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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
From Micro to Macro

Having thoroughly enjoyed making the Little Bess Ring Box, the smallest project I've ever made in boxes, I have decided to go to the other end of the scale. I've always hankered after a Drum Sander but could never afford the £500+ price tag. I idly tapped 'drum sander' into the search box and found that not only was I not alone in not being able to afford one but that there was a solution. Build you own. There are numerous ideas out there but the soundest seems to be (I'll probably regret saying that, I usually do) The plan off of Dominics Woodshop. The link is provided on a blog by Yorkshire Stewart to whom I am grateful.

http://www.rockslide.org/drum%20sander.html

Scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the PLAN link

First things first what have I already got to make this a 'goer' or possibility. Well an old induction motor and pulley set

various bits of hardwood, screws etc. etc.

Most of it I've had to buy in though and I'll total it up at the end. Anyway I started off with what has become one of my favourite pasttmes, scouring the net for bargains. This turned up the pillow block bearings, steel rod and a longer pulley belt (longer than the one I had). This allowed me to size things up on the bench

The original design has a 12" wide table and drum but the 3/4" steel rod I had bought allows for a 14" table. Theres a bonus.

Most of the rest of the stuff; timber (I chose softwood its cheaper), screws, threaded rod I could buy from work (and get a 10% discount).

This shows the frame pieces cut to length. Cutting the lap joints on the tablesaw was going to take forever with a 1/8" inch blade. Dado blades seem to be hard to come by in the UK so I improvised. The depth of the arbour on my saw allowed me to double up on blades (6mm or 1/4"). I know this is risky but I asked permission from Autumn's tablesaw Gods and did it up extra tight. Stood to the side and set it running. A minor tinkling sound, which turned out to be a small piece of sycamore trapped in the guard, but no explosions or flying saw blades. I let it run for 5 minutes. Still no problems. With this setup I finished off the 26 lap/halving joints in an hour and a half. Result!

I've lined the struts the bearing blocks are mounted on (and the one the table pivots on) with whatever non-exotic hardwood I had laying about. Oak and Maple. So here's the build so far.


This has taken about three days so far but I'm on holiday this week so who cares
 

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7,426 Posts
From Micro to Macro

Having thoroughly enjoyed making the Little Bess Ring Box, the smallest project I've ever made in boxes, I have decided to go to the other end of the scale. I've always hankered after a Drum Sander but could never afford the £500+ price tag. I idly tapped 'drum sander' into the search box and found that not only was I not alone in not being able to afford one but that there was a solution. Build you own. There are numerous ideas out there but the soundest seems to be (I'll probably regret saying that, I usually do) The plan off of Dominics Woodshop. The link is provided on a blog by Yorkshire Stewart to whom I am grateful.

http://www.rockslide.org/drum%20sander.html

Scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the PLAN link

First things first what have I already got to make this a 'goer' or possibility. Well an old induction motor and pulley set

various bits of hardwood, screws etc. etc.

Most of it I've had to buy in though and I'll total it up at the end. Anyway I started off with what has become one of my favourite pasttmes, scouring the net for bargains. This turned up the pillow block bearings, steel rod and a longer pulley belt (longer than the one I had). This allowed me to size things up on the bench

The original design has a 12" wide table and drum but the 3/4" steel rod I had bought allows for a 14" table. Theres a bonus.

Most of the rest of the stuff; timber (I chose softwood its cheaper), screws, threaded rod I could buy from work (and get a 10% discount).

This shows the frame pieces cut to length. Cutting the lap joints on the tablesaw was going to take forever with a 1/8" inch blade. Dado blades seem to be hard to come by in the UK so I improvised. The depth of the arbour on my saw allowed me to double up on blades (6mm or 1/4"). I know this is risky but I asked permission from Autumn's tablesaw Gods and did it up extra tight. Stood to the side and set it running. A minor tinkling sound, which turned out to be a small piece of sycamore trapped in the guard, but no explosions or flying saw blades. I let it run for 5 minutes. Still no problems. With this setup I finished off the 26 lap/halving joints in an hour and a half. Result!

I've lined the struts the bearing blocks are mounted on (and the one the table pivots on) with whatever non-exotic hardwood I had laying about. Oak and Maple. So here's the build so far.


This has taken about three days so far but I'm on holiday this week so who cares
I for one will be waiting for the next installment…
 

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8,740 Posts
From Micro to Macro

Having thoroughly enjoyed making the Little Bess Ring Box, the smallest project I've ever made in boxes, I have decided to go to the other end of the scale. I've always hankered after a Drum Sander but could never afford the £500+ price tag. I idly tapped 'drum sander' into the search box and found that not only was I not alone in not being able to afford one but that there was a solution. Build you own. There are numerous ideas out there but the soundest seems to be (I'll probably regret saying that, I usually do) The plan off of Dominics Woodshop. The link is provided on a blog by Yorkshire Stewart to whom I am grateful.

http://www.rockslide.org/drum%20sander.html

Scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the PLAN link

First things first what have I already got to make this a 'goer' or possibility. Well an old induction motor and pulley set

various bits of hardwood, screws etc. etc.

Most of it I've had to buy in though and I'll total it up at the end. Anyway I started off with what has become one of my favourite pasttmes, scouring the net for bargains. This turned up the pillow block bearings, steel rod and a longer pulley belt (longer than the one I had). This allowed me to size things up on the bench

The original design has a 12" wide table and drum but the 3/4" steel rod I had bought allows for a 14" table. Theres a bonus.

Most of the rest of the stuff; timber (I chose softwood its cheaper), screws, threaded rod I could buy from work (and get a 10% discount).

