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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Endgrain Flooring (Cobblewood)

NOTE TO THOSE WHO WANT TO DO THIS…
Please don't use regular grout like me. The wood shrinks slightly and is allowed to move because of the urethane adhesive remaining pliable. There's tiny little cracks where the wood has separated on the outer tiles in the room. It's not going to weather well, so I'm replacing the grout in the near future. Thank goodness endgrain floors are cheap material cost. :) Everything else I did was fine, but the grout was an experiment that proved bad. I'll leave this project here so you can see it, but be warned - I have now decided to try other grout mixes using flexible wood filler or epoxy/resin/sawdust mixes.


About 4 years ago I did the entire 1st floor of my condo in redwood endgrain. It was time consuming, difficult, aggravating, and one of the most fun projects I've ever done. I have decided to take you guys through a step by step journey as I do a new endgrain floor in my house. I'm going to start with one room at a time and take you through the process of building the floor from scratch. I'll also throw in some of the information I've found about end grain flooring as I go along. Once the project is finished, I'll compile a video of it all so you can see it in a compressed time lapsed way. Until that day… you'll have do do with pictures and wordy paragraphs as I try and test some of the new ways I've devised to make this floor happen in a more efficient manor than the first time I did it. If you want to see the floor I did before please look at my projects gallery. It's in there.

I just started the tear down process of the room. I took out al the furniture. I removed the carpet, tack strips and junk on the floor. Now I'm going to clean it off and begin preparing the subfloor. Here's where I'm at… These will serve as the "before" pictures…




 

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Endgrain Flooring (Cobblewood)

NOTE TO THOSE WHO WANT TO DO THIS…
Please don't use regular grout like me. The wood shrinks slightly and is allowed to move because of the urethane adhesive remaining pliable. There's tiny little cracks where the wood has separated on the outer tiles in the room. It's not going to weather well, so I'm replacing the grout in the near future. Thank goodness endgrain floors are cheap material cost. :) Everything else I did was fine, but the grout was an experiment that proved bad. I'll leave this project here so you can see it, but be warned - I have now decided to try other grout mixes using flexible wood filler or epoxy/resin/sawdust mixes.


About 4 years ago I did the entire 1st floor of my condo in redwood endgrain. It was time consuming, difficult, aggravating, and one of the most fun projects I've ever done. I have decided to take you guys through a step by step journey as I do a new endgrain floor in my house. I'm going to start with one room at a time and take you through the process of building the floor from scratch. I'll also throw in some of the information I've found about end grain flooring as I go along. Once the project is finished, I'll compile a video of it all so you can see it in a compressed time lapsed way. Until that day… you'll have do do with pictures and wordy paragraphs as I try and test some of the new ways I've devised to make this floor happen in a more efficient manor than the first time I did it. If you want to see the floor I did before please look at my projects gallery. It's in there.

I just started the tear down process of the room. I took out al the furniture. I removed the carpet, tack strips and junk on the floor. Now I'm going to clean it off and begin preparing the subfloor. Here's where I'm at… These will serve as the "before" pictures…




Neat idea. I watched a show on one of the home improvement channels a few years ago that featured an end grain floor done with small slabs of tree limbs of various diameters. If memory serves they used oak grown on their property.
 

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Endgrain Flooring (Cobblewood)

NOTE TO THOSE WHO WANT TO DO THIS…
Please don't use regular grout like me. The wood shrinks slightly and is allowed to move because of the urethane adhesive remaining pliable. There's tiny little cracks where the wood has separated on the outer tiles in the room. It's not going to weather well, so I'm replacing the grout in the near future. Thank goodness endgrain floors are cheap material cost. :) Everything else I did was fine, but the grout was an experiment that proved bad. I'll leave this project here so you can see it, but be warned - I have now decided to try other grout mixes using flexible wood filler or epoxy/resin/sawdust mixes.


