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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Starting Point

Hi folks!

From time to time I've read posts on the LJ forum, but this is the first time I've posted, or rather blogged here.

A bit of background about myself. My father was at one time a high-school shop teacher, but for reasons I can only guess (and I have a pretty good guess), he never taught me woodworking - and did little woodworking during the years I grew up. The only shop/stationary power tools that Dad had were a Craftsman, model 100 RAS, dating back to the mid-50's and some kind of 12" planer he picked up used along the way but never bought a motor for. Some years ago, thinking I would never use it, I gave the planer away to my old pastor who had helped me pull a stump. When I went with him to his shop to help him unload it, it turned out that the pastor already had a 20" planer and a 42!!" planer. I'm thinking I may be able to get Dad's old planer back - tho I'm still not sure I'll want it.

My guess at why Dad never taught me woodworking is that Mom probably feared I'd cut off some useful body part (which is a very reasonable fear for any parent). So far I've managed to avoid that.

The 50's model RAS I still have and use, in fact my most recent project was to build an 8-foot left extension table with a 104" Incra track on it to convert the RAS into a crosscutting station - for both length cuts and dados.

As I've written in my profile, I've been a beginning woodworker for 12 years and I figure I'll continue to be a beginning woodworker for another year or two before I become (hopefully), and moderatly skilled intermediate amateur.

So, I've current got in the shop

55-year-old Craftsman RAS - with 80-tooth, thin kerf Freud blade.
12-year-old Ridgid TS2424 - with the same Freud blade,
Harbor Freight 6" joiner (still in the box - just bought it a couple of weeks ago)
HF 2HP dust collector (also still in the box)
HF "smallest DP ever" ($50 item)

Porter-Cable circular saw (I cut panels on the floor with a clamp-on guide)
HF plunge router I picked up for $50 a few weeks ago,
various other hand power tools.

I hope to aquire soon

Bandsaw
Router Table and associated positioning system.
TS fence upgrade
TS miter sled.

OK, that's a long post - better stop.

-Ocelot
 

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Registered
Joined
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3,877 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Starting Point

Hi folks!

From time to time I've read posts on the LJ forum, but this is the first time I've posted, or rather blogged here.

A bit of background about myself. My father was at one time a high-school shop teacher, but for reasons I can only guess (and I have a pretty good guess), he never taught me woodworking - and did little woodworking during the years I grew up. The only shop/stationary power tools that Dad had were a Craftsman, model 100 RAS, dating back to the mid-50's and some kind of 12" planer he picked up used along the way but never bought a motor for. Some years ago, thinking I would never use it, I gave the planer away to my old pastor who had helped me pull a stump. When I went with him to his shop to help him unload it, it turned out that the pastor already had a 20" planer and a 42!!" planer. I'm thinking I may be able to get Dad's old planer back - tho I'm still not sure I'll want it.

My guess at why Dad never taught me woodworking is that Mom probably feared I'd cut off some useful body part (which is a very reasonable fear for any parent). So far I've managed to avoid that.

The 50's model RAS I still have and use, in fact my most recent project was to build an 8-foot left extension table with a 104" Incra track on it to convert the RAS into a crosscutting station - for both length cuts and dados.

As I've written in my profile, I've been a beginning woodworker for 12 years and I figure I'll continue to be a beginning woodworker for another year or two before I become (hopefully), and moderatly skilled intermediate amateur.

So, I've current got in the shop

55-year-old Craftsman RAS - with 80-tooth, thin kerf Freud blade.
12-year-old Ridgid TS2424 - with the same Freud blade,
Harbor Freight 6" joiner (still in the box - just bought it a couple of weeks ago)
HF 2HP dust collector (also still in the box)
HF "smallest DP ever" ($50 item)

Porter-Cable circular saw (I cut panels on the floor with a clamp-on guide)
HF plunge router I picked up for $50 a few weeks ago,
various other hand power tools.

I hope to aquire soon

Bandsaw
Router Table and associated positioning system.
TS fence upgrade
TS miter sled.

OK, that's a long post - better stop.

-Ocelot
Thanks for the welcome, Christopher. I wasn't sure anybody would notice a blog post from a newby.
 

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Registered
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27,252 Posts
Starting Point

Hi folks!

From time to time I've read posts on the LJ forum, but this is the first time I've posted, or rather blogged here.

A bit of background about myself. My father was at one time a high-school shop teacher, but for reasons I can only guess (and I have a pretty good guess), he never taught me woodworking - and did little woodworking during the years I grew up. The only shop/stationary power tools that Dad had were a Craftsman, model 100 RAS, dating back to the mid-50's and some kind of 12" planer he picked up used along the way but never bought a motor for. Some years ago, thinking I would never use it, I gave the planer away to my old pastor who had helped me pull a stump. When I went with him to his shop to help him unload it, it turned out that the pastor already had a 20" planer and a 42!!" planer. I'm thinking I may be able to get Dad's old planer back - tho I'm still not sure I'll want it.

My guess at why Dad never taught me woodworking is that Mom probably feared I'd cut off some useful body part (which is a very reasonable fear for any parent). So far I've managed to avoid that.

The 50's model RAS I still have and use, in fact my most recent project was to build an 8-foot left extension table with a 104" Incra track on it to convert the RAS into a crosscutting station - for both length cuts and dados.

As I've written in my profile, I've been a beginning woodworker for 12 years and I figure I'll continue to be a beginning woodworker for another year or two before I become (hopefully), and moderatly skilled intermediate amateur.

So, I've current got in the shop

55-year-old Craftsman RAS - with 80-tooth, thin kerf Freud blade.
12-year-old Ridgid TS2424 - with the same Freud blade,
Harbor Freight 6" joiner (still in the box - just bought it a couple of weeks ago)
HF 2HP dust collector (also still in the box)
HF "smallest DP ever" ($50 item)

Porter-Cable circular saw (I cut panels on the floor with a clamp-on guide)
HF plunge router I picked up for $50 a few weeks ago,
various other hand power tools.

