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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just ordered Jet DC1100RCK

I've just ordered my first dust collector, the Jet DC1100RCK.
Here's what went into my selection process:

I'd like to eventually try porting the air outside of my garage (no more worries about filtering effectiveness). This rules out the very attractive Delta 50-760, since it's very efficient design includes the impeller as part of the dust bag housing which would make an outlet hose difficult to implement. So, on to all of the other contenders.

I'd like to run it on 110, so this rules out > 1.5 HP (and the Powermatic at 1.75 HP/15A makes me worry about blowing the breaker too often). So, there are a number of choices in this category.

After reading about bags, filtering, cleaning, clogging, I decided I wanted to go for a canister.

I like the remote control, and when you add all these up, getting a fresh from the factory unit with all included makes the Jet look pretty good.

I ordered it from Woodcraft, as they have a special 20% off for Jet/Powermatic today/tomorrow. The discount conteracts the shipping charge so the total is about equal to what it would be to order from Amazon, but with all of the postings about shipping damage, I'm hoping that shipment straight from the factory will get me an undented unit.

Now I just need to be patient and clean out a spot in the garage for it!
 

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Just ordered Jet DC1100RCK

I've just ordered my first dust collector, the Jet DC1100RCK.
Here's what went into my selection process:

I'd like to eventually try porting the air outside of my garage (no more worries about filtering effectiveness). This rules out the very attractive Delta 50-760, since it's very efficient design includes the impeller as part of the dust bag housing which would make an outlet hose difficult to implement. So, on to all of the other contenders.

I'd like to run it on 110, so this rules out > 1.5 HP (and the Powermatic at 1.75 HP/15A makes me worry about blowing the breaker too often). So, there are a number of choices in this category.

After reading about bags, filtering, cleaning, clogging, I decided I wanted to go for a canister.

I like the remote control, and when you add all these up, getting a fresh from the factory unit with all included makes the Jet look pretty good.

I ordered it from Woodcraft, as they have a special 20% off for Jet/Powermatic today/tomorrow. The discount conteracts the shipping charge so the total is about equal to what it would be to order from Amazon, but with all of the postings about shipping damage, I'm hoping that shipment straight from the factory will get me an undented unit.

Now I just need to be patient and clean out a spot in the garage for it!
I hope it works great for you.
 

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Just ordered Jet DC1100RCK

I've just ordered my first dust collector, the Jet DC1100RCK.
Here's what went into my selection process:

I'd like to eventually try porting the air outside of my garage (no more worries about filtering effectiveness). This rules out the very attractive Delta 50-760, since it's very efficient design includes the impeller as part of the dust bag housing which would make an outlet hose difficult to implement. So, on to all of the other contenders.

I'd like to run it on 110, so this rules out > 1.5 HP (and the Powermatic at 1.75 HP/15A makes me worry about blowing the breaker too often). So, there are a number of choices in this category.

After reading about bags, filtering, cleaning, clogging, I decided I wanted to go for a canister.

I like the remote control, and when you add all these up, getting a fresh from the factory unit with all included makes the Jet look pretty good.

I ordered it from Woodcraft, as they have a special 20% off for Jet/Powermatic today/tomorrow. The discount conteracts the shipping charge so the total is about equal to what it would be to order from Amazon, but with all of the postings about shipping damage, I'm hoping that shipment straight from the factory will get me an undented unit.

Now I just need to be patient and clean out a spot in the garage for it!
I wouldn't worry, we sell Jet where I work and I've never seen a bad pallet from the manufacturer! I saw that dust collector promo the other day, made me wish I had more than 15 amps out in the garage!! Let us know how it works out for you!!
 

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Just ordered Jet DC1100RCK

I've just ordered my first dust collector, the Jet DC1100RCK.
Here's what went into my selection process:

I'd like to eventually try porting the air outside of my garage (no more worries about filtering effectiveness). This rules out the very attractive Delta 50-760, since it's very efficient design includes the impeller as part of the dust bag housing which would make an outlet hose difficult to implement. So, on to all of the other contenders.

