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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane No. 619.3730

Hello everyone. I hope you all are doing well.

This blog entry is about a Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane. You can watch a demonstration here if you'd like.

Tool Bicycle part Motor vehicle Font Auto part

Hand tool Tool Font Automotive tire Metalworking hand tool


From what I could find, this plane was made for Craftsman by Sargent and Company sometime before 1964. The 619, at the front of the model number, indicates that it was made by Sargent and Company. Please let me know if I am incorrect on that.

Handwriting Finger Gesture Wood Thumb


This hand plane was purchased quite a while back at a local antiques mall for $40. Given the condition of the plane, I was glad to pay this price. Especially since the plane came with all the major components. The only thing it lacked was the rod for the fence. I was able to make one that works well.

Finger Gesture Nail Thumb Bumper


Not knowing what the original looked like, I simply cut a slot in the end for a common screw driver.

Hand Finger Gesture Tool Thumb


The spur (knicker) for this plane differs from other rabbeting planes in that it is round.

Automotive tire Tire Wood Bumper Finger


Here is how the instructions tell you to set the spur.

Font Office supplies Parallel Paper Paper product


I found this to be problematic when using the plane in a cross-grain application (the spur is not needed when making a rabbet with the grain). The spur seemed to extend below the surface of the plane sole too much, nearly 1/8".

This picture shows what I mean.
Tool Bumper Hand tool Automotive wheel system Gas


This doesn't allow the iron to engage with the material the way it should. So, I used the spur to score the fibers of the material, then I disengaged the spur.

Wood Gesture Flooring Floor Wood stain


With the surface fibers sufficiently scored, I was able to make a cross-grain rabbet with no problem.

Saw Wood Tool Gas Power tool


The above picture shows a rabbet with the grain and across the grain. The rabbet made with the grain was fairly typical so nothing needs to be said about that.

Where to start a rabbet cut seems to be up for debate.

Do you start at the end of the board and work your way to the front?

Wood Vise Saw Gas Pneumatic tool


Or, do you start at the front and work toward the end?

Table Wood Textile Tool Rectangle


I personally don't think it matters. But, I would like to know your thoughts. Which method do you use and why?

What about the plane iron? Should it be absolutely flush with the side of the plane body or should it be slightly proud of the surface?

Calipers Wood Tool Gesture Bumper


This too seems to be a personal preference.

With all of that being said, and I'm sure that I could prattle on much longer about it, I'm glad that I bought this Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane. I wasn't able to find very much about this model online so if you have one I'd like to hear about it.

Do you even own a rabbeting plane? This exact model or another? What has been your experience?

Thank you so much for your time. God bless.
 

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Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane No. 619.3730

Hello everyone. I hope you all are doing well.

This blog entry is about a Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane. You can watch a demonstration here if you'd like.

Tool Bicycle part Motor vehicle Font Auto part

Hand tool Tool Font Automotive tire Metalworking hand tool


From what I could find, this plane was made for Craftsman by Sargent and Company sometime before 1964. The 619, at the front of the model number, indicates that it was made by Sargent and Company. Please let me know if I am incorrect on that.

Handwriting Finger Gesture Wood Thumb


This hand plane was purchased quite a while back at a local antiques mall for $40. Given the condition of the plane, I was glad to pay this price. Especially since the plane came with all the major components. The only thing it lacked was the rod for the fence. I was able to make one that works well.

Finger Gesture Nail Thumb Bumper


Not knowing what the original looked like, I simply cut a slot in the end for a common screw driver.

Hand Finger Gesture Tool Thumb


The spur (knicker) for this plane differs from other rabbeting planes in that it is round.

Automotive tire Tire Wood Bumper Finger


Here is how the instructions tell you to set the spur.

Font Office supplies Parallel Paper Paper product


I found this to be problematic when using the plane in a cross-grain application (the spur is not needed when making a rabbet with the grain). The spur seemed to extend below the surface of the plane sole too much, nearly 1/8".