I hope to aquire soon

Bandsaw
Router Table and associated positioning system.
TS fence upgrade
TS miter sled.

OK, that's a long post - better stop.

-Ocelot
Let me add my welcome as well and say that we are glad to have you on board, Ocelot. And thanks for the introduction too.
 

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Registered
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623 Posts
Starting Point

Hi folks!

From time to time I've read posts on the LJ forum, but this is the first time I've posted, or rather blogged here.

A bit of background about myself. My father was at one time a high-school shop teacher, but for reasons I can only guess (and I have a pretty good guess), he never taught me woodworking - and did little woodworking during the years I grew up. The only shop/stationary power tools that Dad had were a Craftsman, model 100 RAS, dating back to the mid-50's and some kind of 12" planer he picked up used along the way but never bought a motor for. Some years ago, thinking I would never use it, I gave the planer away to my old pastor who had helped me pull a stump. When I went with him to his shop to help him unload it, it turned out that the pastor already had a 20" planer and a 42!!" planer. I'm thinking I may be able to get Dad's old planer back - tho I'm still not sure I'll want it.

My guess at why Dad never taught me woodworking is that Mom probably feared I'd cut off some useful body part (which is a very reasonable fear for any parent). So far I've managed to avoid that.

The 50's model RAS I still have and use, in fact my most recent project was to build an 8-foot left extension table with a 104" Incra track on it to convert the RAS into a crosscutting station - for both length cuts and dados.

As I've written in my profile, I've been a beginning woodworker for 12 years and I figure I'll continue to be a beginning woodworker for another year or two before I become (hopefully), and moderatly skilled intermediate amateur.

So, I've current got in the shop

55-year-old Craftsman RAS - with 80-tooth, thin kerf Freud blade.
12-year-old Ridgid TS2424 - with the same Freud blade,
Harbor Freight 6" joiner (still in the box - just bought it a couple of weeks ago)
HF 2HP dust collector (also still in the box)
HF "smallest DP ever" ($50 item)

Porter-Cable circular saw (I cut panels on the floor with a clamp-on guide)
HF plunge router I picked up for $50 a few weeks ago,
various other hand power tools.

I hope to aquire soon

Bandsaw
Router Table and associated positioning system.
TS fence upgrade
TS miter sled.

OK, that's a long post - better stop.

-Ocelot
Hey welcome to LJ's, you will find this place addicting. But everyone here is ready and willing to give you valuable information when you need it. I think you have a great start on a workshop, I remeber when I moved to South Carolina from Maryland, I sold alot of my fathers/grandfathers tools, ( I was 21 and didnt know better), now wishing I had kept alot of them, if for nothing else, the history of them. But again welcome
 

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Registered
Joined
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11,468 Posts
Starting Point

Hi folks!

From time to time I've read posts on the LJ forum, but this is the first time I've posted, or rather blogged here.

A bit of background about myself. My father was at one time a high-school shop teacher, but for reasons I can only guess (and I have a pretty good guess), he never taught me woodworking - and did little woodworking during the years I grew up. The only shop/stationary power tools that Dad had were a Craftsman, model 100 RAS, dating back to the mid-50's and some kind of 12" planer he picked up used along the way but never bought a motor for. Some years ago, thinking I would never use it, I gave the planer away to my old pastor who had helped me pull a stump. When I went with him to his shop to help him unload it, it turned out that the pastor already had a 20" planer and a 42!!" planer. I'm thinking I may be able to get Dad's old planer back - tho I'm still not sure I'll want it.

My guess at why Dad never taught me woodworking is that Mom probably feared I'd cut off some useful body part (which is a very reasonable fear for any parent). So far I've managed to avoid that.

The 50's model RAS I still have and use, in fact my most recent project was to build an 8-foot left extension table with a 104" Incra track on it to convert the RAS into a crosscutting station - for both length cuts and dados.

As I've written in my profile, I've been a beginning woodworker for 12 years and I figure I'll continue to be a beginning woodworker for another year or two before I become (hopefully), and moderatly skilled intermediate amateur.

So, I've current got in the shop

55-year-old Craftsman RAS - with 80-tooth, thin kerf Freud blade.
12-year-old Ridgid TS2424 - with the same Freud blade,
Harbor Freight 6" joiner (still in the box - just bought it a couple of weeks ago)
HF 2HP dust collector (also still in the box)
HF "smallest DP ever" ($50 item)

Porter-Cable circular saw (I cut panels on the floor with a clamp-on guide)
HF plunge router I picked up for $50 a few weeks ago,
various other hand power tools.

I hope to aquire soon

Bandsaw
Router Table and associated positioning system.
TS fence upgrade
TS miter sled.

OK, that's a long post - better stop.

-Ocelot
Welcome aboard. What condition is the RAS in? I love to see new life brought back into old tools.
 

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Registered
Joined
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817 Posts
Starting Point

Hi folks!

From time to time I've read posts on the LJ forum, but this is the first time I've posted, or rather blogged here.

A bit of background about myself. My father was at one time a high-school shop teacher, but for reasons I can only guess (and I have a pretty good guess), he never taught me woodworking - and did little woodworking during the years I grew up. The only shop/stationary power tools that Dad had were a Craftsman, model 100 RAS, dating back to the mid-50's and some kind of 12" planer he picked up used along the way but never bought a motor for. Some years ago, thinking I would never use it, I gave the planer away to my old pastor who had helped me pull a stump. When I went with him to his shop to help him unload it, it turned out that the pastor already had a 20" planer and a 42!!" planer. I'm thinking I may be able to get Dad's old planer back - tho I'm still not sure I'll want it.