About 4 years ago I did the entire 1st floor of my condo in redwood endgrain. It was time consuming, difficult, aggravating, and one of the most fun projects I've ever done. I have decided to take you guys through a step by step journey as I do a new endgrain floor in my house. I'm going to start with one room at a time and take you through the process of building the floor from scratch. I'll also throw in some of the information I've found about end grain flooring as I go along. Once the project is finished, I'll compile a video of it all so you can see it in a compressed time lapsed way. Until that day… you'll have do do with pictures and wordy paragraphs as I try and test some of the new ways I've devised to make this floor happen in a more efficient manor than the first time I did it. If you want to see the floor I did before please look at my projects gallery. It's in there.

I just started the tear down process of the room. I took out al the furniture. I removed the carpet, tack strips and junk on the floor. Now I'm going to clean it off and begin preparing the subfloor. Here's where I'm at… These will serve as the "before" pictures…




I'm looking forward to this! I want to do my foyer in end grain mesquite , border with another species.
 

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Endgrain Flooring (Cobblewood)

NOTE TO THOSE WHO WANT TO DO THIS…
Please don't use regular grout like me. The wood shrinks slightly and is allowed to move because of the urethane adhesive remaining pliable. There's tiny little cracks where the wood has separated on the outer tiles in the room. It's not going to weather well, so I'm replacing the grout in the near future. Thank goodness endgrain floors are cheap material cost. :) Everything else I did was fine, but the grout was an experiment that proved bad. I'll leave this project here so you can see it, but be warned - I have now decided to try other grout mixes using flexible wood filler or epoxy/resin/sawdust mixes.


About 4 years ago I did the entire 1st floor of my condo in redwood endgrain. It was time consuming, difficult, aggravating, and one of the most fun projects I've ever done. I have decided to take you guys through a step by step journey as I do a new endgrain floor in my house. I'm going to start with one room at a time and take you through the process of building the floor from scratch. I'll also throw in some of the information I've found about end grain flooring as I go along. Once the project is finished, I'll compile a video of it all so you can see it in a compressed time lapsed way. Until that day… you'll have do do with pictures and wordy paragraphs as I try and test some of the new ways I've devised to make this floor happen in a more efficient manor than the first time I did it. If you want to see the floor I did before please look at my projects gallery. It's in there.

I just started the tear down process of the room. I took out al the furniture. I removed the carpet, tack strips and junk on the floor. Now I'm going to clean it off and begin preparing the subfloor. Here's where I'm at… These will serve as the "before" pictures…




I enjoy doing flooring. It is such a dramatic way of changing the rooms appearance. This is going to be an interesting post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Endgrain Flooring (Cobblewood)

NOTE TO THOSE WHO WANT TO DO THIS…
Please don't use regular grout like me. The wood shrinks slightly and is allowed to move because of the urethane adhesive remaining pliable. There's tiny little cracks where the wood has separated on the outer tiles in the room. It's not going to weather well, so I'm replacing the grout in the near future. Thank goodness endgrain floors are cheap material cost. :) Everything else I did was fine, but the grout was an experiment that proved bad. I'll leave this project here so you can see it, but be warned - I have now decided to try other grout mixes using flexible wood filler or epoxy/resin/sawdust mixes.


About 4 years ago I did the entire 1st floor of my condo in redwood endgrain. It was time consuming, difficult, aggravating, and one of the most fun projects I've ever done. I have decided to take you guys through a step by step journey as I do a new endgrain floor in my house. I'm going to start with one room at a time and take you through the process of building the floor from scratch. I'll also throw in some of the information I've found about end grain flooring as I go along. Once the project is finished, I'll compile a video of it all so you can see it in a compressed time lapsed way. Until that day… you'll have do do with pictures and wordy paragraphs as I try and test some of the new ways I've devised to make this floor happen in a more efficient manor than the first time I did it. If you want to see the floor I did before please look at my projects gallery. It's in there.