I'd like to run it on 110, so this rules out > 1.5 HP (and the Powermatic at 1.75 HP/15A makes me worry about blowing the breaker too often). So, there are a number of choices in this category.

After reading about bags, filtering, cleaning, clogging, I decided I wanted to go for a canister.

I like the remote control, and when you add all these up, getting a fresh from the factory unit with all included makes the Jet look pretty good.

I ordered it from Woodcraft, as they have a special 20% off for Jet/Powermatic today/tomorrow. The discount conteracts the shipping charge so the total is about equal to what it would be to order from Amazon, but with all of the postings about shipping damage, I'm hoping that shipment straight from the factory will get me an undented unit.

Now I just need to be patient and clean out a spot in the garage for it!
I ordered the DC-1100RCK from Woodcraft on 9 April 09, received it on 31 May 09. Prewired for 115V. If you change to 230V the remote is useless. Not unless you want to plunk down another $89.99 for a 230V remote. No timer function either. The DC-1100RCK mfg prior to this had an integrated timer/remote unit that was switchable from 115V to 230V. Check the product description for item No. 829420 in their catalog, or online at Woodcraft.com.
Called Woodcraft today on this, they're checking on it….

kikasengr
 
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Just ordered Jet DC1100RCK

I've just ordered my first dust collector, the Jet DC1100RCK.
Here's what went into my selection process:

I'd like to eventually try porting the air outside of my garage (no more worries about filtering effectiveness). This rules out the very attractive Delta 50-760, since it's very efficient design includes the impeller as part of the dust bag housing which would make an outlet hose difficult to implement. So, on to all of the other contenders.

I'd like to run it on 110, so this rules out > 1.5 HP (and the Powermatic at 1.75 HP/15A makes me worry about blowing the breaker too often). So, there are a number of choices in this category.

After reading about bags, filtering, cleaning, clogging, I decided I wanted to go for a canister.

I like the remote control, and when you add all these up, getting a fresh from the factory unit with all included makes the Jet look pretty good.

I ordered it from Woodcraft, as they have a special 20% off for Jet/Powermatic today/tomorrow. The discount conteracts the shipping charge so the total is about equal to what it would be to order from Amazon, but with all of the postings about shipping damage, I'm hoping that shipment straight from the factory will get me an undented unit.

Now I just need to be patient and clean out a spot in the garage for it!
Cool I hope it works out well for ya.
 

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Just ordered Jet DC1100RCK

I've just ordered my first dust collector, the Jet DC1100RCK.
Here's what went into my selection process:

I'd like to eventually try porting the air outside of my garage (no more worries about filtering effectiveness). This rules out the very attractive Delta 50-760, since it's very efficient design includes the impeller as part of the dust bag housing which would make an outlet hose difficult to implement. So, on to all of the other contenders.

I'd like to run it on 110, so this rules out > 1.5 HP (and the Powermatic at 1.75 HP/15A makes me worry about blowing the breaker too often). So, there are a number of choices in this category.

After reading about bags, filtering, cleaning, clogging, I decided I wanted to go for a canister.

I like the remote control, and when you add all these up, getting a fresh from the factory unit with all included makes the Jet look pretty good.

I ordered it from Woodcraft, as they have a special 20% off for Jet/Powermatic today/tomorrow. The discount conteracts the shipping charge so the total is about equal to what it would be to order from Amazon, but with all of the postings about shipping damage, I'm hoping that shipment straight from the factory will get me an undented unit.

Now I just need to be patient and clean out a spot in the garage for it!
Yeah, and I also have to clear out some real estate in the garage for the new DC.

kikasengr
 

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Just ordered Jet DC1100RCK

I've just ordered my first dust collector, the Jet DC1100RCK.
Here's what went into my selection process:

I'd like to eventually try porting the air outside of my garage (no more worries about filtering effectiveness). This rules out the very attractive Delta 50-760, since it's very efficient design includes the impeller as part of the dust bag housing which would make an outlet hose difficult to implement. So, on to all of the other contenders.