My guess at why Dad never taught me woodworking is that Mom probably feared I'd cut off some useful body part (which is a very reasonable fear for any parent). So far I've managed to avoid that.

The 50's model RAS I still have and use, in fact my most recent project was to build an 8-foot left extension table with a 104" Incra track on it to convert the RAS into a crosscutting station - for both length cuts and dados.

As I've written in my profile, I've been a beginning woodworker for 12 years and I figure I'll continue to be a beginning woodworker for another year or two before I become (hopefully), and moderatly skilled intermediate amateur.

So, I've current got in the shop

55-year-old Craftsman RAS - with 80-tooth, thin kerf Freud blade.
12-year-old Ridgid TS2424 - with the same Freud blade,
Harbor Freight 6" joiner (still in the box - just bought it a couple of weeks ago)
HF 2HP dust collector (also still in the box)
HF "smallest DP ever" ($50 item)

Porter-Cable circular saw (I cut panels on the floor with a clamp-on guide)
HF plunge router I picked up for $50 a few weeks ago,
various other hand power tools.

I hope to aquire soon

Bandsaw
Router Table and associated positioning system.
TS fence upgrade
TS miter sled.

OK, that's a long post - better stop.

-Ocelot
I suggest you consider adding one of these to your DC when you can swing it, unless you plan on venting your DC outside. I would be concerned about breathing air coming out of a 5 micron filter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Starting Point

Hi folks!

From time to time I've read posts on the LJ forum, but this is the first time I've posted, or rather blogged here.

A bit of background about myself. My father was at one time a high-school shop teacher, but for reasons I can only guess (and I have a pretty good guess), he never taught me woodworking - and did little woodworking during the years I grew up. The only shop/stationary power tools that Dad had were a Craftsman, model 100 RAS, dating back to the mid-50's and some kind of 12" planer he picked up used along the way but never bought a motor for. Some years ago, thinking I would never use it, I gave the planer away to my old pastor who had helped me pull a stump. When I went with him to his shop to help him unload it, it turned out that the pastor already had a 20" planer and a 42!!" planer. I'm thinking I may be able to get Dad's old planer back - tho I'm still not sure I'll want it.

My guess at why Dad never taught me woodworking is that Mom probably feared I'd cut off some useful body part (which is a very reasonable fear for any parent). So far I've managed to avoid that.

The 50's model RAS I still have and use, in fact my most recent project was to build an 8-foot left extension table with a 104" Incra track on it to convert the RAS into a crosscutting station - for both length cuts and dados.

As I've written in my profile, I've been a beginning woodworker for 12 years and I figure I'll continue to be a beginning woodworker for another year or two before I become (hopefully), and moderatly skilled intermediate amateur.

So, I've current got in the shop

55-year-old Craftsman RAS - with 80-tooth, thin kerf Freud blade.
12-year-old Ridgid TS2424 - with the same Freud blade,
Harbor Freight 6" joiner (still in the box - just bought it a couple of weeks ago)
HF 2HP dust collector (also still in the box)
HF "smallest DP ever" ($50 item)

Porter-Cable circular saw (I cut panels on the floor with a clamp-on guide)
HF plunge router I picked up for $50 a few weeks ago,
various other hand power tools.

I hope to aquire soon

Bandsaw
Router Table and associated positioning system.
TS fence upgrade
TS miter sled.

OK, that's a long post - better stop.

-Ocelot
Hey Greg,

I've already seen the threads about that, and thought it was a great idea. I'll consider when I've got the thing set up (and have a bandsaw to cut the circular mounting plate.) I may end up building a liittle lean-to or detached shed out back with the DC and air compressor in it. (Hopefully set up so that the compressor doesn't suck in the dust.) In that case, I'll not worry about the diff between 5 micron and 0.5 micron. Heck, I could even just skip the bag and blow the dust out a hole in the back of the shop. There's nobody back there to notice the mess. :)

And right now, I've got no DC at all. Besides, Sam Maloof lived to be 93 and probably didn't have 0.5 micron filters until the last 20 years or so, and I don't plan to spend that much time in the shop.

-Paul
 

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32,187 Posts
Starting Point

Hi folks!

From time to time I've read posts on the LJ forum, but this is the first time I've posted, or rather blogged here.

A bit of background about myself. My father was at one time a high-school shop teacher, but for reasons I can only guess (and I have a pretty good guess), he never taught me woodworking - and did little woodworking during the years I grew up. The only shop/stationary power tools that Dad had were a Craftsman, model 100 RAS, dating back to the mid-50's and some kind of 12" planer he picked up used along the way but never bought a motor for. Some years ago, thinking I would never use it, I gave the planer away to my old pastor who had helped me pull a stump. When I went with him to his shop to help him unload it, it turned out that the pastor already had a 20" planer and a 42!!" planer. I'm thinking I may be able to get Dad's old planer back - tho I'm still not sure I'll want it.

My guess at why Dad never taught me woodworking is that Mom probably feared I'd cut off some useful body part (which is a very reasonable fear for any parent). So far I've managed to avoid that.

The 50's model RAS I still have and use, in fact my most recent project was to build an 8-foot left extension table with a 104" Incra track on it to convert the RAS into a crosscutting station - for both length cuts and dados.

As I've written in my profile, I've been a beginning woodworker for 12 years and I figure I'll continue to be a beginning woodworker for another year or two before I become (hopefully), and moderatly skilled intermediate amateur.

