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I inquired about this problem on my Ridgid. Pretty uniformly responses are to use a thick quality blade and go slow. I took off my 80 tooth Diablo thin kerf and put on a Ridge Carbide 40 tooth. Not quite as smooth as it is not the right tooth for a miter saw, but sure enough, my compound miter was strait not curved. Saving up for an appropriate miter blade. Thick kerf, 80 tooth and low hook.
 

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Framing only? Don't buy that as they are intended for trim work too. Crown mouldings etc.

The slower I cut, the straighter the cut. Clamping helped. Watched the video and will check that on my Ridgid. I don;t buy all of what he says as if the wings are off, then any long board will be off.
 

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OK, checked ny saw. Center table was about half a thou high on one edge. A bit if work with a diamond block ( we woodworkers of course have them) and I am flat to less than half a thou. Barely passes light. Side tables were uniformly low but flat. Low by dead on two layers of foil tape on one side, one on the other. Now, less than a thou end to end.

Lower fence was dead 90 degrees, but I had to put a thumb on it to get both ends in line to no light gap. Alignment of the blade to the center slot was dead on, so aligning the fence to 90 to the blade was easy, confirmed by flipping a cut.

But, upper fences were setback by 20 thou at least and tilted forward by at least half a degree! That is not going to cause curved cuts, but sure could throw the angle off. Fortunately, correcting is removing material from the upright, so I will do that tomorrow.

FWIW, to support long boards, my saw sits fixed to cabinets and I have blocks ( not exactly a 4×4 ) to be very much level with the saw. More level than a bit of crown that's for sure.

This video was talking thousands of an inch when we are talking baseboard and crown. If the cut is strait, we can deal with ten times that. Maybe not making doll house furniture but I would not be using a 10 inch power saw to do that anyway.

Last bit, my old first generation Delta non-compound was flat in the center and lower on both sides by about the same as the Ridgid. I propose that is intentional. It is still amazing how a spinning blade can make a curved cut.

I am betting this will not have any effect on the curve cuts I was getting, but always nice to know one's tool is as good as you can get it.
 

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OK worked a bit with a 19th century milling machine ( file) on my fences. Not perfect, but far better. Actually, before is one step better than it really was. It also skewed away from the fence closer to the blade. Again, better, not perfect. All out of old crown so nothing to test exactly, but I'll do some compounds to see if the are any straighter and closer to 90 degrees. Lunch first. Still tempted to just go to a jig and sell the Ridged. My old Delta seems more rigid than a Ridgid.

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