I just started the tear down process of the room. I took out al the furniture. I removed the carpet, tack strips and junk on the floor. Now I'm going to clean it off and begin preparing the subfloor. Here's where I'm at… These will serve as the "before" pictures…




Wow… mesquite. That would be fun. You'd go through a couple of blades that's for sure. I'll be making about 900 cuts on the tablesaw to make enough pieces for this 160 sq ft. room alone. I did over 12,000 cuts on the condo project I did. I'm using Douglas Fir for this one. I used Redwood for the last one. I can't imagine what hardwood like mesquite would be like, but one things for certain…. it would be gorgeous.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Buying the Materials

NOTE TO THOSE WHO WANT TO DO THIS…
Please don't use regular grout like me. The wood shrinks slightly and is allowed to move because of the urethane adhesive remaining pliable. There's tiny little cracks where the wood has separated on the outer tiles in the room. It's not going to weather well, so I'm replacing the grout in the near future. Thank goodness endgrain floors are cheap material cost. :) Everything else I did was fine, but the grout was an experiment that proved bad. I'll leave this project here so you can see it, but be warned - I have now decided to try other grout mixes using flexible wood filler or epoxy/resin/sawdust mixes.


I went and picked up a bunch of stuff from Home Depot the other day. I love the fact that I get to buy crappy lumber. Usually I blow lots of money on exotics or quality domestic hardwoods. Picking up a bunch of Douglas Fir beams is cheap. They were $19 a piece for 12' beams of 4×8 (actual size 3.5"x7.5").

I also picked up some polyethelene moisture barrier and tongue and groove douglas fir plywood (22/32"). This is what I'll be using for the subfloor. I installed the polyethelene and the subloor that afternoon. It's a quick job… cutting the subfloor with a skill saw with about a quarter inch of fudge room. Subfloors don't have to be perfect. They just need to be flat. Here's where I was at the other day…




 

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Buying the Materials

NOTE TO THOSE WHO WANT TO DO THIS…
Please don't use regular grout like me. The wood shrinks slightly and is allowed to move because of the urethane adhesive remaining pliable. There's tiny little cracks where the wood has separated on the outer tiles in the room. It's not going to weather well, so I'm replacing the grout in the near future. Thank goodness endgrain floors are cheap material cost. :) Everything else I did was fine, but the grout was an experiment that proved bad. I'll leave this project here so you can see it, but be warned - I have now decided to try other grout mixes using flexible wood filler or epoxy/resin/sawdust mixes.


I went and picked up a bunch of stuff from Home Depot the other day. I love the fact that I get to buy crappy lumber. Usually I blow lots of money on exotics or quality domestic hardwoods. Picking up a bunch of Douglas Fir beams is cheap. They were $19 a piece for 12' beams of 4×8 (actual size 3.5"x7.5").

I also picked up some polyethelene moisture barrier and tongue and groove douglas fir plywood (22/32"). This is what I'll be using for the subfloor. I installed the polyethelene and the subloor that afternoon. It's a quick job… cutting the subfloor with a skill saw with about a quarter inch of fudge room. Subfloors don't have to be perfect. They just need to be flat. Here's where I was at the other day…




Thomas,

You have a good start on this project. This is going to be an interesting project.
 

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Buying the Materials

NOTE TO THOSE WHO WANT TO DO THIS…
Please don't use regular grout like me. The wood shrinks slightly and is allowed to move because of the urethane adhesive remaining pliable. There's tiny little cracks where the wood has separated on the outer tiles in the room. It's not going to weather well, so I'm replacing the grout in the near future. Thank goodness endgrain floors are cheap material cost. :) Everything else I did was fine, but the grout was an experiment that proved bad. I'll leave this project here so you can see it, but be warned - I have now decided to try other grout mixes using flexible wood filler or epoxy/resin/sawdust mixes.


I went and picked up a bunch of stuff from Home Depot the other day. I love the fact that I get to buy crappy lumber. Usually I blow lots of money on exotics or quality domestic hardwoods. Picking up a bunch of Douglas Fir beams is cheap. They were $19 a piece for 12' beams of 4×8 (actual size 3.5"x7.5").

