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I am about to build a cross cut sled to cut miters. My question is can you raise the saw blade slowly into the cross cut base when the blade is tilted to 45 degrees like you would with the blade at 90 degrees? I would think if would be easier to attach the rear fence square to the blade kerf in the base if you could rase the blade into the base. What have others done?
 

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After rereading your note, I think I misunderstood your question. I thought you were asking how I put the first 45 degree cut into the sled after it was made. For that I raised the blade incrementally and did several passes. The blade at 45 degrees can be raised incrementally just as it can when the blade is at 90 degrees, at least on my (former) Delta contractors saw. When I use the sled subsequently, I just raise the 45 degree tilted blade enough to pass through the stock I'm cutting, and I do the cuts in one pass. Maybe I'm still missing you point. If so, let me know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks! I have already built the super-sled from John Nixon. But was interested in cutting miters on things like box sides. This requires that you lay the side flat and tilt the blade. I have been trying to do this with my miter gauge but have had difficulty getting the miters accurate so the box fits together correctly. I was thinking a well built and set up sled could hlep with this. Those box makers maybe able to help. How do you get the accuracy you need?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
StLouisWoodworker; Thanks, I appreciate your feed back. I was thinking if I could raise the blade slowly into the base like I did with the blade at 90 degrees and not cut completely through the base front to back then I could square the back fense to the kerf, clamp it and then screw it down. After the back fense (closest to the opperator) and the front fense are attached you could run the blade through the entire base including the fenses. I thought that this method would eliminate the need to shim the back fense to make it square to the kerf. I also ran accross a posting (I think it was at the Folding Rule site that made the rear fense adjustable to tweek for square. Maybe thiis or the shimming method would be the best way to go. Any other thoughts?
 

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Woodwizard,
You can by the one sold at Harbor Freight for pretty cheap, I paid $10 when it was on sale. You can spend a lot of money buying a very accurate one, but for most of the time in tool setup, the dial gauge is used to measure difference in distance or delta value. At that point, accuracy is less important and a $10 one is good enough.
 
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