This picture shows what I mean.
Tool Bumper Hand tool Automotive wheel system Gas


This doesn't allow the iron to engage with the material the way it should. So, I used the spur to score the fibers of the material, then I disengaged the spur.

Wood Gesture Flooring Floor Wood stain


With the surface fibers sufficiently scored, I was able to make a cross-grain rabbet with no problem.

Saw Wood Tool Gas Power tool


The above picture shows a rabbet with the grain and across the grain. The rabbet made with the grain was fairly typical so nothing needs to be said about that.

Where to start a rabbet cut seems to be up for debate.

Do you start at the end of the board and work your way to the front?

Wood Vise Saw Gas Pneumatic tool


Or, do you start at the front and work toward the end?

Table Wood Textile Tool Rectangle


I personally don't think it matters. But, I would like to know your thoughts. Which method do you use and why?

What about the plane iron? Should it be absolutely flush with the side of the plane body or should it be slightly proud of the surface?

Calipers Wood Tool Gesture Bumper


This too seems to be a personal preference.

With all of that being said, and I'm sure that I could prattle on much longer about it, I'm glad that I bought this Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane. I wasn't able to find very much about this model online so if you have one I'd like to hear about it.

Do you even own a rabbeting plane? This exact model or another? What has been your experience?

Thank you so much for your time. God bless.
I learned on combination planes, so I almost always start at the exit end of the rabbet, and work my way back to full length. Easier to control, I find.

If the Plane iron is perfectly flush with the side of the body, it's very easy to have the wall of your rabbet angle slightly out (the width of the cut will get narrower as you get deeper into it). Leaving the blade just a hair proud will prevent that.

I've got the Veritas skew rabbet plane. Plus 3/4 and 1-1/4 wooden rabbet planes (plus a 5/8 wide one I made myself). And a Clifton shoulder plane. And the Veritas Combination Plane. Oh, and a Luban 034 grooving plane that I frequently use for 1/4 inch rabbets for box bottoms (that's how it's set up 90% of the time).
 

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Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane No. 619.3730

Hello everyone. I hope you all are doing well.

This blog entry is about a Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane. You can watch a demonstration here if you'd like.

Tool Bicycle part Motor vehicle Font Auto part

Hand tool Tool Font Automotive tire Metalworking hand tool


From what I could find, this plane was made for Craftsman by Sargent and Company sometime before 1964. The 619, at the front of the model number, indicates that it was made by Sargent and Company. Please let me know if I am incorrect on that.

Handwriting Finger Gesture Wood Thumb


This hand plane was purchased quite a while back at a local antiques mall for $40. Given the condition of the plane, I was glad to pay this price. Especially since the plane came with all the major components. The only thing it lacked was the rod for the fence. I was able to make one that works well.

Finger Gesture Nail Thumb Bumper


Not knowing what the original looked like, I simply cut a slot in the end for a common screw driver.

Hand Finger Gesture Tool Thumb


The spur (knicker) for this plane differs from other rabbeting planes in that it is round.

Automotive tire Tire Wood Bumper Finger


Here is how the instructions tell you to set the spur.

Font Office supplies Parallel Paper Paper product


I found this to be problematic when using the plane in a cross-grain application (the spur is not needed when making a rabbet with the grain). The spur seemed to extend below the surface of the plane sole too much, nearly 1/8".

This picture shows what I mean.
Tool Bumper Hand tool Automotive wheel system Gas


This doesn't allow the iron to engage with the material the way it should. So, I used the spur to score the fibers of the material, then I disengaged the spur.

Wood Gesture Flooring Floor Wood stain


With the surface fibers sufficiently scored, I was able to make a cross-grain rabbet with no problem.



The above picture shows a rabbet with the grain and across the grain. The rabbet made with the grain was fairly typical so nothing needs to be said about that.

Where to start a rabbet cut seems to be up for debate.

Do you start at the end of the board and work your way to the front?



Or, do you start at the front and work toward the end?



I personally don't think it matters. But, I would like to know your thoughts. Which method do you use and why?

What about the plane iron? Should it be absolutely flush with the side of the plane body or should it be slightly proud of the surface?



This too seems to be a personal preference.