This shows the frame pieces cut to length. Cutting the lap joints on the tablesaw was going to take forever with a 1/8" inch blade. Dado blades seem to be hard to come by in the UK so I improvised. The depth of the arbour on my saw allowed me to double up on blades (6mm or 1/4"). I know this is risky but I asked permission from Autumn's tablesaw Gods and did it up extra tight. Stood to the side and set it running. A minor tinkling sound, which turned out to be a small piece of sycamore trapped in the guard, but no explosions or flying saw blades. I let it run for 5 minutes. Still no problems. With this setup I finished off the 26 lap/halving joints in an hour and a half. Result!

I've lined the struts the bearing blocks are mounted on (and the one the table pivots on) with whatever non-exotic hardwood I had laying about. Oak and Maple. So here's the build so far.


This has taken about three days so far but I'm on holiday this week so who cares
looking good!
 

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From Micro to Macro

Having thoroughly enjoyed making the Little Bess Ring Box, the smallest project I've ever made in boxes, I have decided to go to the other end of the scale. I've always hankered after a Drum Sander but could never afford the £500+ price tag. I idly tapped 'drum sander' into the search box and found that not only was I not alone in not being able to afford one but that there was a solution. Build you own. There are numerous ideas out there but the soundest seems to be (I'll probably regret saying that, I usually do) The plan off of Dominics Woodshop. The link is provided on a blog by Yorkshire Stewart to whom I am grateful.

http://www.rockslide.org/drum%20sander.html

Scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the PLAN link

First things first what have I already got to make this a 'goer' or possibility. Well an old induction motor and pulley set

various bits of hardwood, screws etc. etc.

Most of it I've had to buy in though and I'll total it up at the end. Anyway I started off with what has become one of my favourite pasttmes, scouring the net for bargains. This turned up the pillow block bearings, steel rod and a longer pulley belt (longer than the one I had). This allowed me to size things up on the bench

The original design has a 12" wide table and drum but the 3/4" steel rod I had bought allows for a 14" table. Theres a bonus.

Most of the rest of the stuff; timber (I chose softwood its cheaper), screws, threaded rod I could buy from work (and get a 10% discount).

This shows the frame pieces cut to length. Cutting the lap joints on the tablesaw was going to take forever with a 1/8" inch blade. Dado blades seem to be hard to come by in the UK so I improvised. The depth of the arbour on my saw allowed me to double up on blades (6mm or 1/4"). I know this is risky but I asked permission from Autumn's tablesaw Gods and did it up extra tight. Stood to the side and set it running. A minor tinkling sound, which turned out to be a small piece of sycamore trapped in the guard, but no explosions or flying saw blades. I let it run for 5 minutes. Still no problems. With this setup I finished off the 26 lap/halving joints in an hour and a half. Result!

I've lined the struts the bearing blocks are mounted on (and the one the table pivots on) with whatever non-exotic hardwood I had laying about. Oak and Maple. So here's the build so far.


This has taken about three days so far but I'm on holiday this week so who cares
I'll be looking forward to seeing the rest of the build. I'd love to have one of these as well but, I'd have to shrink it down to pocket-sized. No room in my shop for such a luxury.
 

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From Micro to Macro

Having thoroughly enjoyed making the Little Bess Ring Box, the smallest project I've ever made in boxes, I have decided to go to the other end of the scale. I've always hankered after a Drum Sander but could never afford the £500+ price tag. I idly tapped 'drum sander' into the search box and found that not only was I not alone in not being able to afford one but that there was a solution. Build you own. There are numerous ideas out there but the soundest seems to be (I'll probably regret saying that, I usually do) The plan off of Dominics Woodshop. The link is provided on a blog by Yorkshire Stewart to whom I am grateful.

http://www.rockslide.org/drum%20sander.html

Scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the PLAN link

First things first what have I already got to make this a 'goer' or possibility. Well an old induction motor and pulley set

various bits of hardwood, screws etc. etc.

Most of it I've had to buy in though and I'll total it up at the end. Anyway I started off with what has become one of my favourite pasttmes, scouring the net for bargains. This turned up the pillow block bearings, steel rod and a longer pulley belt (longer than the one I had). This allowed me to size things up on the bench

The original design has a 12" wide table and drum but the 3/4" steel rod I had bought allows for a 14" table. Theres a bonus.

Most of the rest of the stuff; timber (I chose softwood its cheaper), screws, threaded rod I could buy from work (and get a 10% discount).

This shows the frame pieces cut to length. Cutting the lap joints on the tablesaw was going to take forever with a 1/8" inch blade. Dado blades seem to be hard to come by in the UK so I improvised. The depth of the arbour on my saw allowed me to double up on blades (6mm or 1/4"). I know this is risky but I asked permission from Autumn's tablesaw Gods and did it up extra tight. Stood to the side and set it running. A minor tinkling sound, which turned out to be a small piece of sycamore trapped in the guard, but no explosions or flying saw blades. I let it run for 5 minutes. Still no problems. With this setup I finished off the 26 lap/halving joints in an hour and a half. Result!

I've lined the struts the bearing blocks are mounted on (and the one the table pivots on) with whatever non-exotic hardwood I had laying about. Oak and Maple. So here's the build so far.