So, I've current got in the shop

55-year-old Craftsman RAS - with 80-tooth, thin kerf Freud blade.
12-year-old Ridgid TS2424 - with the same Freud blade,
Harbor Freight 6" joiner (still in the box - just bought it a couple of weeks ago)
HF 2HP dust collector (also still in the box)
HF "smallest DP ever" ($50 item)

Porter-Cable circular saw (I cut panels on the floor with a clamp-on guide)
HF plunge router I picked up for $50 a few weeks ago,
various other hand power tools.

I hope to aquire soon

Bandsaw
Router Table and associated positioning system.
TS fence upgrade
TS miter sled.

OK, that's a long post - better stop.

-Ocelot
Welcome to Lumberjocks, Ocelot.
 
Joined
·
13,555 Posts
Starting Point

Hi folks!

From time to time I've read posts on the LJ forum, but this is the first time I've posted, or rather blogged here.

A bit of background about myself. My father was at one time a high-school shop teacher, but for reasons I can only guess (and I have a pretty good guess), he never taught me woodworking - and did little woodworking during the years I grew up. The only shop/stationary power tools that Dad had were a Craftsman, model 100 RAS, dating back to the mid-50's and some kind of 12" planer he picked up used along the way but never bought a motor for. Some years ago, thinking I would never use it, I gave the planer away to my old pastor who had helped me pull a stump. When I went with him to his shop to help him unload it, it turned out that the pastor already had a 20" planer and a 42!!" planer. I'm thinking I may be able to get Dad's old planer back - tho I'm still not sure I'll want it.

My guess at why Dad never taught me woodworking is that Mom probably feared I'd cut off some useful body part (which is a very reasonable fear for any parent). So far I've managed to avoid that.

The 50's model RAS I still have and use, in fact my most recent project was to build an 8-foot left extension table with a 104" Incra track on it to convert the RAS into a crosscutting station - for both length cuts and dados.

As I've written in my profile, I've been a beginning woodworker for 12 years and I figure I'll continue to be a beginning woodworker for another year or two before I become (hopefully), and moderatly skilled intermediate amateur.

So, I've current got in the shop

55-year-old Craftsman RAS - with 80-tooth, thin kerf Freud blade.
12-year-old Ridgid TS2424 - with the same Freud blade,
Harbor Freight 6" joiner (still in the box - just bought it a couple of weeks ago)
HF 2HP dust collector (also still in the box)
HF "smallest DP ever" ($50 item)

Porter-Cable circular saw (I cut panels on the floor with a clamp-on guide)
HF plunge router I picked up for $50 a few weeks ago,
various other hand power tools.

I hope to aquire soon

Bandsaw
Router Table and associated positioning system.
TS fence upgrade
TS miter sled.

OK, that's a long post - better stop.

-Ocelot
Congrats,Ocelot. Sounds like you is off to a great start.
 

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3,877 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
RAS side table with Incra Rail and Stop

Over the past couple of weeks, as I've found time, I've built a 8-ft side table for the old Craftsman Radial Arm Saw so that I can easily cut things to length and do crosscut dados. I have a bookcase project that I started before this - during which I realized that before I cut all those dados I need a precision length stop.

A few thoughts (mini-review) on the Incra track.

Had I realized that this is the old-style Incra track (non-flip-stop), I might have considered the newer one, even though it was a bit more expensive.

I bought two 52-inch track sections, one with the "shop stop" included, from Amazon - for about $140 for all. They arrived in good shape without delay.

Each 52-inch track came with 3, 16-inch long sections of plastic scale (nice plastic), marked 16-0, 32-16, 48-32 (from left to right). Since I considered that it would be a nuisance to have the scale start over at 48", I ordered the 96-48 (3 sections of 16" each) directly from Incra. These scale sections are what I consider to be a minor shortcoming of this track system, since you must allign (on a 96" track), 5 joints between the mylar scales - and redo it any time you move the zero point. The instructions for zeroing the stop to the saw suggest that you set the stop in a fixed location, push the stop rod up agaist the saw tooth, then slide the scale to zero. That's not practical with the scale divided into 6 sections which have to be alligned at the ends.

So, I leave the scale where it is and just move the stop rod to the saw tooth to zero it. I can't imagine why they would suggest doing it the other way. It occurs to me that I could just replace the steel stop rod with a piece of wooden dowel (each time I change blades or dado stacks) - and then just clamp the stop at zero on the scale, and cut off the end of the dowel to zero the stop. Probably, that's overkill. I'll just use the steel stop rod for now.

I've already discovered that the stop rod floats a little more than 1/4" off the surface of the table, so that if I cut a 1/4" piece of MDF, the stop rod slips over the top of the piece I'm trying to cut. I just line it up by eye and it seems to be easy to get it dead on.

I'll post photos when I take them. I keep forgetting to take a camera to the shop.

Llimitations of the RAS aside, I already very much like this setup. The limitations are that this RAS has a bit of slop in the column so that I have to square it to the fence with the arm of the saw pushed to the right, and remember to push it to the right before each cut. I'm going to try to figure out where the slop is and see if I can tighten it up, but it seems that the arm moves about a 1/16" at the far end, which is a lot more than I would like. Does anybody know where I can tighten this up?

Oh, and I've discovered that Emerson (manufacturer of this saw for Sears) will give me $100 to scrap it and send them the motor - due to some lawsuit or recall or something. I think I'll keep it, though it has no brake and spins a loooong time when switched off.

Next post will be 1 picture longer and 1000 words shorter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
1961 Craftsman RAS with added crosscut stop rail

Wood Tool Workbench Hardwood Machine tool


Finally, I've pulled the photos from my camera. I neglected to photograph it as I built it, but here it is in finished form. It gives me 8' of stop range for precisely measured crosscuts. I can use it for through cuts as well as crosscut dados. The extension table top and fence are made of a partial sheet of 18mm (3/4") oak veneer plywood that I've had laying around for 10 years or so. The legs are of ordinary 2×4 stud material. There is no finish on it. The stop rail is two 52" sections of Incra rail.