With all of that being said, and I'm sure that I could prattle on much longer about it, I'm glad that I bought this Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane. I wasn't able to find very much about this model online so if you have one I'd like to hear about it.

Do you even own a rabbeting plane? This exact model or another? What has been your experience?

Thank you so much for your time. God bless.
Looks like a great deal for this plane, the pricing was definitely in your favor.

I'm in the middle of a cabinet project at present which requires dados for shelves. I'm using a wooden body dado plane also with knicker, actually double knicker for each side, and if adjusted to make clean sides, the knicker is a fraction of a hair wider or proud of the cutting iron. Otherwise, like Dave said, the side wall creeps in rather than staying perfectly vertical. Sometimes I also like you, remove the knicker once I've scored across the grain, and even deepen the score with a utility knife. This works for me, just a preference. This all holds true for my wooden body rabbet plane as well.

As for where to start the cut, also like Dave, I prefer to start at the exit end of push direction and slowly work back to the start. I feel I gain better control this way, because I have a tendency when starting at the opposite to go all the way in one push, and that's where things go astray.

In any event, nice find on the plane, it should serve you well.
 

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Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane No. 619.3730

Hello everyone. I hope you all are doing well.

This blog entry is about a Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane. You can watch a demonstration here if you'd like.

Tool Bicycle part Motor vehicle Font Auto part

Hand tool Tool Font Automotive tire Metalworking hand tool


From what I could find, this plane was made for Craftsman by Sargent and Company sometime before 1964. The 619, at the front of the model number, indicates that it was made by Sargent and Company. Please let me know if I am incorrect on that.

Handwriting Finger Gesture Wood Thumb


This hand plane was purchased quite a while back at a local antiques mall for $40. Given the condition of the plane, I was glad to pay this price. Especially since the plane came with all the major components. The only thing it lacked was the rod for the fence. I was able to make one that works well.

Finger Gesture Nail Thumb Bumper


Not knowing what the original looked like, I simply cut a slot in the end for a common screw driver.

Hand Finger Gesture Tool Thumb


The spur (knicker) for this plane differs from other rabbeting planes in that it is round.

Automotive tire Tire Wood Bumper Finger


Here is how the instructions tell you to set the spur.

Font Office supplies Parallel Paper Paper product


I found this to be problematic when using the plane in a cross-grain application (the spur is not needed when making a rabbet with the grain). The spur seemed to extend below the surface of the plane sole too much, nearly 1/8".

This picture shows what I mean.
Tool Bumper Hand tool Automotive wheel system Gas


This doesn't allow the iron to engage with the material the way it should. So, I used the spur to score the fibers of the material, then I disengaged the spur.

Wood Gesture Flooring Floor Wood stain


With the surface fibers sufficiently scored, I was able to make a cross-grain rabbet with no problem.

Saw Wood Tool Gas Power tool


The above picture shows a rabbet with the grain and across the grain. The rabbet made with the grain was fairly typical so nothing needs to be said about that.

Where to start a rabbet cut seems to be up for debate.

Do you start at the end of the board and work your way to the front?

Wood Vise Saw Gas Pneumatic tool


Or, do you start at the front and work toward the end?

Table Wood Textile Tool Rectangle


I personally don't think it matters. But, I would like to know your thoughts. Which method do you use and why?

What about the plane iron? Should it be absolutely flush with the side of the plane body or should it be slightly proud of the surface?

Calipers Wood Tool Gesture Bumper


This too seems to be a personal preference.

With all of that being said, and I'm sure that I could prattle on much longer about it, I'm glad that I bought this Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane. I wasn't able to find very much about this model online so if you have one I'd like to hear about it.

Do you even own a rabbeting plane? This exact model or another? What has been your experience?

Thank you so much for your time. God bless.
Nice find.
good (essential?) reading:
https://paulsellers.com/2016/05/rebate-plane-no1-78-filletster-plane/
https://paulsellers.com/2016/05/rebate-plane-1-closing/
and video

Oops I didn't look at the video before commenting
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane No. 619.3730

Hello everyone. I hope you all are doing well.

