Mommy LJ's…and the rest too,

I had a nice day with mom and dad. Then when I got back home I did some practicing on my 100 line cuts. 20 cuts down and I am happy thus far. I included a couple of pictures. I hope you enjoyed the post, it was a better than average one, if I do say so myself.

http://bit.ly/aVbmcz

Brian
I can understand not involving breakfast and brunch, but how did you avoid the age old question of dinner or supper.
 

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More from the Mystery Series

Hello All,

I was on fire tonight. I know I just did a Henry Wood yesterday, but I got on a roll and did another one.

http://bit.ly/dBSA2P

I actually thought tonight's chapter was pretty good writing. I hope you enjoy it.

Brian
Does Bobby have papers for days in the future on the top of his stack? Does he know who will win the world series?
 

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If you hate William Faulkner...

Hello LJs,

Tonight I wrote a 'stream of consciousness' blog pieces. If you hated reading William Faulkner in school, you will find tonight's post to be painful. It does have an exciting ending. So I really can't say if I am recommending you bother checking it out or not. I guess I leave it up to you to determine your own fate and how you chose to spend the next 2 minutes and 45 seconds.

http://extremelyaverage.com/2010/05/i-think-therefore-i-rant/

Brian
Why is the monkey always the trouble maker? If they can get Greg interested in baseball he can replace all his anger with passionate frustration.
 

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I rescued some wood today.

Hello LJ's,

Today I worked on my dovetail cutting, which was fun and humbling. I also rescued some wood. I don't know what to do with the wood. It is silver maple. I am really puzzled, but alas, I couldn't let it just get burned up.

http://bit.ly/9r8qIc

Brian
Brian; The first thing you need to do to your new found wood is to seal the ends of the logs. Any old latex paint will do. This will help prevent cracking and checking of the logs as they dry. Some of those logs appare to be limbs, and as such may not be stable when sawed into boards. The fibers in the limbs of trees are subject to great bending pressure in their before life. These same pressures are not found in the vertical growth. Never fear ,however, you have done a good thing saving the wood from the fire of damnation. Be proud and have fun.
 

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Ch 37

Hello All,

Another Henry Wood, for Dennis, Bill, Canadianchips, and anyone else who is following the adventure (yes even Shirley too. :)). Now I think I am going to make a master copy of all the chapters thus far, and start trying a bit of rewriting. It couldn't hurt. I might learn a thing or two. :)

Brian

http://extremelyaverage.com/2011/01/henry-wood-time-and-again-ch-37-the-captain/
Brian; You have droped in a lot of threads. Will Henry pull the right one or get tangled in the wrong one? I will have to keep checking in at Extremely Average to find out. I like lots of words, but are you making a lot of work for that special editor of yours. AKA-MOM.
I don't recal. Has a tool been named Mickey Yet?

Keep up the good work. Nils
 

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Hello Long Lost Friends

Hello LJs,

I have not posted in a long long time. I used to post every night, but eventually my blog was no longer about woodworking, just additional chapters of my Henry Wood Detective novels.

Back in October I got a job which required leaving my home. The long commute really shortened my days and I lost my 'Woodworking Time'. I had only enough time to write every day.

On Monday I went to the Woodsmith store and picked up a couple of magazines and a nice piece of cherry. I intend to make a few more tiny boxes to give away to promote the release of my first novel. 'The Henry Wood Detective Agency' got its start right here on Lumberjocks and now I am about to finish up the 3rd in the series. (All three should be released this summer, with at least the 1st one having a print edition.)

I wanted to thank everyone who encouraged me and followed Henry on his adventures. So Thanks. Tonight I wrote a blog post with some of the details about how Henry Wood came about and where he is now, if anyone is interested.

http://extremelyaverage.com/2011/05/story-of-the-writing-of-henry-wood/

Thanks,

Brian

p.s. I will however keep posting anything with woodworking foibles. :) Monday I start my new tiny boxes!
Good to see you back here Brian. I check in each evening at Extremely Average and follow you thare. I like the current story and look forward to seeing all the sub lines come togather. Thank you for your writing. Nils
 
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