This has taken about three days so far but I'm on holiday this week so who cares
I thought this blog was to show that you got a plane
but then again you surprice everyone , already near finished
with the sander
thank´s for sharing some of your thoughts before finishing it
and it looks dam good sofare from what I can see
looking forward to see some dust flying from it

Dennis
 

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From Micro to Macro

Having thoroughly enjoyed making the Little Bess Ring Box, the smallest project I've ever made in boxes, I have decided to go to the other end of the scale. I've always hankered after a Drum Sander but could never afford the £500+ price tag. I idly tapped 'drum sander' into the search box and found that not only was I not alone in not being able to afford one but that there was a solution. Build you own. There are numerous ideas out there but the soundest seems to be (I'll probably regret saying that, I usually do) The plan off of Dominics Woodshop. The link is provided on a blog by Yorkshire Stewart to whom I am grateful.

http://www.rockslide.org/drum%20sander.html

Scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the PLAN link

First things first what have I already got to make this a 'goer' or possibility. Well an old induction motor and pulley set

various bits of hardwood, screws etc. etc.

Most of it I've had to buy in though and I'll total it up at the end. Anyway I started off with what has become one of my favourite pasttmes, scouring the net for bargains. This turned up the pillow block bearings, steel rod and a longer pulley belt (longer than the one I had). This allowed me to size things up on the bench

The original design has a 12" wide table and drum but the 3/4" steel rod I had bought allows for a 14" table. Theres a bonus.

Most of the rest of the stuff; timber (I chose softwood its cheaper), screws, threaded rod I could buy from work (and get a 10% discount).

This shows the frame pieces cut to length. Cutting the lap joints on the tablesaw was going to take forever with a 1/8" inch blade. Dado blades seem to be hard to come by in the UK so I improvised. The depth of the arbour on my saw allowed me to double up on blades (6mm or 1/4"). I know this is risky but I asked permission from Autumn's tablesaw Gods and did it up extra tight. Stood to the side and set it running. A minor tinkling sound, which turned out to be a small piece of sycamore trapped in the guard, but no explosions or flying saw blades. I let it run for 5 minutes. Still no problems. With this setup I finished off the 26 lap/halving joints in an hour and a half. Result!

I've lined the struts the bearing blocks are mounted on (and the one the table pivots on) with whatever non-exotic hardwood I had laying about. Oak and Maple. So here's the build so far.


This has taken about three days so far but I'm on holiday this week so who cares
Oh, good for you!!

I wimped out and bought a drum sander (Jet 16-32 Plus) a while back. Maybe in 6 months or a year, I'll feel like I have the skill level and patience to build one, but I am really glad I made the purchase.

If I am finding a drum sander to be a valuable addition to my shop, I can imagine how pleased you will be with one in your more capable hands.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
From Micro to Macro

Having thoroughly enjoyed making the Little Bess Ring Box, the smallest project I've ever made in boxes, I have decided to go to the other end of the scale. I've always hankered after a Drum Sander but could never afford the £500+ price tag. I idly tapped 'drum sander' into the search box and found that not only was I not alone in not being able to afford one but that there was a solution. Build you own. There are numerous ideas out there but the soundest seems to be (I'll probably regret saying that, I usually do) The plan off of Dominics Woodshop. The link is provided on a blog by Yorkshire Stewart to whom I am grateful.

http://www.rockslide.org/drum%20sander.html

Scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the PLAN link

First things first what have I already got to make this a 'goer' or possibility. Well an old induction motor and pulley set

various bits of hardwood, screws etc. etc.

Most of it I've had to buy in though and I'll total it up at the end. Anyway I started off with what has become one of my favourite pasttmes, scouring the net for bargains. This turned up the pillow block bearings, steel rod and a longer pulley belt (longer than the one I had). This allowed me to size things up on the bench

The original design has a 12" wide table and drum but the 3/4" steel rod I had bought allows for a 14" table. Theres a bonus.

Most of the rest of the stuff; timber (I chose softwood its cheaper), screws, threaded rod I could buy from work (and get a 10% discount).

This shows the frame pieces cut to length. Cutting the lap joints on the tablesaw was going to take forever with a 1/8" inch blade. Dado blades seem to be hard to come by in the UK so I improvised. The depth of the arbour on my saw allowed me to double up on blades (6mm or 1/4"). I know this is risky but I asked permission from Autumn's tablesaw Gods and did it up extra tight. Stood to the side and set it running. A minor tinkling sound, which turned out to be a small piece of sycamore trapped in the guard, but no explosions or flying saw blades. I let it run for 5 minutes. Still no problems. With this setup I finished off the 26 lap/halving joints in an hour and a half. Result!

I've lined the struts the bearing blocks are mounted on (and the one the table pivots on) with whatever non-exotic hardwood I had laying about. Oak and Maple. So here's the build so far.


This has taken about three days so far but I'm on holiday this week so who cares
Hey now Mary Anne. We've all got our skills. I cannot turn, I've tried. The results are too hideous to post.
LOL

Martyn
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
From Micro to Macro

Having thoroughly enjoyed making the Little Bess Ring Box, the smallest project I've ever made in boxes, I have decided to go to the other end of the scale. I've always hankered after a Drum Sander but could never afford the £500+ price tag. I idly tapped 'drum sander' into the search box and found that not only was I not alone in not being able to afford one but that there was a solution. Build you own. There are numerous ideas out there but the soundest seems to be (I'll probably regret saying that, I usually do) The plan off of Dominics Woodshop. The link is provided on a blog by Yorkshire Stewart to whom I am grateful.

http://www.rockslide.org/drum%20sander.html

Scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the PLAN link

First things first what have I already got to make this a 'goer' or possibility. Well an old induction motor and pulley set

various bits of hardwood, screws etc. etc.