This blog entry is about a Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane. You can watch a demonstration here if you'd like.

Tool Bicycle part Motor vehicle Font Auto part

Hand tool Tool Font Automotive tire Metalworking hand tool


From what I could find, this plane was made for Craftsman by Sargent and Company sometime before 1964. The 619, at the front of the model number, indicates that it was made by Sargent and Company. Please let me know if I am incorrect on that.

Handwriting Finger Gesture Wood Thumb


This hand plane was purchased quite a while back at a local antiques mall for $40. Given the condition of the plane, I was glad to pay this price. Especially since the plane came with all the major components. The only thing it lacked was the rod for the fence. I was able to make one that works well.

Finger Gesture Nail Thumb Bumper


Not knowing what the original looked like, I simply cut a slot in the end for a common screw driver.

Hand Finger Gesture Tool Thumb


The spur (knicker) for this plane differs from other rabbeting planes in that it is round.

Automotive tire Tire Wood Bumper Finger


Here is how the instructions tell you to set the spur.

Font Office supplies Parallel Paper Paper product


I found this to be problematic when using the plane in a cross-grain application (the spur is not needed when making a rabbet with the grain). The spur seemed to extend below the surface of the plane sole too much, nearly 1/8".

This picture shows what I mean.
Tool Bumper Hand tool Automotive wheel system Gas


This doesn't allow the iron to engage with the material the way it should. So, I used the spur to score the fibers of the material, then I disengaged the spur.

Wood Gesture Flooring Floor Wood stain


With the surface fibers sufficiently scored, I was able to make a cross-grain rabbet with no problem.

Saw Wood Tool Gas Power tool


The above picture shows a rabbet with the grain and across the grain. The rabbet made with the grain was fairly typical so nothing needs to be said about that.

Where to start a rabbet cut seems to be up for debate.

Do you start at the end of the board and work your way to the front?

Wood Vise Saw Gas Pneumatic tool


Or, do you start at the front and work toward the end?

Table Wood Textile Tool Rectangle


I personally don't think it matters. But, I would like to know your thoughts. Which method do you use and why?

What about the plane iron? Should it be absolutely flush with the side of the plane body or should it be slightly proud of the surface?

Calipers Wood Tool Gesture Bumper


This too seems to be a personal preference.

With all of that being said, and I'm sure that I could prattle on much longer about it, I'm glad that I bought this Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane. I wasn't able to find very much about this model online so if you have one I'd like to hear about it.

Do you even own a rabbeting plane? This exact model or another? What has been your experience?

Thank you so much for your time. God bless.
Dave, Oldtool, and Sylvain - Thank you for sharing your experience. Your input is very helpful for me as I am learning how to use this tool. I can see the wisdom in starting the cut at the end of the material and working your way back. Thanks again for your help.
 

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Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane No. 619.3730

Hello everyone. I hope you all are doing well.

This blog entry is about a Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane. You can watch a demonstration here if you'd like.

Tool Bicycle part Motor vehicle Font Auto part

Hand tool Tool Font Automotive tire Metalworking hand tool


From what I could find, this plane was made for Craftsman by Sargent and Company sometime before 1964. The 619, at the front of the model number, indicates that it was made by Sargent and Company. Please let me know if I am incorrect on that.

Handwriting Finger Gesture Wood Thumb


This hand plane was purchased quite a while back at a local antiques mall for $40. Given the condition of the plane, I was glad to pay this price. Especially since the plane came with all the major components. The only thing it lacked was the rod for the fence. I was able to make one that works well.

Finger Gesture Nail Thumb Bumper


Not knowing what the original looked like, I simply cut a slot in the end for a common screw driver.

Hand Finger Gesture Tool Thumb


The spur (knicker) for this plane differs from other rabbeting planes in that it is round.

Automotive tire Tire Wood Bumper Finger


Here is how the instructions tell you to set the spur.

Font Office supplies Parallel Paper Paper product


I found this to be problematic when using the plane in a cross-grain application (the spur is not needed when making a rabbet with the grain). The spur seemed to extend below the surface of the plane sole too much, nearly 1/8".