I also picked up some polyethelene moisture barrier and tongue and groove douglas fir plywood (22/32"). This is what I'll be using for the subfloor. I installed the polyethelene and the subloor that afternoon. It's a quick job… cutting the subfloor with a skill saw with about a quarter inch of fudge room. Subfloors don't have to be perfect. They just need to be flat. Here's where I was at the other day…




Is the sub floor floating or attached? Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Buying the Materials

NOTE TO THOSE WHO WANT TO DO THIS…
Please don't use regular grout like me. The wood shrinks slightly and is allowed to move because of the urethane adhesive remaining pliable. There's tiny little cracks where the wood has separated on the outer tiles in the room. It's not going to weather well, so I'm replacing the grout in the near future. Thank goodness endgrain floors are cheap material cost. :) Everything else I did was fine, but the grout was an experiment that proved bad. I'll leave this project here so you can see it, but be warned - I have now decided to try other grout mixes using flexible wood filler or epoxy/resin/sawdust mixes.


I went and picked up a bunch of stuff from Home Depot the other day. I love the fact that I get to buy crappy lumber. Usually I blow lots of money on exotics or quality domestic hardwoods. Picking up a bunch of Douglas Fir beams is cheap. They were $19 a piece for 12' beams of 4×8 (actual size 3.5"x7.5").

I also picked up some polyethelene moisture barrier and tongue and groove douglas fir plywood (22/32"). This is what I'll be using for the subfloor. I installed the polyethelene and the subloor that afternoon. It's a quick job… cutting the subfloor with a skill saw with about a quarter inch of fudge room. Subfloors don't have to be perfect. They just need to be flat. Here's where I was at the other day…




Yes, the subfloor is nailed in using masonry nails.
 

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Buying the Materials

NOTE TO THOSE WHO WANT TO DO THIS…
Please don't use regular grout like me. The wood shrinks slightly and is allowed to move because of the urethane adhesive remaining pliable. There's tiny little cracks where the wood has separated on the outer tiles in the room. It's not going to weather well, so I'm replacing the grout in the near future. Thank goodness endgrain floors are cheap material cost. :) Everything else I did was fine, but the grout was an experiment that proved bad. I'll leave this project here so you can see it, but be warned - I have now decided to try other grout mixes using flexible wood filler or epoxy/resin/sawdust mixes.


I went and picked up a bunch of stuff from Home Depot the other day. I love the fact that I get to buy crappy lumber. Usually I blow lots of money on exotics or quality domestic hardwoods. Picking up a bunch of Douglas Fir beams is cheap. They were $19 a piece for 12' beams of 4×8 (actual size 3.5"x7.5").

I also picked up some polyethelene moisture barrier and tongue and groove douglas fir plywood (22/32"). This is what I'll be using for the subfloor. I installed the polyethelene and the subloor that afternoon. It's a quick job… cutting the subfloor with a skill saw with about a quarter inch of fudge room. Subfloors don't have to be perfect. They just need to be flat. Here's where I was at the other day…




I look forward to seeing the finished project. Don't forget to stagger the seams of the subflooring, it adds strength to the floor and can help prevent future problems in case of movement.
 

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Buying the Materials

NOTE TO THOSE WHO WANT TO DO THIS…
Please don't use regular grout like me. The wood shrinks slightly and is allowed to move because of the urethane adhesive remaining pliable. There's tiny little cracks where the wood has separated on the outer tiles in the room. It's not going to weather well, so I'm replacing the grout in the near future. Thank goodness endgrain floors are cheap material cost. :) Everything else I did was fine, but the grout was an experiment that proved bad. I'll leave this project here so you can see it, but be warned - I have now decided to try other grout mixes using flexible wood filler or epoxy/resin/sawdust mixes.


I went and picked up a bunch of stuff from Home Depot the other day. I love the fact that I get to buy crappy lumber. Usually I blow lots of money on exotics or quality domestic hardwoods. Picking up a bunch of Douglas Fir beams is cheap. They were $19 a piece for 12' beams of 4×8 (actual size 3.5"x7.5").

I also picked up some polyethelene moisture barrier and tongue and groove douglas fir plywood (22/32"). This is what I'll be using for the subfloor. I installed the polyethelene and the subloor that afternoon. It's a quick job… cutting the subfloor with a skill saw with about a quarter inch of fudge room. Subfloors don't have to be perfect. They just need to be flat. Here's where I was at the other day…




Interesting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Buying the Materials

NOTE TO THOSE WHO WANT TO DO THIS…
Please don't use regular grout like me. The wood shrinks slightly and is allowed to move because of the urethane adhesive remaining pliable. There's tiny little cracks where the wood has separated on the outer tiles in the room. It's not going to weather well, so I'm replacing the grout in the near future. Thank goodness endgrain floors are cheap material cost. :) Everything else I did was fine, but the grout was an experiment that proved bad. I'll leave this project here so you can see it, but be warned - I have now decided to try other grout mixes using flexible wood filler or epoxy/resin/sawdust mixes.