Most of it I've had to buy in though and I'll total it up at the end. Anyway I started off with what has become one of my favourite pasttmes, scouring the net for bargains. This turned up the pillow block bearings, steel rod and a longer pulley belt (longer than the one I had). This allowed me to size things up on the bench

The original design has a 12" wide table and drum but the 3/4" steel rod I had bought allows for a 14" table. Theres a bonus.

Most of the rest of the stuff; timber (I chose softwood its cheaper), screws, threaded rod I could buy from work (and get a 10% discount).

This shows the frame pieces cut to length. Cutting the lap joints on the tablesaw was going to take forever with a 1/8" inch blade. Dado blades seem to be hard to come by in the UK so I improvised. The depth of the arbour on my saw allowed me to double up on blades (6mm or 1/4"). I know this is risky but I asked permission from Autumn's tablesaw Gods and did it up extra tight. Stood to the side and set it running. A minor tinkling sound, which turned out to be a small piece of sycamore trapped in the guard, but no explosions or flying saw blades. I let it run for 5 minutes. Still no problems. With this setup I finished off the 26 lap/halving joints in an hour and a half. Result!

I've lined the struts the bearing blocks are mounted on (and the one the table pivots on) with whatever non-exotic hardwood I had laying about. Oak and Maple. So here's the build so far.


This has taken about three days so far but I'm on holiday this week so who cares
Jack, you could scale it down.

How about using a wooden rolling pin as the drum? Powered by a hand drill. I seem to remember from the 60's and 70's that there were numerous attachments for hand drills. Go on give it a go.

Martyn
 

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375 Posts
From Micro to Macro

Having thoroughly enjoyed making the Little Bess Ring Box, the smallest project I've ever made in boxes, I have decided to go to the other end of the scale. I've always hankered after a Drum Sander but could never afford the £500+ price tag. I idly tapped 'drum sander' into the search box and found that not only was I not alone in not being able to afford one but that there was a solution. Build you own. There are numerous ideas out there but the soundest seems to be (I'll probably regret saying that, I usually do) The plan off of Dominics Woodshop. The link is provided on a blog by Yorkshire Stewart to whom I am grateful.

http://www.rockslide.org/drum%20sander.html

Scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the PLAN link

First things first what have I already got to make this a 'goer' or possibility. Well an old induction motor and pulley set

various bits of hardwood, screws etc. etc.

Most of it I've had to buy in though and I'll total it up at the end. Anyway I started off with what has become one of my favourite pasttmes, scouring the net for bargains. This turned up the pillow block bearings, steel rod and a longer pulley belt (longer than the one I had). This allowed me to size things up on the bench

The original design has a 12" wide table and drum but the 3/4" steel rod I had bought allows for a 14" table. Theres a bonus.

Most of the rest of the stuff; timber (I chose softwood its cheaper), screws, threaded rod I could buy from work (and get a 10% discount).

This shows the frame pieces cut to length. Cutting the lap joints on the tablesaw was going to take forever with a 1/8" inch blade. Dado blades seem to be hard to come by in the UK so I improvised. The depth of the arbour on my saw allowed me to double up on blades (6mm or 1/4"). I know this is risky but I asked permission from Autumn's tablesaw Gods and did it up extra tight. Stood to the side and set it running. A minor tinkling sound, which turned out to be a small piece of sycamore trapped in the guard, but no explosions or flying saw blades. I let it run for 5 minutes. Still no problems. With this setup I finished off the 26 lap/halving joints in an hour and a half. Result!

I've lined the struts the bearing blocks are mounted on (and the one the table pivots on) with whatever non-exotic hardwood I had laying about. Oak and Maple. So here's the build so far.


This has taken about three days so far but I'm on holiday this week so who cares
I don't think I would get the preferred accuracy from a hand drill/rolling pin combination. For now, I think I'll stick with my thickness planer/ROS combination. But, some day . . . . . . . . maybe.
 

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From Micro to Macro

Having thoroughly enjoyed making the Little Bess Ring Box, the smallest project I've ever made in boxes, I have decided to go to the other end of the scale. I've always hankered after a Drum Sander but could never afford the £500+ price tag. I idly tapped 'drum sander' into the search box and found that not only was I not alone in not being able to afford one but that there was a solution. Build you own. There are numerous ideas out there but the soundest seems to be (I'll probably regret saying that, I usually do) The plan off of Dominics Woodshop. The link is provided on a blog by Yorkshire Stewart to whom I am grateful.

http://www.rockslide.org/drum%20sander.html

Scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the PLAN link

First things first what have I already got to make this a 'goer' or possibility. Well an old induction motor and pulley set

various bits of hardwood, screws etc. etc.

Most of it I've had to buy in though and I'll total it up at the end. Anyway I started off with what has become one of my favourite pasttmes, scouring the net for bargains. This turned up the pillow block bearings, steel rod and a longer pulley belt (longer than the one I had). This allowed me to size things up on the bench

The original design has a 12" wide table and drum but the 3/4" steel rod I had bought allows for a 14" table. Theres a bonus.

Most of the rest of the stuff; timber (I chose softwood its cheaper), screws, threaded rod I could buy from work (and get a 10% discount).

This shows the frame pieces cut to length. Cutting the lap joints on the tablesaw was going to take forever with a 1/8" inch blade. Dado blades seem to be hard to come by in the UK so I improvised. The depth of the arbour on my saw allowed me to double up on blades (6mm or 1/4"). I know this is risky but I asked permission from Autumn's tablesaw Gods and did it up extra tight. Stood to the side and set it running. A minor tinkling sound, which turned out to be a small piece of sycamore trapped in the guard, but no explosions or flying saw blades. I let it run for 5 minutes. Still no problems. With this setup I finished off the 26 lap/halving joints in an hour and a half. Result!