The saw is mounted on a Ridgid universal tool stand. Dad didn't have a stand for it, and had it sitting on various things over the years.

Wood Milling Machine tool Gas Machine


This photo shows the right end of the fence. To the right of the blade, there is a partial spacer fence the same depth as the INCRA rail. The back of INCRA rail is fastened to the fence and the top of the extension table is fastened to the bottom of the INCRA rail.

The fence (sacrificial) of the RAS is clamped between the (wooden) table and a floating partial table at the back of the main table. This is the original table that came with the saw when my Dad bought it back in 1961. It's not so flat, but my feeling so far is that it is usable.

Wood Hardwood Automotive exterior Flooring Wood stain


Under the left front corner of the main table, I've got this little drawlatch which pulls the extension table tight to the main table. Since the back edge of the extension is fastened to the fence, which now extends 8' to the left from the right edge of the main table, I didn't think I needed any further fastening at the back.

Building Wood House Flooring Hardwood


The extension table is supported with two inverted "T" legs which are mounted to door hinges so that the table can be folded for ease of storage or transport when removed from the main saw table. The bottom of each T leg has two "T-bolt" inserts which provide for height adjustment of each corner of the extension table.

Product Wood Building Art Hardwood


Here's a view from upstairs.

Gas Machine tool Engineering Machine Metal


The left side of the saw.

Wood Saw Tool Machine tool Hardwood


Another left angle view.

Property Wood Floor Beam Flooring


This has almost nothing to do with the RAS, but it's the partially floored upstairs of my shop. When I finish this, I can move a lot of stored craft materials (my wife's yarn, fabrics etc.) upstairs to free up space to really get my shop set up. So, finishing that is top shop priority!
 

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1961 Craftsman RAS with added crosscut stop rail

Wood Tool Workbench Hardwood Machine tool


Finally, I've pulled the photos from my camera. I neglected to photograph it as I built it, but here it is in finished form. It gives me 8' of stop range for precisely measured crosscuts. I can use it for through cuts as well as crosscut dados. The extension table top and fence are made of a partial sheet of 18mm (3/4") oak veneer plywood that I've had laying around for 10 years or so. The legs are of ordinary 2×4 stud material. There is no finish on it. The stop rail is two 52" sections of Incra rail.

The saw is mounted on a Ridgid universal tool stand. Dad didn't have a stand for it, and had it sitting on various things over the years.

Wood Milling Machine tool Gas Machine


This photo shows the right end of the fence. To the right of the blade, there is a partial spacer fence the same depth as the INCRA rail. The back of INCRA rail is fastened to the fence and the top of the extension table is fastened to the bottom of the INCRA rail.

The fence (sacrificial) of the RAS is clamped between the (wooden) table and a floating partial table at the back of the main table. This is the original table that came with the saw when my Dad bought it back in 1961. It's not so flat, but my feeling so far is that it is usable.

Wood Hardwood Automotive exterior Flooring Wood stain


Under the left front corner of the main table, I've got this little drawlatch which pulls the extension table tight to the main table. Since the back edge of the extension is fastened to the fence, which now extends 8' to the left from the right edge of the main table, I didn't think I needed any further fastening at the back.

Building Wood House Flooring Hardwood


The extension table is supported with two inverted "T" legs which are mounted to door hinges so that the table can be folded for ease of storage or transport when removed from the main saw table. The bottom of each T leg has two "T-bolt" inserts which provide for height adjustment of each corner of the extension table.

Product Wood Building Art Hardwood


Here's a view from upstairs.

Gas Machine tool Engineering Machine Metal


The left side of the saw.

Wood Saw Tool Machine tool Hardwood


Another left angle view.

Property Wood Floor Beam Flooring


This has almost nothing to do with the RAS, but it's the partially floored upstairs of my shop. When I finish this, I can move a lot of stored craft materials (my wife's yarn, fabrics etc.) upstairs to free up space to really get my shop set up. So, finishing that is top shop priority!
I love the old iron. Nice machine. Nice save. I recently refurbed a drill press that appears to be from that series/era.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
1961 Craftsman RAS with added crosscut stop rail

Wood Tool Workbench Hardwood Machine tool


Finally, I've pulled the photos from my camera. I neglected to photograph it as I built it, but here it is in finished form. It gives me 8' of stop range for precisely measured crosscuts. I can use it for through cuts as well as crosscut dados. The extension table top and fence are made of a partial sheet of 18mm (3/4") oak veneer plywood that I've had laying around for 10 years or so. The legs are of ordinary 2×4 stud material. There is no finish on it. The stop rail is two 52" sections of Incra rail.

The saw is mounted on a Ridgid universal tool stand. Dad didn't have a stand for it, and had it sitting on various things over the years.

Wood Milling Machine tool Gas Machine


This photo shows the right end of the fence. To the right of the blade, there is a partial spacer fence the same depth as the INCRA rail. The back of INCRA rail is fastened to the fence and the top of the extension table is fastened to the bottom of the INCRA rail.

The fence (sacrificial) of the RAS is clamped between the (wooden) table and a floating partial table at the back of the main table. This is the original table that came with the saw when my Dad bought it back in 1961. It's not so flat, but my feeling so far is that it is usable.

Wood Hardwood Automotive exterior Flooring Wood stain


Under the left front corner of the main table, I've got this little drawlatch which pulls the extension table tight to the main table. Since the back edge of the extension is fastened to the fence, which now extends 8' to the left from the right edge of the main table, I didn't think I needed any further fastening at the back.

Building Wood House Flooring Hardwood


The extension table is supported with two inverted "T" legs which are mounted to door hinges so that the table can be folded for ease of storage or transport when removed from the main saw table. The bottom of each T leg has two "T-bolt" inserts which provide for height adjustment of each corner of the extension table.