I went and picked up a bunch of stuff from Home Depot the other day. I love the fact that I get to buy crappy lumber. Usually I blow lots of money on exotics or quality domestic hardwoods. Picking up a bunch of Douglas Fir beams is cheap. They were $19 a piece for 12' beams of 4×8 (actual size 3.5"x7.5").

I also picked up some polyethelene moisture barrier and tongue and groove douglas fir plywood (22/32"). This is what I'll be using for the subfloor. I installed the polyethelene and the subloor that afternoon. It's a quick job… cutting the subfloor with a skill saw with about a quarter inch of fudge room. Subfloors don't have to be perfect. They just need to be flat. Here's where I was at the other day…




Too late on the staggering subfloor idea, but it's a good one. I don't think I'll have much problem with it since it's such a small room and since it's so dry in Arizona, but you never know. It's anchored really well so it's very unlikely that it will move at all. There's more pictures and stuff coming soon I promise. I haven't dowloaded the images from the camera yet, but I just finished sanding/staining the floor and I'm about to polyurethane it and grout it. Not much longer and I'll have a finished project! Woo hoo!
 

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Buying the Materials

NOTE TO THOSE WHO WANT TO DO THIS…
Please don't use regular grout like me. The wood shrinks slightly and is allowed to move because of the urethane adhesive remaining pliable. There's tiny little cracks where the wood has separated on the outer tiles in the room. It's not going to weather well, so I'm replacing the grout in the near future. Thank goodness endgrain floors are cheap material cost. :) Everything else I did was fine, but the grout was an experiment that proved bad. I'll leave this project here so you can see it, but be warned - I have now decided to try other grout mixes using flexible wood filler or epoxy/resin/sawdust mixes.


I went and picked up a bunch of stuff from Home Depot the other day. I love the fact that I get to buy crappy lumber. Usually I blow lots of money on exotics or quality domestic hardwoods. Picking up a bunch of Douglas Fir beams is cheap. They were $19 a piece for 12' beams of 4×8 (actual size 3.5"x7.5").

I also picked up some polyethelene moisture barrier and tongue and groove douglas fir plywood (22/32"). This is what I'll be using for the subfloor. I installed the polyethelene and the subloor that afternoon. It's a quick job… cutting the subfloor with a skill saw with about a quarter inch of fudge room. Subfloors don't have to be perfect. They just need to be flat. Here's where I was at the other day…




Did you use the 22/32" fir plywood as a subfloor or an underlay over your existing subfloor? Would a 1$ underlay be enough?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Getting things going...

NOTE TO THOSE WHO WANT TO DO THIS…
Please don't use regular grout like me. The wood shrinks slightly and is allowed to move because of the urethane adhesive remaining pliable. There's tiny little cracks where the wood has separated on the outer tiles in the room. It's not going to weather well, so I'm replacing the grout in the near future. Thank goodness endgrain floors are cheap material cost. :) Everything else I did was fine, but the grout was an experiment that proved bad. I'll leave this project here so you can see it, but be warned - I have now decided to try other grout mixes using flexible wood filler or epoxy/resin/sawdust mixes.


So now it's time to do all the cutting and laying and cutting and laying and cutting and…. well you get the idea. This room will use somewhere near 800 tiles to cover the entire floor. That means cutting up about 10-12 beams depending on how far down the beam and how many pieces get damaged. Sometimes there are cracks and the pieces can only be used as half pieces for custom cuts later on. I leave about 20% more than i need just incase. You can never have too much wood right?

