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I suspect that the wood was not in equilibrium with the environment that the cutting board was being used in. Change in moisture can cause this type of wood movement.
 

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Did you oil both sides before you gave it to them? If so, perhaps they washed it enough with soap and used it enough to deplete the oils on the top, and the top dried out, while the bottom did not lose oil.
 

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A friend f mine brought an end grain board to me recently that was at least this bad. He wanted me to "fix" it! I simply laid it on my work bench for 2 weeks and it pretty much flattened out! He could not believe I did nothing to it and I don't think he will be storing it over his sink anymore! It had been made to fit that sink and even though the guy that made it warned him, he did not properly care for it! It was pretty much wet all the time! Wish I had taken pics but, I didn't think of that at the time! It had mineral oil and bees wax on it or so he said so it would have messed up a lot of sandpaper!!!!
 

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I had one do that. I think it was because the user washed it, then laid it flat on his counter. The moisture was able to evaporate from the top, but not the bottom. I suggested he stand it on edge until it had completely dried (overnight) and the problem went away. HTH
 

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My wife left ours set in a puddle of water over night. Next morning, I had an end grain bowl. Put it in the oven on the lowest setting (around 170 degrees) and it flattened itself out after several hours.
 
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