I'd like to run it on 110, so this rules out > 1.5 HP (and the Powermatic at 1.75 HP/15A makes me worry about blowing the breaker too often). So, there are a number of choices in this category.

After reading about bags, filtering, cleaning, clogging, I decided I wanted to go for a canister.

I like the remote control, and when you add all these up, getting a fresh from the factory unit with all included makes the Jet look pretty good.

I ordered it from Woodcraft, as they have a special 20% off for Jet/Powermatic today/tomorrow. The discount conteracts the shipping charge so the total is about equal to what it would be to order from Amazon, but with all of the postings about shipping damage, I'm hoping that shipment straight from the factory will get me an undented unit.

Now I just need to be patient and clean out a spot in the garage for it!
congrats. I have their older DC1100 and it's a powerhorse- really sucks bigtime.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Just received and put together

Just received it. As Matt H. said it would, it came on a pallet, very well packed. Took me 1.5 hours to assemble, being very slow & careful. It does not come with a "starter" hose, so I'll pick up one of those tomorrow.
First project is going to be a back plate for my contractor's saw to close it up a bit.
 

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Just received and put together

Just received it. As Matt H. said it would, it came on a pallet, very well packed. Took me 1.5 hours to assemble, being very slow & careful. It does not come with a "starter" hose, so I'll pick up one of those tomorrow.
First project is going to be a back plate for my contractor's saw to close it up a bit.
good news. Photos later ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Just received and put together

Just received it. As Matt H. said it would, it came on a pallet, very well packed. Took me 1.5 hours to assemble, being very slow & careful. It does not come with a "starter" hose, so I'll pick up one of those tomorrow.
First project is going to be a back plate for my contractor's saw to close it up a bit.
Photos would be boring at this point - they'd look just like the catalog :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Sealing up the Contractor's saw for dust

I've been planning on doing a backplate for my old Delta 34-444 Contractor's saw to seal it up for dust collection.
.
I looked at a couple of things online, and the diagram from the Taunton book looked very close, I recreated the positions and angles for myself, drew it up in SketchUp - but then could not print out lifesize drawings (so gave up on that).

Next I played with cardboard, doing the radii with string & pencil, then followed it up today with hardboard. I was at the threshold of taking the motor off so I could put the back on, but I kept thinking there must be a better way.

The problem I've always seen with trying to enclose the whole motor is that it comes up above the table surface at the full 45 degree position. Looking at it, I realized that is because of the size of the belt - if I went with a longer belt, the motor will be lower. I played with adding more links to my Powertwist Link belt, and huzzah!
So, I'm going to drop the clumsy backplate, and now just build an enclosing box for the entire belt/motor/carriage assembly.

I'm really curious if anyone else has done this (lengthened belt, enclosed motor). I can see there might be worry about motor heat, but I do plan to use it with my brand new and too clean dust collector, so I don't expect a heat issue.
 

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Sealing up the Contractor's saw for dust

I've been planning on doing a backplate for my old Delta 34-444 Contractor's saw to seal it up for dust collection.
.
I looked at a couple of things online, and the diagram from the Taunton book looked very close, I recreated the positions and angles for myself, drew it up in SketchUp - but then could not print out lifesize drawings (so gave up on that).

Next I played with cardboard, doing the radii with string & pencil, then followed it up today with hardboard. I was at the threshold of taking the motor off so I could put the back on, but I kept thinking there must be a better way.

The problem I've always seen with trying to enclose the whole motor is that it comes up above the table surface at the full 45 degree position. Looking at it, I realized that is because of the size of the belt - if I went with a longer belt, the motor will be lower. I played with adding more links to my Powertwist Link belt, and huzzah!
So, I'm going to drop the clumsy backplate, and now just build an enclosing box for the entire belt/motor/carriage assembly.

I'm really curious if anyone else has done this (lengthened belt, enclosed motor). I can see there might be worry about motor heat, but I do plan to use it with my brand new and too clean dust collector, so I don't expect a heat issue.
I had enclosed the back of my Craftsman contractor saw with 1/8" hardboard. I had to remove the guard and the guard bracket. Used 2 pieces of hardboard and velcro to attach it to the saw body and to join the 2 pieces together. With the velcro attaching system, it wasn't a major event to remove it when I needed angled cuts. A while back I broke 1 of the pieces and have left it open since. Put the guard back on too.
 