I've lined the struts the bearing blocks are mounted on (and the one the table pivots on) with whatever non-exotic hardwood I had laying about. Oak and Maple. So here's the build so far.


This has taken about three days so far but I'm on holiday this week so who cares
Wow that looks nice, Allways want to make one too.
The problem is I want to much and the time is going so fast.
I have the motor from an old painting machine. Now the rest…....
 

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17,103 Posts
From Micro to Macro

Having thoroughly enjoyed making the Little Bess Ring Box, the smallest project I've ever made in boxes, I have decided to go to the other end of the scale. I've always hankered after a Drum Sander but could never afford the £500+ price tag. I idly tapped 'drum sander' into the search box and found that not only was I not alone in not being able to afford one but that there was a solution. Build you own. There are numerous ideas out there but the soundest seems to be (I'll probably regret saying that, I usually do) The plan off of Dominics Woodshop. The link is provided on a blog by Yorkshire Stewart to whom I am grateful.

http://www.rockslide.org/drum%20sander.html

Scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the PLAN link

First things first what have I already got to make this a 'goer' or possibility. Well an old induction motor and pulley set

various bits of hardwood, screws etc. etc.

Most of it I've had to buy in though and I'll total it up at the end. Anyway I started off with what has become one of my favourite pasttmes, scouring the net for bargains. This turned up the pillow block bearings, steel rod and a longer pulley belt (longer than the one I had). This allowed me to size things up on the bench

The original design has a 12" wide table and drum but the 3/4" steel rod I had bought allows for a 14" table. Theres a bonus.

Most of the rest of the stuff; timber (I chose softwood its cheaper), screws, threaded rod I could buy from work (and get a 10% discount).

This shows the frame pieces cut to length. Cutting the lap joints on the tablesaw was going to take forever with a 1/8" inch blade. Dado blades seem to be hard to come by in the UK so I improvised. The depth of the arbour on my saw allowed me to double up on blades (6mm or 1/4"). I know this is risky but I asked permission from Autumn's tablesaw Gods and did it up extra tight. Stood to the side and set it running. A minor tinkling sound, which turned out to be a small piece of sycamore trapped in the guard, but no explosions or flying saw blades. I let it run for 5 minutes. Still no problems. With this setup I finished off the 26 lap/halving joints in an hour and a half. Result!

I've lined the struts the bearing blocks are mounted on (and the one the table pivots on) with whatever non-exotic hardwood I had laying about. Oak and Maple. So here's the build so far.


This has taken about three days so far but I'm on holiday this week so who cares
You never cease to surprise me Martyn. I will be watching with great interest. I have been thinking about making one of these myself, but never can seem to get off my backside long enough. It looks great so far. Keep up the good work.
 

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From Micro to Macro

Having thoroughly enjoyed making the Little Bess Ring Box, the smallest project I've ever made in boxes, I have decided to go to the other end of the scale. I've always hankered after a Drum Sander but could never afford the £500+ price tag. I idly tapped 'drum sander' into the search box and found that not only was I not alone in not being able to afford one but that there was a solution. Build you own. There are numerous ideas out there but the soundest seems to be (I'll probably regret saying that, I usually do) The plan off of Dominics Woodshop. The link is provided on a blog by Yorkshire Stewart to whom I am grateful.

http://www.rockslide.org/drum%20sander.html

Scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the PLAN link

First things first what have I already got to make this a 'goer' or possibility. Well an old induction motor and pulley set

various bits of hardwood, screws etc. etc.

Most of it I've had to buy in though and I'll total it up at the end. Anyway I started off with what has become one of my favourite pasttmes, scouring the net for bargains. This turned up the pillow block bearings, steel rod and a longer pulley belt (longer than the one I had). This allowed me to size things up on the bench

The original design has a 12" wide table and drum but the 3/4" steel rod I had bought allows for a 14" table. Theres a bonus.

Most of the rest of the stuff; timber (I chose softwood its cheaper), screws, threaded rod I could buy from work (and get a 10% discount).

This shows the frame pieces cut to length. Cutting the lap joints on the tablesaw was going to take forever with a 1/8" inch blade. Dado blades seem to be hard to come by in the UK so I improvised. The depth of the arbour on my saw allowed me to double up on blades (6mm or 1/4"). I know this is risky but I asked permission from Autumn's tablesaw Gods and did it up extra tight. Stood to the side and set it running. A minor tinkling sound, which turned out to be a small piece of sycamore trapped in the guard, but no explosions or flying saw blades. I let it run for 5 minutes. Still no problems. With this setup I finished off the 26 lap/halving joints in an hour and a half. Result!

I've lined the struts the bearing blocks are mounted on (and the one the table pivots on) with whatever non-exotic hardwood I had laying about. Oak and Maple. So here's the build so far.


This has taken about three days so far but I'm on holiday this week so who cares
I admire your work.
I am saving up for one.
I have a delta open end with a feed belt.
Want to get one a little bigger someday.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
From Micro to Macro

Having thoroughly enjoyed making the Little Bess Ring Box, the smallest project I've ever made in boxes, I have decided to go to the other end of the scale. I've always hankered after a Drum Sander but could never afford the £500+ price tag. I idly tapped 'drum sander' into the search box and found that not only was I not alone in not being able to afford one but that there was a solution. Build you own. There are numerous ideas out there but the soundest seems to be (I'll probably regret saying that, I usually do) The plan off of Dominics Woodshop. The link is provided on a blog by Yorkshire Stewart to whom I am grateful.

http://www.rockslide.org/drum%20sander.html

Scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the PLAN link

First things first what have I already got to make this a 'goer' or possibility. Well an old induction motor and pulley set

various bits of hardwood, screws etc. etc.