I worked for about 10 hours strait getting lots of stuff done. I went and picked up the mastic and some other finishing materials at Home Depot. I came home and got started nailing the subfloor down and securing it to the concrete. Then I started the cutting and hauling in the tiles. With out going into great detail here's the progress. Give me questions in the comments and I'll answer. This shows you the stop I made on the table saw out of a piece of scrap thermofuse and how I put 3 beams at a time on the sliding table to speed things up. Here's a note however… if your table saw can't cut 4×8 beams in one pass… you're in for a lot more work than you know. Make sure if you're going to attempt an endgrain floor that you think through all of the processes before buying the lumber. My saw will cut up to around 5" tall. Most tablesaws cannot. So here's where I'm at. I'm almost done laying all of the tiles now but I ran out of mastic and I need to make a supply run tomorrow. Here's the pics…



















 

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Getting things going...

NOTE TO THOSE WHO WANT TO DO THIS…
Please don't use regular grout like me. The wood shrinks slightly and is allowed to move because of the urethane adhesive remaining pliable. There's tiny little cracks where the wood has separated on the outer tiles in the room. It's not going to weather well, so I'm replacing the grout in the near future. Thank goodness endgrain floors are cheap material cost. :) Everything else I did was fine, but the grout was an experiment that proved bad. I'll leave this project here so you can see it, but be warned - I have now decided to try other grout mixes using flexible wood filler or epoxy/resin/sawdust mixes.


So now it's time to do all the cutting and laying and cutting and laying and cutting and…. well you get the idea. This room will use somewhere near 800 tiles to cover the entire floor. That means cutting up about 10-12 beams depending on how far down the beam and how many pieces get damaged. Sometimes there are cracks and the pieces can only be used as half pieces for custom cuts later on. I leave about 20% more than i need just incase. You can never have too much wood right?

I worked for about 10 hours strait getting lots of stuff done. I went and picked up the mastic and some other finishing materials at Home Depot. I came home and got started nailing the subfloor down and securing it to the concrete. Then I started the cutting and hauling in the tiles. With out going into great detail here's the progress. Give me questions in the comments and I'll answer. This shows you the stop I made on the table saw out of a piece of scrap thermofuse and how I put 3 beams at a time on the sliding table to speed things up. Here's a note however… if your table saw can't cut 4×8 beams in one pass… you're in for a lot more work than you know. Make sure if you're going to attempt an endgrain floor that you think through all of the processes before buying the lumber. My saw will cut up to around 5" tall. Most tablesaws cannot. So here's where I'm at. I'm almost done laying all of the tiles now but I ran out of mastic and I need to make a supply run tomorrow. Here's the pics…



















Thomas,

This is very interesting series and a unique floor. I would assume that you are cutting these to 3/4" but in the pictures the tiles just appear to be thicker.

Very nice.
 

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Getting things going...

NOTE TO THOSE WHO WANT TO DO THIS…
Please don't use regular grout like me. The wood shrinks slightly and is allowed to move because of the urethane adhesive remaining pliable. There's tiny little cracks where the wood has separated on the outer tiles in the room. It's not going to weather well, so I'm replacing the grout in the near future. Thank goodness endgrain floors are cheap material cost. :) Everything else I did was fine, but the grout was an experiment that proved bad. I'll leave this project here so you can see it, but be warned - I have now decided to try other grout mixes using flexible wood filler or epoxy/resin/sawdust mixes.


So now it's time to do all the cutting and laying and cutting and laying and cutting and…. well you get the idea. This room will use somewhere near 800 tiles to cover the entire floor. That means cutting up about 10-12 beams depending on how far down the beam and how many pieces get damaged. Sometimes there are cracks and the pieces can only be used as half pieces for custom cuts later on. I leave about 20% more than i need just incase. You can never have too much wood right?

I worked for about 10 hours strait getting lots of stuff done. I went and picked up the mastic and some other finishing materials at Home Depot. I came home and got started nailing the subfloor down and securing it to the concrete. Then I started the cutting and hauling in the tiles. With out going into great detail here's the progress. Give me questions in the comments and I'll answer. This shows you the stop I made on the table saw out of a piece of scrap thermofuse and how I put 3 beams at a time on the sliding table to speed things up. Here's a note however… if your table saw can't cut 4×8 beams in one pass… you're in for a lot more work than you know. Make sure if you're going to attempt an endgrain floor that you think through all of the processes before buying the lumber. My saw will cut up to around 5" tall. Most tablesaws cannot. So here's where I'm at. I'm almost done laying all of the tiles now but I ran out of mastic and I need to make a supply run tomorrow. Here's the pics…



















I like it, and your monster saw.

