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So the short story of this is: my wife has asked me to make her a nail polish box and after some research I've decided to use a 1/2" dovetail bit that I got this morning…

And I've made no real progress not even a workable test cut…is this beyond my skill level….?.

I've found a set of instructions. http://www.routerworkshop.com/boxjoints.html where this guy is using a 3/8" face as a "spacer" but my problem is that the spacer keeps moving and thus not giving me a accurate dovetail…I've clamoed the spacer at each side of my table but it moves at the critical point where the stock meets phew bit…..

Also the im getting a lot of blowout part of the dovetail is breaking off…
Really stuck* at this point and its my first real project on my self buIlt router table and cabinet…..
 

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Just because a technique is on You tube doesn't mean it's a good technique . It might help to post a link to the You tube video Your trying to follow or photos of your attempt or both. Another alternative might be to use box joints instead.
 

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You might have better luck with a Keller dovetail jig. It is an aluminum bar that guides the router.
Porter cable makes a dovetail jig that solves the problems you mention (4210 for half blind dovetails, or the 4212 for through dovetails).
 

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This is one of those things where by the time you shop for and buy the bit, build a jig, set up the jig, and get the method working; you could have hand cut the dovetails tens times over. To try and help though, the spacer appears to only be used before clamping the piece to a backer board, not during the cut. The backer board will also help prevent tearout on the backside. Is that the way you are doing it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I just realised that the instructions that I was reading was for completing a box joint using a straight router bit…..IVE BEEN USING A 1/2" DOVETAIL BIT…..I have some choice words for myself at the moment!!!!!!
 

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I wouldn't even attempt making dovetails on a router table without an Incra jig, and even then, it's not easy. Routed dovetails need to be extremely precise to get a good fit.
 

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I wouldn t even attempt making dovetails on a router table without an Incra jig, and even then, it s not easy. Routed dovetails need to be extremely precise to get a good fit.

- Ger21
+1 for what Ger21 said….You need a good dovetail jig, like MLCS, P.C., Leigh, etc. to make good, tightfitting dovetails….Forget the router table for that…You can always make boxjoints, finger joints, etc. on your tablesaw w/ a homemade jig…..You use a handheld router with these jigs to cut dovetails…......
 

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This is one of those things where by the time you shop for and buy the bit, build a jig, set up the jig, and get the method working; you could have hand cut the dovetails tens times over.
+1 to this, but I may be biased because I don't own a jig. I did a lot of practice pieces, and I just built a wall box for drill bits, and hand cut the dovetails. They could be tighter, but they work. Took me about an hour to lay out and cut them all, I'm sure more experienced people could probably do it in 10 minutes.
 

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I bought a dovetail jig from peachtree woodworking this March.
You can either use it with a router table or by itself.
I have only used it as a stand alone setup and having never cutting a dove tail, it came out perfect the first time.
In order to do it on a router table, you just do it upside down. The setup is exactly the same.
The idea behind their jig is you are using router bits with bearing guides and there isn't any alignment to do except for centering the wood onto the jig. Once that is done, you just cut the pins and tails, with the dovetail bit and the straight bit. They both have bearings on them.
I have 2 older Craftsman routers and just keep the bits mounted on the 2 routers.
I made about 6 drawers for a project this summer and they all came out great.
 
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