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Sealing up the Contractor's saw for dust

I've been planning on doing a backplate for my old Delta 34-444 Contractor's saw to seal it up for dust collection.
.
I looked at a couple of things online, and the diagram from the Taunton book looked very close, I recreated the positions and angles for myself, drew it up in SketchUp - but then could not print out lifesize drawings (so gave up on that).

Next I played with cardboard, doing the radii with string & pencil, then followed it up today with hardboard. I was at the threshold of taking the motor off so I could put the back on, but I kept thinking there must be a better way.

The problem I've always seen with trying to enclose the whole motor is that it comes up above the table surface at the full 45 degree position. Looking at it, I realized that is because of the size of the belt - if I went with a longer belt, the motor will be lower. I played with adding more links to my Powertwist Link belt, and huzzah!
So, I'm going to drop the clumsy backplate, and now just build an enclosing box for the entire belt/motor/carriage assembly.

I'm really curious if anyone else has done this (lengthened belt, enclosed motor). I can see there might be worry about motor heat, but I do plan to use it with my brand new and too clean dust collector, so I don't expect a heat issue.
Here's a PDF from Fine Woodworking that is very good.

You may have to join in order to see it, but they have a 14 day free trial now.
 

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Sealing up the Contractor's saw for dust

I've been planning on doing a backplate for my old Delta 34-444 Contractor's saw to seal it up for dust collection.
.
I looked at a couple of things online, and the diagram from the Taunton book looked very close, I recreated the positions and angles for myself, drew it up in SketchUp - but then could not print out lifesize drawings (so gave up on that).

Next I played with cardboard, doing the radii with string & pencil, then followed it up today with hardboard. I was at the threshold of taking the motor off so I could put the back on, but I kept thinking there must be a better way.

The problem I've always seen with trying to enclose the whole motor is that it comes up above the table surface at the full 45 degree position. Looking at it, I realized that is because of the size of the belt - if I went with a longer belt, the motor will be lower. I played with adding more links to my Powertwist Link belt, and huzzah!
So, I'm going to drop the clumsy backplate, and now just build an enclosing box for the entire belt/motor/carriage assembly.

I'm really curious if anyone else has done this (lengthened belt, enclosed motor). I can see there might be worry about motor heat, but I do plan to use it with my brand new and too clean dust collector, so I don't expect a heat issue.
The article in FWW specifically addresses enclosing the motor - if I understand correctly enclosing the motor in this fashion FORCES cooling airflow over the motor housing (as the enclosed area is so well sealed), thereby improving the cooling of the motor! Darn clever. I have the Jet DC you bought, and I just love it. Plan to enclose the base of my Jet 10" contractor's saw, but am trying to design an entire table saw workstation around it. Lots of good ideas to incorporate from various magazines/websites/photos on LJ. One of these days, I'll come up with a plan and begin to keep you all informed of the progress.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Contractor Saw enclosed for dust

I've just finished adding a box to the back of my old contractor's saw to enclose the entire motor/belt assembly, and a dust port below the saw.

I had replaced the motor drive belt previously with a Power Twist Link belt assembled to the same size as the factory belt. With this belt, however, the motor would rotate above the top surface of the tablesaw. I lengthened the belt by adding a couple more links, made sure that it did not hit anything throughout the rotation, and was able to keep the motor below the saw surface.