Questions:
  • Why didn't you remove the baseboard?
  • Why did you need a new subfloor, wasn't there one already?

Thanks man!
 

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Getting things going...

NOTE TO THOSE WHO WANT TO DO THIS…
Please don't use regular grout like me. The wood shrinks slightly and is allowed to move because of the urethane adhesive remaining pliable. There's tiny little cracks where the wood has separated on the outer tiles in the room. It's not going to weather well, so I'm replacing the grout in the near future. Thank goodness endgrain floors are cheap material cost. :) Everything else I did was fine, but the grout was an experiment that proved bad. I'll leave this project here so you can see it, but be warned - I have now decided to try other grout mixes using flexible wood filler or epoxy/resin/sawdust mixes.


So now it's time to do all the cutting and laying and cutting and laying and cutting and…. well you get the idea. This room will use somewhere near 800 tiles to cover the entire floor. That means cutting up about 10-12 beams depending on how far down the beam and how many pieces get damaged. Sometimes there are cracks and the pieces can only be used as half pieces for custom cuts later on. I leave about 20% more than i need just incase. You can never have too much wood right?

I worked for about 10 hours strait getting lots of stuff done. I went and picked up the mastic and some other finishing materials at Home Depot. I came home and got started nailing the subfloor down and securing it to the concrete. Then I started the cutting and hauling in the tiles. With out going into great detail here's the progress. Give me questions in the comments and I'll answer. This shows you the stop I made on the table saw out of a piece of scrap thermofuse and how I put 3 beams at a time on the sliding table to speed things up. Here's a note however… if your table saw can't cut 4×8 beams in one pass… you're in for a lot more work than you know. Make sure if you're going to attempt an endgrain floor that you think through all of the processes before buying the lumber. My saw will cut up to around 5" tall. Most tablesaws cannot. So here's where I'm at. I'm almost done laying all of the tiles now but I ran out of mastic and I need to make a supply run tomorrow. Here's the pics…



















Looks fantastic. What do you use to fill the 'grout' lines? I'm sure you have enough sawdust from all that cutting to fill the voids. What finish do you apply to the floor?
 

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Getting things going...

NOTE TO THOSE WHO WANT TO DO THIS…
Please don't use regular grout like me. The wood shrinks slightly and is allowed to move because of the urethane adhesive remaining pliable. There's tiny little cracks where the wood has separated on the outer tiles in the room. It's not going to weather well, so I'm replacing the grout in the near future. Thank goodness endgrain floors are cheap material cost. :) Everything else I did was fine, but the grout was an experiment that proved bad. I'll leave this project here so you can see it, but be warned - I have now decided to try other grout mixes using flexible wood filler or epoxy/resin/sawdust mixes.


So now it's time to do all the cutting and laying and cutting and laying and cutting and…. well you get the idea. This room will use somewhere near 800 tiles to cover the entire floor. That means cutting up about 10-12 beams depending on how far down the beam and how many pieces get damaged. Sometimes there are cracks and the pieces can only be used as half pieces for custom cuts later on. I leave about 20% more than i need just incase. You can never have too much wood right?

I worked for about 10 hours strait getting lots of stuff done. I went and picked up the mastic and some other finishing materials at Home Depot. I came home and got started nailing the subfloor down and securing it to the concrete. Then I started the cutting and hauling in the tiles. With out going into great detail here's the progress. Give me questions in the comments and I'll answer. This shows you the stop I made on the table saw out of a piece of scrap thermofuse and how I put 3 beams at a time on the sliding table to speed things up. Here's a note however… if your table saw can't cut 4×8 beams in one pass… you're in for a lot more work than you know. Make sure if you're going to attempt an endgrain floor that you think through all of the processes before buying the lumber. My saw will cut up to around 5" tall. Most tablesaws cannot. So here's where I'm at. I'm almost done laying all of the tiles now but I ran out of mastic and I need to make a supply run tomorrow. Here's the pics…



















Interesting series. Keep it up. Also, Second to the questions above.
 

