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Just finished a maple gaming table and the top has a pretty big cup to it. Kind of hard to describe the table. It's two 3×5 tops connected by counterflap hinges. the bottom is on an off center swivel so it pivots then opens to a 5×6 table. both tops are 6/4 maple finished on both sides. After I finished it all i put it together and the tops sat flat on each other. It sat overnight in my truck to deliver the next day and when I set it back up again at the customers house the top had a 1/4" cup to it. Figured it would settle down after a few days but it's been a week and it's still cupped. Thinking about clamping the corners and giving it another week to see what happens. Any other ideas?
 

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Bummer is right.

Assuming the wood was properly dry, then something about the environment changed and/or something relating to exposed surfaces came into play.

When you lay panels on top of each other one surface is exposed while the other is not. The exposed surface will respond to changes in atmosphere by either drying out or taking on moisture. You can see this happen quickly just bet some lumber and lay it out in the sun you can practically watch it warp.

If your truck was parked outside the shop, that was the problem. The humidity usually goes up at night and early morning. If you had bagged them or wrapped them in plastic you probably would have avoided it. You can also store them upright so both surfaces are exposed and can react.

I know this isn't going to solve your problem, but I offer it from my own experience just so some might understand how storing your project during a project is extremely important.

The only thing I can think of is take the tops back to the shop, remove the finish and moisten the concave (dished in) surface. Then lay the concave wet side down and expose the convex surface to lights or place a fan blowing across the surface. You may have to wet the underside a few more times

See what happens but after a couple days of this I wouldn't be optimistic in wood of this thickness.
 
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