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I have to make (15) 6 1/2" X 6 1/2" post caps that contain a pyramid cut at the top. I have ripped the lumber that I work with creating two sides of the pyrmaid. Now I have to cut my stock down to 6 1/2" therefore I will have a 6 1/2" X 6 1/2" piece. My manager made one on a tablesaw but the blade was at max exposure and set at a 12 degree bevel. I would like to keep my fingers and hands if at all possible and don't feel totally comfortable doing it this way. Anyone have suggetions? I hope I haven't confused you with my explanation. I used a stock image to give you an idea of what I am working with.
 

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Noramlly I would leave the stock longe enough to cut the primid on the end of the stock on the 12' chop saw after I cut it off and make another when complete you router the edges. Since they are already cut I would argree with bentlyj's idea about a sled or sanding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well I went and talked to the owner of the company I work for. He came out and showed me how to do it on the table saw. He gave me a little pep talk about what it was like the first time he had ever made them and that really motivated me. I ended up doing them on the table saw and I still have all of my fingers and hands. Made it through it with a sigh of relief!


 

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My past experience with Fir, Cedar, Pine and Oak, they split/check along the grain often within 5 yrs. Raw linseed oil helps, (added a couple yrs pre splitting) but takes forever to absorb/dry. The trim below, even when glued at the joints and nailed still pull apart. More often than not the fence is baked in full sun and the property owners don't or rarely maintain the product.
 

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A way to make that cut safer and less scary is to clamp the blocks with an old fashioned hand screw (the kind you used in high school shop, with the wooden jaws). Stand the block on edge, or on the side, as appropriate, hold it against the fence, rest the wooden jaws on top of the fence (lying horizontally and at a right angle to the fence), and clamp the block firmly. Now you have a solid grip on the block, and can easily keep your hands away from the blade.

I do this often when I'm feeling uneasy about pushing small stuff through the saw, especially with the blade raised so high. Much less chance of a kickback, too.
 
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