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1,410 Posts
Getting things going...

NOTE TO THOSE WHO WANT TO DO THIS…
Please don't use regular grout like me. The wood shrinks slightly and is allowed to move because of the urethane adhesive remaining pliable. There's tiny little cracks where the wood has separated on the outer tiles in the room. It's not going to weather well, so I'm replacing the grout in the near future. Thank goodness endgrain floors are cheap material cost. :) Everything else I did was fine, but the grout was an experiment that proved bad. I'll leave this project here so you can see it, but be warned - I have now decided to try other grout mixes using flexible wood filler or epoxy/resin/sawdust mixes.


So now it's time to do all the cutting and laying and cutting and laying and cutting and…. well you get the idea. This room will use somewhere near 800 tiles to cover the entire floor. That means cutting up about 10-12 beams depending on how far down the beam and how many pieces get damaged. Sometimes there are cracks and the pieces can only be used as half pieces for custom cuts later on. I leave about 20% more than i need just incase. You can never have too much wood right?

I worked for about 10 hours strait getting lots of stuff done. I went and picked up the mastic and some other finishing materials at Home Depot. I came home and got started nailing the subfloor down and securing it to the concrete. Then I started the cutting and hauling in the tiles. With out going into great detail here's the progress. Give me questions in the comments and I'll answer. This shows you the stop I made on the table saw out of a piece of scrap thermofuse and how I put 3 beams at a time on the sliding table to speed things up. Here's a note however… if your table saw can't cut 4×8 beams in one pass… you're in for a lot more work than you know. Make sure if you're going to attempt an endgrain floor that you think through all of the processes before buying the lumber. My saw will cut up to around 5" tall. Most tablesaws cannot. So here's where I'm at. I'm almost done laying all of the tiles now but I ran out of mastic and I need to make a supply run tomorrow. Here's the pics…



















WOW great job!
Please post follow ups "grout" ect.
 

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Registered
Joined
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9,134 Posts
Getting things going...

NOTE TO THOSE WHO WANT TO DO THIS…
Please don't use regular grout like me. The wood shrinks slightly and is allowed to move because of the urethane adhesive remaining pliable. There's tiny little cracks where the wood has separated on the outer tiles in the room. It's not going to weather well, so I'm replacing the grout in the near future. Thank goodness endgrain floors are cheap material cost. :) Everything else I did was fine, but the grout was an experiment that proved bad. I'll leave this project here so you can see it, but be warned - I have now decided to try other grout mixes using flexible wood filler or epoxy/resin/sawdust mixes.


So now it's time to do all the cutting and laying and cutting and laying and cutting and…. well you get the idea. This room will use somewhere near 800 tiles to cover the entire floor. That means cutting up about 10-12 beams depending on how far down the beam and how many pieces get damaged. Sometimes there are cracks and the pieces can only be used as half pieces for custom cuts later on. I leave about 20% more than i need just incase. You can never have too much wood right?

I worked for about 10 hours strait getting lots of stuff done. I went and picked up the mastic and some other finishing materials at Home Depot. I came home and got started nailing the subfloor down and securing it to the concrete. Then I started the cutting and hauling in the tiles. With out going into great detail here's the progress. Give me questions in the comments and I'll answer. This shows you the stop I made on the table saw out of a piece of scrap thermofuse and how I put 3 beams at a time on the sliding table to speed things up. Here's a note however… if your table saw can't cut 4×8 beams in one pass… you're in for a lot more work than you know. Make sure if you're going to attempt an endgrain floor that you think through all of the processes before buying the lumber. My saw will cut up to around 5" tall. Most tablesaws cannot. So here's where I'm at. I'm almost done laying all of the tiles now but I ran out of mastic and I need to make a supply run tomorrow. Here's the pics…



















Great looking floor. I'm interested in how you plan on filing in the gaps. I assume it's not a tile filler product because that would fill up the pores of the wood also.
 
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