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Hello Saw Builders,
I picked up an 1880's (about) Disston 14" backsaw on Ebay, when it arrived I was a little disappointed in the amount of pitting on the blade. I was wondering if anyone could tell me if this saw plate is worth saving? I've tried sanding with 80 grit, and using a coarse wire wheel, the pitting seems to be pretty deep. There's no etch that I can see, so I didn't feel bad trying to get agressvie.

On the plus side, the handle and back are in great condition, so even if the plate needs to be junked, or turned into a card scraper, I can experiment with making my own saw plate.





 

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Kinda stinks that the little bit of pitting is at the tooth line. Id say it depends on what style you intend to use it as, rip or xcut. If its sharpened rip the pitting wouldnt be a huge deal. Sharpened xcut and it may be an issue. Its a good lookin saw, keep us up to date on the rehab.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys, I think I'm going to go with making a new plate, I ordered a Shim Stock Strip, Blue Tempered Spring Steel, .020" Thick, 6" x 25" from www.mcmaster.com. I checked the old plate with my calipers, seems like that is the right thickness. I finished sanding the handle and put a light coat of BLO, and it looks great so far. I'll keep the old saw plate for now and might try going after it again at a later date.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
So here it is, the finished product. Drilling the holes through the steel had to be the hardest part, even with a cobalt bit. Once I got that part done, the rest was too easy. I printed off a 10 PPI template and taped it to the saw plate. My hacksaw wasn't doing the job cutting the notches, so I used my dremel with a diamond cutting wheel to -carefully- cut out a notch for each tooth that my saw file could fit into. An hour later, I had the teeth shaped, jointed, set and sharpened. It made some good test cuts on a piece of oak I had lying around, rip and crosscut.






 
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