Most of it I've had to buy in though and I'll total it up at the end. Anyway I started off with what has become one of my favourite pasttmes, scouring the net for bargains. This turned up the pillow block bearings, steel rod and a longer pulley belt (longer than the one I had). This allowed me to size things up on the bench

The original design has a 12" wide table and drum but the 3/4" steel rod I had bought allows for a 14" table. Theres a bonus.

Most of the rest of the stuff; timber (I chose softwood its cheaper), screws, threaded rod I could buy from work (and get a 10% discount).

This shows the frame pieces cut to length. Cutting the lap joints on the tablesaw was going to take forever with a 1/8" inch blade. Dado blades seem to be hard to come by in the UK so I improvised. The depth of the arbour on my saw allowed me to double up on blades (6mm or 1/4"). I know this is risky but I asked permission from Autumn's tablesaw Gods and did it up extra tight. Stood to the side and set it running. A minor tinkling sound, which turned out to be a small piece of sycamore trapped in the guard, but no explosions or flying saw blades. I let it run for 5 minutes. Still no problems. With this setup I finished off the 26 lap/halving joints in an hour and a half. Result!

I've lined the struts the bearing blocks are mounted on (and the one the table pivots on) with whatever non-exotic hardwood I had laying about. Oak and Maple. So here's the build so far.


This has taken about three days so far but I'm on holiday this week so who cares
Thanks for the encouragement A.

I keep coming across niggling 'show stoppers' but the idea that at the end of all of this I'll finally have a drum sander all of my very own is definitely worth holding on to.

Thank you all for encouraging me to 'blog'. You asked for it!

Martyn
 

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From Micro to Macro

Having thoroughly enjoyed making the Little Bess Ring Box, the smallest project I've ever made in boxes, I have decided to go to the other end of the scale. I've always hankered after a Drum Sander but could never afford the £500+ price tag. I idly tapped 'drum sander' into the search box and found that not only was I not alone in not being able to afford one but that there was a solution. Build you own. There are numerous ideas out there but the soundest seems to be (I'll probably regret saying that, I usually do) The plan off of Dominics Woodshop. The link is provided on a blog by Yorkshire Stewart to whom I am grateful.

http://www.rockslide.org/drum%20sander.html

Scroll to the bottom of the page and click on the PLAN link

First things first what have I already got to make this a 'goer' or possibility. Well an old induction motor and pulley set

various bits of hardwood, screws etc. etc.

Most of it I've had to buy in though and I'll total it up at the end. Anyway I started off with what has become one of my favourite pasttmes, scouring the net for bargains. This turned up the pillow block bearings, steel rod and a longer pulley belt (longer than the one I had). This allowed me to size things up on the bench

The original design has a 12" wide table and drum but the 3/4" steel rod I had bought allows for a 14" table. Theres a bonus.

Most of the rest of the stuff; timber (I chose softwood its cheaper), screws, threaded rod I could buy from work (and get a 10% discount).

This shows the frame pieces cut to length. Cutting the lap joints on the tablesaw was going to take forever with a 1/8" inch blade. Dado blades seem to be hard to come by in the UK so I improvised. The depth of the arbour on my saw allowed me to double up on blades (6mm or 1/4"). I know this is risky but I asked permission from Autumn's tablesaw Gods and did it up extra tight. Stood to the side and set it running. A minor tinkling sound, which turned out to be a small piece of sycamore trapped in the guard, but no explosions or flying saw blades. I let it run for 5 minutes. Still no problems. With this setup I finished off the 26 lap/halving joints in an hour and a half. Result!

I've lined the struts the bearing blocks are mounted on (and the one the table pivots on) with whatever non-exotic hardwood I had laying about. Oak and Maple. So here's the build so far.


This has taken about three days so far but I'm on holiday this week so who cares
Martyn, you are becoming quit the star on these blogs! I (like many many others) will be very much liiking forward to the out come of this blog as much as the others! Good Luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Fixing a hole

Hello again, fans of the drum sander.
Yesterday I wrestled home an 8' x 2' sheet of 3/4" MDF. I am one of those fortunate to be at school when the metric system was being introduced so I can still speak imperial, which is lucky as the plans for this thing are American in origin. The plans call for 3/4" ply for the table and drum parts but I have decided (he'll regret it he always does when he makes these assertive decisions) that MDF is going to be more appropriate for this project. Two reasons.

1. MDF has a nice flat, smooth surface. I tried oiling up an offcut

and I can see no reason this can't be used for the working surface of the table. Again the design call for a layer of Formica. Whilst this IS available here no regular outlet wants to sell you less than a 5' x 10' sheet and I can't be arsed (English slang - bothered) to grub around for an offcut, not even on Ebay. Anyway if the surface gets scuffed up, with wear, I'l put a layer of hardboard on it. If that gets trashed then (and only then) will I seek out Formica. So there.

2. The edge, when suitably sealed will be more uniform on the drum. This is made out of 20×3/4" discs of MDF.

So I cut the two boards for the table and 20 square blanks for the drum discs up. Glued up the two-layer 'table'

and proceeded to cut central holes in all 20 of the drum blanks. Merde, nous sommes European avec un systeme metric. (google translate would be good here). My capacious metric bit set has various 18mm and 20mm bits but no 19mm bit (3/4" = 19.05mm). Then I remembered my old woodwork teacher saying "Never throw an old tool away", in my head. After grubbing around for 15 minutes I found my old imperial bit stash at the back of a draw, complete with a 3/4" flat bit. Thank you Mr. Jenkins, right about so many of life's mysteries, an ex-marine woodwork teacher. Set up the drill press and holed the lot in 15 minutes.

