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I am in the market for a table saw. It will be used for projects around my house here in Denver, CO. I currently don't have any kind of table saw.

My work space is an old horse shed I've converted to my work shed. Uninsulated 1/2" pine walls and roof, only 3 walls, dirt floors, a small leak here and there. It is wired with a single 110V line. Due to cost constraints, it can't be wired for 220V. Consequently, I've been looking at contractor and hybrid saws. I would love to have a full size cabinet saw, but such a piece of machinery is not feasible at this point for me.

I am keeping on eye on Craigslist for a good deal on used saw, but, I wouldn't mind a riving knife so I am also looking at new saws.

As far as new saws go, doing my internet research, I had zeroed in on the Grizzly G0748, but it was discontinued before I got a chance to pull the trigger. It had table mounted trunnions, weighed 286lbs, and despite a few alignment complaints, was generally well regarded.

The two hybrid saws now in the Grizzly line-up are the G0715P and the new-for-2014 G0771. The '771 is still too new to have any detailed user reviews on the internet.

Can anyone speak to the differences between the '715P and the '771? From what I can tells, the '715P weighs 393lbs while the '771 weighs 286lbs. The '715P has table mounted trunnions and the '771 has the preferable cabinet mounted trunnions. The 715P does not have a motor brake, the 771 does.

Is the new '771 a redesigned '748, with the trunnions mounting points reworked from the table to the cabinet? Anything else? It seems the cabinet mounted trunnions of the '771 would make it the obvious choice over the '715P . . . ? Am I missing something?
 

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The G0715P has a better stock fence, and a motor that draws slightly more amperage. Even though it's possible to run it on a 120v circuit, the motor draws more amps which taxes the circuit a bit more. Grizzly's website includes this clause : NOTICE: *110V operation requires part #T23999 circuit breaker and wiring procedures that must be completed by an electrician or other qualified service personnel. See Owner's Manual for details.
 

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The G0715P has a better stock fence, and a motor that draws slightly more amperage. Even though it s possible to run it on a 120v circuit, the motor draws more amps which taxes the circuit a bit more. Grizzly s website includes this clause : NOTICE: *110V operation requires part #T23999 circuit breaker and wiring procedures that must be completed by an electrician or other qualified service personnel. See Owner's Manual for details.
That is a no-issue. The voltage conversion kit costs around $6 or so and is easy. The specifications for G0715P list a bit higher current but also they say 110V while the G0771 specs list a bit less current but on 120V. I guess both motors put the same load on the circuit as essentially they are the same 2HP motors.
 

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I am in the market for a table saw. It will be used for projects around my house here in Denver, CO. I currently don t have any kind of table saw.

My work space is an old horse shed I ve converted to my work shed. Uninsulated 1/2" pine walls and roof, only 3 walls, dirt floors, a small leak here and there. It is wired with a single 110V line. Due to cost constraints, it can t be wired for 220V.
Not to derail the conversation with unsolicited advice and not sure if your constraint is due to parts or labor, but… I recently found myself in need of 220V power and got some very high quotes for just adding an outlet close to the breaker panel.

I paid $40 for two residential wiring books (and downloaded the NEC handbook for free) and less than $50 in parts to add a 40A 220V circuit for a welder. When I needed additional 220V circuits I spent about $120 for a subpanel and I now have space for 4 220V circuits and 6-8 20A 110V circuits.

I didn't know anything about home wiring when I started but after reading the books (and rereading some chapters a couple times) it's actually pretty simple to do it yourself if you're willing to invest a little time to learn, follow the rules and take your time making the changes. And it's very empowering to have the flexibility to do it yourself going forward.

That said, it sounds like you may want to look at what's already going on electrically in that shed. The way I read your message, you probably don't have a subpanel in the horse shed if you've only got a single 110V circuit going out there. Personally, I'd make sure the existing wiring is done properly (subpanel with it's own grounding wire to a properly sized grounding rod dedicated to that building, GFCI breakers for garage/outdoor circuits, etc.). It would suck to experience a lightning strike or a short to ground out there and have the only intended path to ground be a long 14 gauge wire going to the panel back in the house.
 

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Hi Guys,

After being sidetrack by multiple projects, I am back in the hunt for a hybrid table saw.

A fair amount of time has passed since I first posted, anyone got any more info to add to the discussion comparing the G0715P to the newer G0771?

I've read/watched a few of the recent reviews, and it generally sounds like the G0715P is a better built heavier unit than the G0771, but the G0771 offers cabinet mounted trunions with the much easier blade/miter slot alignment.

Any other points worth mentioning between the two.

Any other brands/models worth considering?
 

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