My saw sits on top of a roll-around stand (Woodsmith, v. 18, n. 107, Oct. '96). The lip jutting behind the saw provides a place for a box to rest on top of, so the resulting box that shrouds the motor needs to:
- Rest on the lip
- Enclose the back opening of the saw
- Extend further to the side and down to be outside of the area swept by the motor as it rotates
- Have a channel to prevent interference with the fence or the motor
- Have a "sawtooth" plate to allow hooking up underneath the tabletop of the saw with all of its bolts and casting ridges

Pictures will make this more clear.
Here's the back of the saw ("before"):


Here's a picture of the box, showing the channel and opening, ready to be just lifted into place:


Here's the box, in place, with top and back panels removed so you can see how things fit inside:



Here's a close-up of the channel at the top, providing clearance for the back fence rail:


Now, the dust port assembly that fits below the saw. The inspiration for the dust port came from the web:
http://www.ncwoodworker.net/forums/f31/contractor-saw-dust-hood-23853/
There are three pieces that provide a lip inside the saw that the port assembly fits into as it hangs below:





Here it is, mounted in the saw:


Finally, the "after" picture with it all on the saw:


Maybe I should have just bought a cabinet saw :)

I haven't had a chance to actually use it, yet, so I'll report back later on how it all works.

As a side note, the back box is not level with the table surface. It's not designed to handle a lot of weight, and it was not my starting idea to make it act as an out-feed table. If I were starting over, I'd give this some more thought, but my long term intention is to do a much more extensive cabinet for the saw anyway.
 

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Contractor Saw enclosed for dust

I've just finished adding a box to the back of my old contractor's saw to enclose the entire motor/belt assembly, and a dust port below the saw.

I had replaced the motor drive belt previously with a Power Twist Link belt assembled to the same size as the factory belt. With this belt, however, the motor would rotate above the top surface of the tablesaw. I lengthened the belt by adding a couple more links, made sure that it did not hit anything throughout the rotation, and was able to keep the motor below the saw surface.

My saw sits on top of a roll-around stand (Woodsmith, v. 18, n. 107, Oct. '96). The lip jutting behind the saw provides a place for a box to rest on top of, so the resulting box that shrouds the motor needs to:
- Rest on the lip
- Enclose the back opening of the saw
- Extend further to the side and down to be outside of the area swept by the motor as it rotates
- Have a channel to prevent interference with the fence or the motor
- Have a "sawtooth" plate to allow hooking up underneath the tabletop of the saw with all of its bolts and casting ridges

Pictures will make this more clear.
Here's the back of the saw ("before"):


Here's a picture of the box, showing the channel and opening, ready to be just lifted into place:


Here's the box, in place, with top and back panels removed so you can see how things fit inside:



Here's a close-up of the channel at the top, providing clearance for the back fence rail:


Now, the dust port assembly that fits below the saw. The inspiration for the dust port came from the web:
http://www.ncwoodworker.net/forums/f31/contractor-saw-dust-hood-23853/
There are three pieces that provide a lip inside the saw that the port assembly fits into as it hangs below:





Here it is, mounted in the saw:


Finally, the "after" picture with it all on the saw:


Maybe I should have just bought a cabinet saw :)

I haven't had a chance to actually use it, yet, so I'll report back later on how it all works.

As a side note, the back box is not level with the table surface. It's not designed to handle a lot of weight, and it was not my starting idea to make it act as an out-feed table. If I were starting over, I'd give this some more thought, but my long term intention is to do a much more extensive cabinet for the saw anyway.
Great idea well done
 

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Contractor Saw enclosed for dust

I've just finished adding a box to the back of my old contractor's saw to enclose the entire motor/belt assembly, and a dust port below the saw.

I had replaced the motor drive belt previously with a Power Twist Link belt assembled to the same size as the factory belt. With this belt, however, the motor would rotate above the top surface of the tablesaw. I lengthened the belt by adding a couple more links, made sure that it did not hit anything throughout the rotation, and was able to keep the motor below the saw surface.