Or from the end. I present at great expense and short notice a 15" long 3/4" hole in 20 sheets of MDF.

I've made up a jig to cut them circular, on the bandsaw.

and now I have to pluck up the courage, fettle the bandsaw and go for it.
 

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Fixing a hole

Hello again, fans of the drum sander.
Yesterday I wrestled home an 8' x 2' sheet of 3/4" MDF. I am one of those fortunate to be at school when the metric system was being introduced so I can still speak imperial, which is lucky as the plans for this thing are American in origin. The plans call for 3/4" ply for the table and drum parts but I have decided (he'll regret it he always does when he makes these assertive decisions) that MDF is going to be more appropriate for this project. Two reasons.

1. MDF has a nice flat, smooth surface. I tried oiling up an offcut

and I can see no reason this can't be used for the working surface of the table. Again the design call for a layer of Formica. Whilst this IS available here no regular outlet wants to sell you less than a 5' x 10' sheet and I can't be arsed (English slang - bothered) to grub around for an offcut, not even on Ebay. Anyway if the surface gets scuffed up, with wear, I'l put a layer of hardboard on it. If that gets trashed then (and only then) will I seek out Formica. So there.

2. The edge, when suitably sealed will be more uniform on the drum. This is made out of 20×3/4" discs of MDF.

So I cut the two boards for the table and 20 square blanks for the drum discs up. Glued up the two-layer 'table'

and proceeded to cut central holes in all 20 of the drum blanks. Merde, nous sommes European avec un systeme metric. (google translate would be good here). My capacious metric bit set has various 18mm and 20mm bits but no 19mm bit (3/4" = 19.05mm). Then I remembered my old woodwork teacher saying "Never throw an old tool away", in my head. After grubbing around for 15 minutes I found my old imperial bit stash at the back of a draw, complete with a 3/4" flat bit. Thank you Mr. Jenkins, right about so many of life's mysteries, an ex-marine woodwork teacher. Set up the drill press and holed the lot in 15 minutes.

Or from the end. I present at great expense and short notice a 15" long 3/4" hole in 20 sheets of MDF.

I've made up a jig to cut them circular, on the bandsaw.

and now I have to pluck up the courage, fettle the bandsaw and go for it.
fettle away , what !
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Fixing a hole

Hello again, fans of the drum sander.
Yesterday I wrestled home an 8' x 2' sheet of 3/4" MDF. I am one of those fortunate to be at school when the metric system was being introduced so I can still speak imperial, which is lucky as the plans for this thing are American in origin. The plans call for 3/4" ply for the table and drum parts but I have decided (he'll regret it he always does when he makes these assertive decisions) that MDF is going to be more appropriate for this project. Two reasons.

1. MDF has a nice flat, smooth surface. I tried oiling up an offcut

and I can see no reason this can't be used for the working surface of the table. Again the design call for a layer of Formica. Whilst this IS available here no regular outlet wants to sell you less than a 5' x 10' sheet and I can't be arsed (English slang - bothered) to grub around for an offcut, not even on Ebay. Anyway if the surface gets scuffed up, with wear, I'l put a layer of hardboard on it. If that gets trashed then (and only then) will I seek out Formica. So there.

2. The edge, when suitably sealed will be more uniform on the drum. This is made out of 20×3/4" discs of MDF.

So I cut the two boards for the table and 20 square blanks for the drum discs up. Glued up the two-layer 'table'

and proceeded to cut central holes in all 20 of the drum blanks. Merde, nous sommes European avec un systeme metric. (google translate would be good here). My capacious metric bit set has various 18mm and 20mm bits but no 19mm bit (3/4" = 19.05mm). Then I remembered my old woodwork teacher saying "Never throw an old tool away", in my head. After grubbing around for 15 minutes I found my old imperial bit stash at the back of a draw, complete with a 3/4" flat bit. Thank you Mr. Jenkins, right about so many of life's mysteries, an ex-marine woodwork teacher. Set up the drill press and holed the lot in 15 minutes.

Or from the end. I present at great expense and short notice a 15" long 3/4" hole in 20 sheets of MDF.

I've made up a jig to cut them circular, on the bandsaw.

and now I have to pluck up the courage, fettle the bandsaw and go for it.
lol
 

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Registered
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2,242 Posts
Fixing a hole

Hello again, fans of the drum sander.
Yesterday I wrestled home an 8' x 2' sheet of 3/4" MDF. I am one of those fortunate to be at school when the metric system was being introduced so I can still speak imperial, which is lucky as the plans for this thing are American in origin. The plans call for 3/4" ply for the table and drum parts but I have decided (he'll regret it he always does when he makes these assertive decisions) that MDF is going to be more appropriate for this project. Two reasons.

1. MDF has a nice flat, smooth surface. I tried oiling up an offcut

and I can see no reason this can't be used for the working surface of the table. Again the design call for a layer of Formica. Whilst this IS available here no regular outlet wants to sell you less than a 5' x 10' sheet and I can't be arsed (English slang - bothered) to grub around for an offcut, not even on Ebay. Anyway if the surface gets scuffed up, with wear, I'l put a layer of hardboard on it. If that gets trashed then (and only then) will I seek out Formica. So there.