This picture shows what I mean.
Tool Bumper Hand tool Automotive wheel system Gas


This doesn't allow the iron to engage with the material the way it should. So, I used the spur to score the fibers of the material, then I disengaged the spur.

Wood Gesture Flooring Floor Wood stain


With the surface fibers sufficiently scored, I was able to make a cross-grain rabbet with no problem.

Saw Wood Tool Gas Power tool


The above picture shows a rabbet with the grain and across the grain. The rabbet made with the grain was fairly typical so nothing needs to be said about that.

Where to start a rabbet cut seems to be up for debate.

Do you start at the end of the board and work your way to the front?

Wood Vise Saw Gas Pneumatic tool


Or, do you start at the front and work toward the end?

Table Wood Textile Tool Rectangle


I personally don't think it matters. But, I would like to know your thoughts. Which method do you use and why?

What about the plane iron? Should it be absolutely flush with the side of the plane body or should it be slightly proud of the surface?

Calipers Wood Tool Gesture Bumper


This too seems to be a personal preference.

With all of that being said, and I'm sure that I could prattle on much longer about it, I'm glad that I bought this Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane. I wasn't able to find very much about this model online so if you have one I'd like to hear about it.

Do you even own a rabbeting plane? This exact model or another? What has been your experience?

Thank you so much for your time. God bless.
I have one just like that I bought on eBay a few years ago - just like yours in the box. The blade had the factory grind on it!

If you look at the fence casting, you will see the Sargent part number.

I picked up an extra blade with the intention of grinding it with a big camber so I can use the plane as a scrub plane as Paul Sellers does, but I've not yet ground the extra blade.

-Paul
 

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Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane No. 619.3730

Hello everyone. I hope you all are doing well.

This blog entry is about a Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane. You can watch a demonstration here if you'd like.

Tool Bicycle part Motor vehicle Font Auto part

Hand tool Tool Font Automotive tire Metalworking hand tool


From what I could find, this plane was made for Craftsman by Sargent and Company sometime before 1964. The 619, at the front of the model number, indicates that it was made by Sargent and Company. Please let me know if I am incorrect on that.

Handwriting Finger Gesture Wood Thumb


This hand plane was purchased quite a while back at a local antiques mall for $40. Given the condition of the plane, I was glad to pay this price. Especially since the plane came with all the major components. The only thing it lacked was the rod for the fence. I was able to make one that works well.

Finger Gesture Nail Thumb Bumper


Not knowing what the original looked like, I simply cut a slot in the end for a common screw driver.

Hand Finger Gesture Tool Thumb


The spur (knicker) for this plane differs from other rabbeting planes in that it is round.

Automotive tire Tire Wood Bumper Finger


Here is how the instructions tell you to set the spur.

Font Office supplies Parallel Paper Paper product


I found this to be problematic when using the plane in a cross-grain application (the spur is not needed when making a rabbet with the grain). The spur seemed to extend below the surface of the plane sole too much, nearly 1/8".

This picture shows what I mean.
Tool Bumper Hand tool Automotive wheel system Gas


This doesn't allow the iron to engage with the material the way it should. So, I used the spur to score the fibers of the material, then I disengaged the spur.

Wood Gesture Flooring Floor Wood stain


With the surface fibers sufficiently scored, I was able to make a cross-grain rabbet with no problem.

Saw Wood Tool Gas Power tool


The above picture shows a rabbet with the grain and across the grain. The rabbet made with the grain was fairly typical so nothing needs to be said about that.

Where to start a rabbet cut seems to be up for debate.

Do you start at the end of the board and work your way to the front?

Wood Vise Saw Gas Pneumatic tool


Or, do you start at the front and work toward the end?

Table Wood Textile Tool Rectangle


I personally don't think it matters. But, I would like to know your thoughts. Which method do you use and why?

What about the plane iron? Should it be absolutely flush with the side of the plane body or should it be slightly proud of the surface?

Calipers Wood Tool Gesture Bumper


This too seems to be a personal preference.

