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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Drafting Desk part 2

Woodworking,wood,Chris Adkins,High Rock WoodworkingLast week I talked about the drafting desk that I am currently working on. I have made a lot of progress and now have all of the parts made and partially put together. Over the weekend my wife and I went up to North Carolina to spend Easter with our families. I took the opportunity to work in my fathers shop a little. If any of you read my blog "Old School v. New School" I spoke about how I grew up working in his shop but now have adapted my style around the space I have available at home. The last piece of the table I needed to make was the top so I decide to take advantage of the 24" planer while I was there.
After finishing the top I spent some time just looking around. Writing on this blog has made me spend more time thinking of the experiences I have had. Looking around I was amazed at some of the tools I took for granted that I have always had access to. I would love to write an entry based off of my father shop sometime.
This week I plan on putting the rest of the parts together and prepping everything for finish. I must say that finishing has always been my weak point and I am going outside of my realm of comfort on this project and trying a combination of dye and stain. The project is made of White Oak, I am using a Mahogany water based dye with an Early American oil based stain over it and finishing with a wipe on poly. I have made several test boards and like the results, so I am excited about getting started.
I will post more soon on my progress.

Chris Adkins

http://highrockwoodworking.blogspot.com

[email protected]

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Ready for Finish!



I have finally finished the woodworking part of the drafting desk and am now ready for the finishing. I believe it turning out pretty well.

I do have a funny story about putting the top together. I have said before that usually work on larger boards up at my fathers shop in North Carolina. I decided to make the top up there as it would be easier to make and my wife and I were driving up for the weekend from Atlanta anyway. I had all of the boards for the top jointed and the biscuits cut when I realized that I didn't have any glue. My father said that he would borrow some from a guy next door who also builds furniture. After finishing and getting back to Atlanta I notice a few days later that the boards were coming apart! I called my father and he said that as he was walking out the door with the glue the guy call out to not use the glue below forty degrees, dad just ignored him thinking the Elmer's wood glue he always used seemed to be okay even below forty, but it seems this one was not. I am still not sure what kind of glue it was but it reminded me of the old saying to never go on a hunt with an untried firearm. I ended up just making another top but I did lose time in having to redo it.

I will start applying the dye this weekend and will post more with an update on how things are coming.

Visit my blog for more pictures of this project at http://highrockwoodworking.blogspot.com.

Also check out my podcast which can be listened to directly from my site or search High Rock Woodworking in itunes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Finished Drafting Desk!


I just finished my drafting/desk and finally brought it into the house this evening. This was a great project to make and there were two new techniques I used on this project, so I learned a lot. As part of the design for this desk I decided that I wanted a slight taper and curve to the legs and I wanted a deep red Mahogany color.

After making a template for the legs I contemplated how to cut each leg out, the fastest way would have been to either use a flush trim bit with a router against my template or just freehand with a band saw. However, with only 1/2" difference from the top of the leg to the bottom and a 3/8" arch for the curve, I decided to just mark each leg and use my block plane. I had just purchased a new block plane and was looking forward to trying it out, cutting the legs out was a great opportunity for me to spend some time seeing how I liked the plane. The block plane I purchased was the Stanley Sweetheart number 9 1/2 block plane, I have been a little reluctant about these planes as I tend to lean towards the Veritas or Lie Nielsen but decided to give it a try and was very pleased with how the plane handled. The blade is pretty heavy and the plane has an adjustable mouth although it does not adjust as close to the blade as I would like. At any rate the plane handled well and I really enjoyed cutting out the legs by hand. There is just something that is very peaceful about working by hand.

Click here to read the rest of this article: http://highrockwoodworking.com
 
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