Product Wood Building Art Hardwood


Here's a view from upstairs.

Gas Machine tool Engineering Machine Metal


The left side of the saw.

Wood Saw Tool Machine tool Hardwood


Another left angle view.

Property Wood Floor Beam Flooring


This has almost nothing to do with the RAS, but it's the partially floored upstairs of my shop. When I finish this, I can move a lot of stored craft materials (my wife's yarn, fabrics etc.) upstairs to free up space to really get my shop set up. So, finishing that is top shop priority!
Thanks for your comments Tedstor. I'd like to see some photos of that drill press.
 

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1961 Craftsman RAS with added crosscut stop rail

Wood Tool Workbench Hardwood Machine tool


Finally, I've pulled the photos from my camera. I neglected to photograph it as I built it, but here it is in finished form. It gives me 8' of stop range for precisely measured crosscuts. I can use it for through cuts as well as crosscut dados. The extension table top and fence are made of a partial sheet of 18mm (3/4") oak veneer plywood that I've had laying around for 10 years or so. The legs are of ordinary 2×4 stud material. There is no finish on it. The stop rail is two 52" sections of Incra rail.

The saw is mounted on a Ridgid universal tool stand. Dad didn't have a stand for it, and had it sitting on various things over the years.

Wood Milling Machine tool Gas Machine


This photo shows the right end of the fence. To the right of the blade, there is a partial spacer fence the same depth as the INCRA rail. The back of INCRA rail is fastened to the fence and the top of the extension table is fastened to the bottom of the INCRA rail.

The fence (sacrificial) of the RAS is clamped between the (wooden) table and a floating partial table at the back of the main table. This is the original table that came with the saw when my Dad bought it back in 1961. It's not so flat, but my feeling so far is that it is usable.

Wood Hardwood Automotive exterior Flooring Wood stain


Under the left front corner of the main table, I've got this little drawlatch which pulls the extension table tight to the main table. Since the back edge of the extension is fastened to the fence, which now extends 8' to the left from the right edge of the main table, I didn't think I needed any further fastening at the back.

Building Wood House Flooring Hardwood


The extension table is supported with two inverted "T" legs which are mounted to door hinges so that the table can be folded for ease of storage or transport when removed from the main saw table. The bottom of each T leg has two "T-bolt" inserts which provide for height adjustment of each corner of the extension table.

Product Wood Building Art Hardwood


Here's a view from upstairs.

Gas Machine tool Engineering Machine Metal


The left side of the saw.

Wood Saw Tool Machine tool Hardwood


Another left angle view.

Property Wood Floor Beam Flooring


This has almost nothing to do with the RAS, but it's the partially floored upstairs of my shop. When I finish this, I can move a lot of stored craft materials (my wife's yarn, fabrics etc.) upstairs to free up space to really get my shop set up. So, finishing that is top shop priority!
Nice looking RAS!
 

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1961 Craftsman RAS with added crosscut stop rail



Finally, I've pulled the photos from my camera. I neglected to photograph it as I built it, but here it is in finished form. It gives me 8' of stop range for precisely measured crosscuts. I can use it for through cuts as well as crosscut dados. The extension table top and fence are made of a partial sheet of 18mm (3/4") oak veneer plywood that I've had laying around for 10 years or so. The legs are of ordinary 2×4 stud material. There is no finish on it. The stop rail is two 52" sections of Incra rail.

The saw is mounted on a Ridgid universal tool stand. Dad didn't have a stand for it, and had it sitting on various things over the years.



This photo shows the right end of the fence. To the right of the blade, there is a partial spacer fence the same depth as the INCRA rail. The back of INCRA rail is fastened to the fence and the top of the extension table is fastened to the bottom of the INCRA rail.

The fence (sacrificial) of the RAS is clamped between the (wooden) table and a floating partial table at the back of the main table. This is the original table that came with the saw when my Dad bought it back in 1961. It's not so flat, but my feeling so far is that it is usable.



Under the left front corner of the main table, I've got this little drawlatch which pulls the extension table tight to the main table. Since the back edge of the extension is fastened to the fence, which now extends 8' to the left from the right edge of the main table, I didn't think I needed any further fastening at the back.

Building Wood House Flooring Hardwood


The extension table is supported with two inverted "T" legs which are mounted to door hinges so that the table can be folded for ease of storage or transport when removed from the main saw table. The bottom of each T leg has two "T-bolt" inserts which provide for height adjustment of each corner of the extension table.

Product Wood Building Art Hardwood


Here's a view from upstairs.

Gas Machine tool Engineering Machine Metal


The left side of the saw.

Wood Saw Tool Machine tool Hardwood


Another left angle view.

Property Wood Floor Beam Flooring


This has almost nothing to do with the RAS, but it's the partially floored upstairs of my shop. When I finish this, I can move a lot of stored craft materials (my wife's yarn, fabrics etc.) upstairs to free up space to really get my shop set up. So, finishing that is top shop priority!
has your saw been painted i just picked up one just like iton CL but in black. also i can't hind any mod #s on mine.looks good!
 

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1961 Craftsman RAS with added crosscut stop rail

Wood Tool Workbench Hardwood Machine tool


Finally, I've pulled the photos from my camera. I neglected to photograph it as I built it, but here it is in finished form. It gives me 8' of stop range for precisely measured crosscuts. I can use it for through cuts as well as crosscut dados. The extension table top and fence are made of a partial sheet of 18mm (3/4") oak veneer plywood that I've had laying around for 10 years or so. The legs are of ordinary 2×4 stud material. There is no finish on it. The stop rail is two 52" sections of Incra rail.

The saw is mounted on a Ridgid universal tool stand. Dad didn't have a stand for it, and had it sitting on various things over the years.