My saw sits on top of a roll-around stand (Woodsmith, v. 18, n. 107, Oct. '96). The lip jutting behind the saw provides a place for a box to rest on top of, so the resulting box that shrouds the motor needs to:
- Rest on the lip
- Enclose the back opening of the saw
- Extend further to the side and down to be outside of the area swept by the motor as it rotates
- Have a channel to prevent interference with the fence or the motor
- Have a "sawtooth" plate to allow hooking up underneath the tabletop of the saw with all of its bolts and casting ridges

Pictures will make this more clear.
Here's the back of the saw ("before"):


Here's a picture of the box, showing the channel and opening, ready to be just lifted into place:


Here's the box, in place, with top and back panels removed so you can see how things fit inside:



Here's a close-up of the channel at the top, providing clearance for the back fence rail:


Now, the dust port assembly that fits below the saw. The inspiration for the dust port came from the web:
http://www.ncwoodworker.net/forums/f31/contractor-saw-dust-hood-23853/
There are three pieces that provide a lip inside the saw that the port assembly fits into as it hangs below:





Here it is, mounted in the saw:


Finally, the "after" picture with it all on the saw:


Maybe I should have just bought a cabinet saw :)

I haven't had a chance to actually use it, yet, so I'll report back later on how it all works.

As a side note, the back box is not level with the table surface. It's not designed to handle a lot of weight, and it was not my starting idea to make it act as an out-feed table. If I were starting over, I'd give this some more thought, but my long term intention is to do a much more extensive cabinet for the saw anyway.
I am thinking of doing this on my contractor saw as well. I seen an article in Fine Woodworking magazine Jun issue. They had cut three slots at the back near the rear of the motor to help draw air across the motor to help cool the motor and direct air flow. I was wondering how much this may affect the motor overheating under heavy use. Make sure you check your red belt at both extremes all the way up and down. I tried adjusting mine and it kept hitting the bolt on the guard that the wing nut is on. It would be ok at the lowest blade height setting and then when I raised it to 3 1/2 inches it would hit. I tried in vain to adjust the links to no avail and I finally just removed the guard because I plan on enclosing as you did anyway. Hope it all works well for you!
Thanks for the post!
 

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Contractor Saw enclosed for dust

I've just finished adding a box to the back of my old contractor's saw to enclose the entire motor/belt assembly, and a dust port below the saw.

I had replaced the motor drive belt previously with a Power Twist Link belt assembled to the same size as the factory belt. With this belt, however, the motor would rotate above the top surface of the tablesaw. I lengthened the belt by adding a couple more links, made sure that it did not hit anything throughout the rotation, and was able to keep the motor below the saw surface.

My saw sits on top of a roll-around stand (Woodsmith, v. 18, n. 107, Oct. '96). The lip jutting behind the saw provides a place for a box to rest on top of, so the resulting box that shrouds the motor needs to:
- Rest on the lip
- Enclose the back opening of the saw
- Extend further to the side and down to be outside of the area swept by the motor as it rotates
- Have a channel to prevent interference with the fence or the motor
- Have a "sawtooth" plate to allow hooking up underneath the tabletop of the saw with all of its bolts and casting ridges

Pictures will make this more clear.
Here's the back of the saw ("before"):


Here's a picture of the box, showing the channel and opening, ready to be just lifted into place:


Here's the box, in place, with top and back panels removed so you can see how things fit inside:



Here's a close-up of the channel at the top, providing clearance for the back fence rail:


Now, the dust port assembly that fits below the saw. The inspiration for the dust port came from the web:
http://www.ncwoodworker.net/forums/f31/contractor-saw-dust-hood-23853/
There are three pieces that provide a lip inside the saw that the port assembly fits into as it hangs below:





Here it is, mounted in the saw:


Finally, the "after" picture with it all on the saw:


Maybe I should have just bought a cabinet saw :)

I haven't had a chance to actually use it, yet, so I'll report back later on how it all works.

As a side note, the back box is not level with the table surface. It's not designed to handle a lot of weight, and it was not my starting idea to make it act as an out-feed table. If I were starting over, I'd give this some more thought, but my long term intention is to do a much more extensive cabinet for the saw anyway.
I have this same saw but mine is on a metal open leg stand that came with it. I built a box below the saw with a trap door in the bottom. I purchased a plastic toilet flange and anchored it to the side of the box. Most of the sawdust is collected The stuff that isn't I lower the trap door and sweep it out. I've found that the dust that falls into the saw doesn't exit out the back. This is with wood. Things like mdf are another story all together.
 
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