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See the below image. This came in an email from Jet. Is it just me, or does the guy in the photo appear to be doing something just a little unsafe? Hand on the table right in front of the blade, and leaning into it? I doubt the saw is running and the guy is a model and not a woodworker and is just standing like the photographer told him to stand, but you would think Jet should not use photos like this. At least he's wearing safety glasses.

Poster Font Advertising Publication Photo caption
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That's a good point Ed! I'm also sure the saw isn't even running. But it's the point of the photo. Don't lean on your table saw, and especially don't lean on it with your hand in front of the blade!
 

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I also find it interesting the side of the blade that the fence is on. I occasionally use my fence on the other side, but usually only for bevel cuts. Oh well, leave it to the likes of us to be picky :)
 

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Ripthorn's comment gets me thinking - my machine has a left-mount guard that I stand behind, so I work from the side of the machine. I wonder, if I ever have to change, whether I'd be comfortable working on the right. It seems so … foreign. (Actually, I don't think I've ever stood directly in front of my machine. That also seems a weird place to be.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
On my Sawstop (as I'm sure most table saws) you can put the fence on either side of the blade. However, I think most put it to the right side of the blade. My extension table is on that side so for bigger cuts I wouldn't have a choice. So I stand on the opposite side of the blade from the fence, and whenever possible I try and make sure I'm not in front of the material where a kickback would get me in the stomach, but you can't always avoid that depending on how big the material is.

The reason this photo caught my eye is because I in fact tested my Sawstop using my thumb and it worked just as advertised. That seemed to me the best way to learn how to be safe around the table saw is to screw up one time and it really gets your attention. If I didn't have the Sawstop I'd only be cable of giving one thumb up right now instead of two thumbs up!
 

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When I look at that picture it drives me crazy too. The fence is on the wrong side of the blade, and nobody that actually uses a saw works like that. I'm sure the ad agency uses a photographer to set up the shot w/ models, lighting experts, etc. neither of whom know anything about woodworking so that is the result. A totally fine photograph that has great artistic composition, perfectly exposed and lighted , perfect depth of field but doesn't make any sense to the users of the product.
 

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It does not look to me like the board would contact
the blade at the present fence setting.

I will admit to marking a board, and setting the
fence to the mark on some of the saws I've
used which lacked scales or had sliding rails
that needed recalibration when moved.

That sort of set-up visual checking sort of
looks like what's going on here.

Anyway, it clearly doesn't represent a real
working method. I think it's just a compositional
posturing of the model and saw to fit the
ad layout.
 

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How about if the user is left handed, his postition and board placement would be correct, but limited in width because of the limited left side fence placement. Other than leaning on the table, I see nothing wrong with what he's doing. He's clear of a kickback, and doing what would be natural for a lefty.
Sometimes I'll make raised panels on my saw using a tall fearther board set up on the right side of the blade. The fence is on the left of the blade as my it tilts right. Being right handed, I don't like it at all. An audible sigh of relief is emitted when the last cut is made. ...... Jerry (in Tucson)
 

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I think they flipped the photo because the watch is on his "right" arm. Most people wear watches on left arm.

Also who said he's making a cut? Maybe he's adjusting the fence… looking to see where the blade is in relation to his mark?
 
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