Wood Milling Machine tool Gas Machine


This photo shows the right end of the fence. To the right of the blade, there is a partial spacer fence the same depth as the INCRA rail. The back of INCRA rail is fastened to the fence and the top of the extension table is fastened to the bottom of the INCRA rail.

The fence (sacrificial) of the RAS is clamped between the (wooden) table and a floating partial table at the back of the main table. This is the original table that came with the saw when my Dad bought it back in 1961. It's not so flat, but my feeling so far is that it is usable.

Wood Hardwood Automotive exterior Flooring Wood stain


Under the left front corner of the main table, I've got this little drawlatch which pulls the extension table tight to the main table. Since the back edge of the extension is fastened to the fence, which now extends 8' to the left from the right edge of the main table, I didn't think I needed any further fastening at the back.

Building Wood House Flooring Hardwood


The extension table is supported with two inverted "T" legs which are mounted to door hinges so that the table can be folded for ease of storage or transport when removed from the main saw table. The bottom of each T leg has two "T-bolt" inserts which provide for height adjustment of each corner of the extension table.

Product Wood Building Art Hardwood


Here's a view from upstairs.

Gas Machine tool Engineering Machine Metal


The left side of the saw.

Wood Saw Tool Machine tool Hardwood


Another left angle view.

Property Wood Floor Beam Flooring


This has almost nothing to do with the RAS, but it's the partially floored upstairs of my shop. When I finish this, I can move a lot of stored craft materials (my wife's yarn, fabrics etc.) upstairs to free up space to really get my shop set up. So, finishing that is top shop priority!
Looks like my 58 model except for color. They're good saws even if there mounted to a Ridgid stand. LOL

Nice upper space in the shop, maybe enough room to have a small office even.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
1961 Craftsman RAS with added crosscut stop rail

Wood Tool Workbench Hardwood Machine tool


Finally, I've pulled the photos from my camera. I neglected to photograph it as I built it, but here it is in finished form. It gives me 8' of stop range for precisely measured crosscuts. I can use it for through cuts as well as crosscut dados. The extension table top and fence are made of a partial sheet of 18mm (3/4") oak veneer plywood that I've had laying around for 10 years or so. The legs are of ordinary 2×4 stud material. There is no finish on it. The stop rail is two 52" sections of Incra rail.

The saw is mounted on a Ridgid universal tool stand. Dad didn't have a stand for it, and had it sitting on various things over the years.

Wood Milling Machine tool Gas Machine


This photo shows the right end of the fence. To the right of the blade, there is a partial spacer fence the same depth as the INCRA rail. The back of INCRA rail is fastened to the fence and the top of the extension table is fastened to the bottom of the INCRA rail.

The fence (sacrificial) of the RAS is clamped between the (wooden) table and a floating partial table at the back of the main table. This is the original table that came with the saw when my Dad bought it back in 1961. It's not so flat, but my feeling so far is that it is usable.

Wood Hardwood Automotive exterior Flooring Wood stain


Under the left front corner of the main table, I've got this little drawlatch which pulls the extension table tight to the main table. Since the back edge of the extension is fastened to the fence, which now extends 8' to the left from the right edge of the main table, I didn't think I needed any further fastening at the back.

Building Wood House Flooring Hardwood


The extension table is supported with two inverted "T" legs which are mounted to door hinges so that the table can be folded for ease of storage or transport when removed from the main saw table. The bottom of each T leg has two "T-bolt" inserts which provide for height adjustment of each corner of the extension table.

Product Wood Building Art Hardwood


Here's a view from upstairs.

Gas Machine tool Engineering Machine Metal


The left side of the saw.

Wood Saw Tool Machine tool Hardwood


Another left angle view.

Property Wood Floor Beam Flooring


This has almost nothing to do with the RAS, but it's the partially floored upstairs of my shop. When I finish this, I can move a lot of stored craft materials (my wife's yarn, fabrics etc.) upstairs to free up space to really get my shop set up. So, finishing that is top shop priority!
Gagewestern,

I'm pretty sure mine has not been painted. It's not the sort of thing my Dad would have done. That's the original color.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
1961 Craftsman RAS with added crosscut stop rail

Wood Tool Workbench Hardwood Machine tool


Finally, I've pulled the photos from my camera. I neglected to photograph it as I built it, but here it is in finished form. It gives me 8' of stop range for precisely measured crosscuts. I can use it for through cuts as well as crosscut dados. The extension table top and fence are made of a partial sheet of 18mm (3/4") oak veneer plywood that I've had laying around for 10 years or so. The legs are of ordinary 2×4 stud material. There is no finish on it. The stop rail is two 52" sections of Incra rail.

The saw is mounted on a Ridgid universal tool stand. Dad didn't have a stand for it, and had it sitting on various things over the years.

Wood Milling Machine tool Gas Machine


This photo shows the right end of the fence. To the right of the blade, there is a partial spacer fence the same depth as the INCRA rail. The back of INCRA rail is fastened to the fence and the top of the extension table is fastened to the bottom of the INCRA rail.

The fence (sacrificial) of the RAS is clamped between the (wooden) table and a floating partial table at the back of the main table. This is the original table that came with the saw when my Dad bought it back in 1961. It's not so flat, but my feeling so far is that it is usable.

Wood Hardwood Automotive exterior Flooring Wood stain


Under the left front corner of the main table, I've got this little drawlatch which pulls the extension table tight to the main table. Since the back edge of the extension is fastened to the fence, which now extends 8' to the left from the right edge of the main table, I didn't think I needed any further fastening at the back.

Building Wood House Flooring Hardwood


The extension table is supported with two inverted "T" legs which are mounted to door hinges so that the table can be folded for ease of storage or transport when removed from the main saw table. The bottom of each T leg has two "T-bolt" inserts which provide for height adjustment of each corner of the extension table.