2. The edge, when suitably sealed will be more uniform on the drum. This is made out of 20×3/4" discs of MDF.

So I cut the two boards for the table and 20 square blanks for the drum discs up. Glued up the two-layer 'table'

and proceeded to cut central holes in all 20 of the drum blanks. Merde, nous sommes European avec un systeme metric. (google translate would be good here). My capacious metric bit set has various 18mm and 20mm bits but no 19mm bit (3/4" = 19.05mm). Then I remembered my old woodwork teacher saying "Never throw an old tool away", in my head. After grubbing around for 15 minutes I found my old imperial bit stash at the back of a draw, complete with a 3/4" flat bit. Thank you Mr. Jenkins, right about so many of life's mysteries, an ex-marine woodwork teacher. Set up the drill press and holed the lot in 15 minutes.

Or from the end. I present at great expense and short notice a 15" long 3/4" hole in 20 sheets of MDF.

I've made up a jig to cut them circular, on the bandsaw.

and now I have to pluck up the courage, fettle the bandsaw and go for it.
LOL! I like it!!
 

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1,074 Posts
Fixing a hole

Hello again, fans of the drum sander.
Yesterday I wrestled home an 8' x 2' sheet of 3/4" MDF. I am one of those fortunate to be at school when the metric system was being introduced so I can still speak imperial, which is lucky as the plans for this thing are American in origin. The plans call for 3/4" ply for the table and drum parts but I have decided (he'll regret it he always does when he makes these assertive decisions) that MDF is going to be more appropriate for this project. Two reasons.

1. MDF has a nice flat, smooth surface. I tried oiling up an offcut

and I can see no reason this can't be used for the working surface of the table. Again the design call for a layer of Formica. Whilst this IS available here no regular outlet wants to sell you less than a 5' x 10' sheet and I can't be arsed (English slang - bothered) to grub around for an offcut, not even on Ebay. Anyway if the surface gets scuffed up, with wear, I'l put a layer of hardboard on it. If that gets trashed then (and only then) will I seek out Formica. So there.

2. The edge, when suitably sealed will be more uniform on the drum. This is made out of 20×3/4" discs of MDF.

So I cut the two boards for the table and 20 square blanks for the drum discs up. Glued up the two-layer 'table'

and proceeded to cut central holes in all 20 of the drum blanks. Merde, nous sommes European avec un systeme metric. (google translate would be good here). My capacious metric bit set has various 18mm and 20mm bits but no 19mm bit (3/4" = 19.05mm). Then I remembered my old woodwork teacher saying "Never throw an old tool away", in my head. After grubbing around for 15 minutes I found my old imperial bit stash at the back of a draw, complete with a 3/4" flat bit. Thank you Mr. Jenkins, right about so many of life's mysteries, an ex-marine woodwork teacher. Set up the drill press and holed the lot in 15 minutes.

Or from the end. I present at great expense and short notice a 15" long 3/4" hole in 20 sheets of MDF.

I've made up a jig to cut them circular, on the bandsaw.

and now I have to pluck up the courage, fettle the bandsaw and go for it.
Woodworking and several language lessons all in one! And it is not even 9 o'clock in the morning.

One of my favorite stories is about when I first moved to the Deep South and I had difficulty understanding some of the accents. Then I overheard two women discussing a man from "Anglund" and he had one a' them "ack cints."
 

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In Loving Memory
Joined
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17,103 Posts
Fixing a hole

Hello again, fans of the drum sander.
Yesterday I wrestled home an 8' x 2' sheet of 3/4" MDF. I am one of those fortunate to be at school when the metric system was being introduced so I can still speak imperial, which is lucky as the plans for this thing are American in origin. The plans call for 3/4" ply for the table and drum parts but I have decided (he'll regret it he always does when he makes these assertive decisions) that MDF is going to be more appropriate for this project. Two reasons.

1. MDF has a nice flat, smooth surface. I tried oiling up an offcut

and I can see no reason this can't be used for the working surface of the table. Again the design call for a layer of Formica. Whilst this IS available here no regular outlet wants to sell you less than a 5' x 10' sheet and I can't be arsed (English slang - bothered) to grub around for an offcut, not even on Ebay. Anyway if the surface gets scuffed up, with wear, I'l put a layer of hardboard on it. If that gets trashed then (and only then) will I seek out Formica. So there.

2. The edge, when suitably sealed will be more uniform on the drum. This is made out of 20×3/4" discs of MDF.

So I cut the two boards for the table and 20 square blanks for the drum discs up. Glued up the two-layer 'table'

and proceeded to cut central holes in all 20 of the drum blanks. Merde, nous sommes European avec un systeme metric. (google translate would be good here). My capacious metric bit set has various 18mm and 20mm bits but no 19mm bit (3/4" = 19.05mm). Then I remembered my old woodwork teacher saying "Never throw an old tool away", in my head. After grubbing around for 15 minutes I found my old imperial bit stash at the back of a draw, complete with a 3/4" flat bit. Thank you Mr. Jenkins, right about so many of life's mysteries, an ex-marine woodwork teacher. Set up the drill press and holed the lot in 15 minutes.

Or from the end. I present at great expense and short notice a 15" long 3/4" hole in 20 sheets of MDF.

I've made up a jig to cut them circular, on the bandsaw.

and now I have to pluck up the courage, fettle the bandsaw and go for it.
I used to speak Anglush Mary Anne, but now I've gone over to the universal language, 'Nonsense'.

I agree with you Martyn that the mdf should do fine. It is after all what the drum is made out of, so why not the table too. If you screw on the hardboard it would be easy to replace as required. I will be interested to see if the use of a soft wood frame will make any difference (I'm not inferring here that it will). It should be ok with the lap joint construction. I hope you follow up with a review after you have used it a year or so.
 
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