Product Wood Building Art Hardwood


Here's a view from upstairs.

Gas Machine tool Engineering Machine Metal


The left side of the saw.

Wood Saw Tool Machine tool Hardwood


Another left angle view.

Property Wood Floor Beam Flooring


This has almost nothing to do with the RAS, but it's the partially floored upstairs of my shop. When I finish this, I can move a lot of stored craft materials (my wife's yarn, fabrics etc.) upstairs to free up space to really get my shop set up. So, finishing that is top shop priority!
Gregn,

I suppose I could paint over the "Ridgid" sign, or maybe it's stuck on there someway where I can take it off. I never thought about it. I'll have to take a look.
 

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1961 Craftsman RAS with added crosscut stop rail

Wood Tool Workbench Hardwood Machine tool


Finally, I've pulled the photos from my camera. I neglected to photograph it as I built it, but here it is in finished form. It gives me 8' of stop range for precisely measured crosscuts. I can use it for through cuts as well as crosscut dados. The extension table top and fence are made of a partial sheet of 18mm (3/4") oak veneer plywood that I've had laying around for 10 years or so. The legs are of ordinary 2×4 stud material. There is no finish on it. The stop rail is two 52" sections of Incra rail.

The saw is mounted on a Ridgid universal tool stand. Dad didn't have a stand for it, and had it sitting on various things over the years.

Wood Milling Machine tool Gas Machine


This photo shows the right end of the fence. To the right of the blade, there is a partial spacer fence the same depth as the INCRA rail. The back of INCRA rail is fastened to the fence and the top of the extension table is fastened to the bottom of the INCRA rail.

The fence (sacrificial) of the RAS is clamped between the (wooden) table and a floating partial table at the back of the main table. This is the original table that came with the saw when my Dad bought it back in 1961. It's not so flat, but my feeling so far is that it is usable.

Wood Hardwood Automotive exterior Flooring Wood stain


Under the left front corner of the main table, I've got this little drawlatch which pulls the extension table tight to the main table. Since the back edge of the extension is fastened to the fence, which now extends 8' to the left from the right edge of the main table, I didn't think I needed any further fastening at the back.

Building Wood House Flooring Hardwood


The extension table is supported with two inverted "T" legs which are mounted to door hinges so that the table can be folded for ease of storage or transport when removed from the main saw table. The bottom of each T leg has two "T-bolt" inserts which provide for height adjustment of each corner of the extension table.

Product Wood Building Art Hardwood


Here's a view from upstairs.

Gas Machine tool Engineering Machine Metal


The left side of the saw.

Wood Saw Tool Machine tool Hardwood


Another left angle view.

Property Wood Floor Beam Flooring


This has almost nothing to do with the RAS, but it's the partially floored upstairs of my shop. When I finish this, I can move a lot of stored craft materials (my wife's yarn, fabrics etc.) upstairs to free up space to really get my shop set up. So, finishing that is top shop priority!
I'm not sure but I think different years had used different colors much like Shop Smith and other manufactures. Mine is machinery gray. Thats pretty cool that it was your Dads RAS, mine was bought used, although I do have some tools that were my grandfathers and from dear departed friends. Its kinda like they are there in the shop with me.
 

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1961 Craftsman RAS with added crosscut stop rail

Wood Tool Workbench Hardwood Machine tool


Finally, I've pulled the photos from my camera. I neglected to photograph it as I built it, but here it is in finished form. It gives me 8' of stop range for precisely measured crosscuts. I can use it for through cuts as well as crosscut dados. The extension table top and fence are made of a partial sheet of 18mm (3/4") oak veneer plywood that I've had laying around for 10 years or so. The legs are of ordinary 2×4 stud material. There is no finish on it. The stop rail is two 52" sections of Incra rail.

The saw is mounted on a Ridgid universal tool stand. Dad didn't have a stand for it, and had it sitting on various things over the years.

Wood Milling Machine tool Gas Machine


This photo shows the right end of the fence. To the right of the blade, there is a partial spacer fence the same depth as the INCRA rail. The back of INCRA rail is fastened to the fence and the top of the extension table is fastened to the bottom of the INCRA rail.

The fence (sacrificial) of the RAS is clamped between the (wooden) table and a floating partial table at the back of the main table. This is the original table that came with the saw when my Dad bought it back in 1961. It's not so flat, but my feeling so far is that it is usable.

Wood Hardwood Automotive exterior Flooring Wood stain


Under the left front corner of the main table, I've got this little drawlatch which pulls the extension table tight to the main table. Since the back edge of the extension is fastened to the fence, which now extends 8' to the left from the right edge of the main table, I didn't think I needed any further fastening at the back.

Building Wood House Flooring Hardwood


The extension table is supported with two inverted "T" legs which are mounted to door hinges so that the table can be folded for ease of storage or transport when removed from the main saw table. The bottom of each T leg has two "T-bolt" inserts which provide for height adjustment of each corner of the extension table.

Product Wood Building Art Hardwood


Here's a view from upstairs.

Gas Machine tool Engineering Machine Metal


The left side of the saw.

Wood Saw Tool Machine tool Hardwood


Another left angle view.

Property Wood Floor Beam Flooring


This has almost nothing to do with the RAS, but it's the partially floored upstairs of my shop. When I finish this, I can move a lot of stored craft materials (my wife's yarn, fabrics etc.) upstairs to free up space to really get my shop set up. So, finishing that is top shop priority!
Ocelot, I was just pulling on your chain. Whatever works is all that matters. I do plan on taking mine off the stand and mounting it in a bench type system, due to my new shop is narrower than my last shop even though the sq.footage is almost the same.
 

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