With all of that being said, and I'm sure that I could prattle on much longer about it, I'm glad that I bought this Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane. I wasn't able to find very much about this model online so if you have one I'd like to hear about it.

Do you even own a rabbeting plane? This exact model or another? What has been your experience?

Thank you so much for your time. God bless.
You might try sharpening the spur by just working it face down on a fine diamond plate. The sharper it is, the better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane No. 619.3730

Hello everyone. I hope you all are doing well.

This blog entry is about a Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane. You can watch a demonstration here if you'd like.

Tool Bicycle part Motor vehicle Font Auto part

Hand tool Tool Font Automotive tire Metalworking hand tool


From what I could find, this plane was made for Craftsman by Sargent and Company sometime before 1964. The 619, at the front of the model number, indicates that it was made by Sargent and Company. Please let me know if I am incorrect on that.

Handwriting Finger Gesture Wood Thumb


This hand plane was purchased quite a while back at a local antiques mall for $40. Given the condition of the plane, I was glad to pay this price. Especially since the plane came with all the major components. The only thing it lacked was the rod for the fence. I was able to make one that works well.

Finger Gesture Nail Thumb Bumper


Not knowing what the original looked like, I simply cut a slot in the end for a common screw driver.

Hand Finger Gesture Tool Thumb


The spur (knicker) for this plane differs from other rabbeting planes in that it is round.

Automotive tire Tire Wood Bumper Finger


Here is how the instructions tell you to set the spur.

Font Office supplies Parallel Paper Paper product


I found this to be problematic when using the plane in a cross-grain application (the spur is not needed when making a rabbet with the grain). The spur seemed to extend below the surface of the plane sole too much, nearly 1/8".

This picture shows what I mean.
Tool Bumper Hand tool Automotive wheel system Gas


This doesn't allow the iron to engage with the material the way it should. So, I used the spur to score the fibers of the material, then I disengaged the spur.

Wood Gesture Flooring Floor Wood stain


With the surface fibers sufficiently scored, I was able to make a cross-grain rabbet with no problem.

Saw Wood Tool Gas Power tool


The above picture shows a rabbet with the grain and across the grain. The rabbet made with the grain was fairly typical so nothing needs to be said about that.

Where to start a rabbet cut seems to be up for debate.

Do you start at the end of the board and work your way to the front?

Wood Vise Saw Gas Pneumatic tool


Or, do you start at the front and work toward the end?

Table Wood Textile Tool Rectangle


I personally don't think it matters. But, I would like to know your thoughts. Which method do you use and why?

What about the plane iron? Should it be absolutely flush with the side of the plane body or should it be slightly proud of the surface?

Calipers Wood Tool Gesture Bumper


This too seems to be a personal preference.

With all of that being said, and I'm sure that I could prattle on much longer about it, I'm glad that I bought this Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane. I wasn't able to find very much about this model online so if you have one I'd like to hear about it.

Do you even own a rabbeting plane? This exact model or another? What has been your experience?

Thank you so much for your time. God bless.
Ocelot - Thank you very much. I looked at both the fence and the depth stop. They both have 79 cast into them. I never even noticed that. I will give sharpening the spur a try. Thanks again.
 

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Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane No. 619.3730

Hello everyone. I hope you all are doing well.

This blog entry is about a Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane. You can watch a demonstration here if you'd like.

Tool Bicycle part Motor vehicle Font Auto part

Hand tool Tool Font Automotive tire Metalworking hand tool


From what I could find, this plane was made for Craftsman by Sargent and Company sometime before 1964. The 619, at the front of the model number, indicates that it was made by Sargent and Company. Please let me know if I am incorrect on that.

Handwriting Finger Gesture Wood Thumb


This hand plane was purchased quite a while back at a local antiques mall for $40. Given the condition of the plane, I was glad to pay this price. Especially since the plane came with all the major components. The only thing it lacked was the rod for the fence. I was able to make one that works well.

Finger Gesture Nail Thumb Bumper


Not knowing what the original looked like, I simply cut a slot in the end for a common screw driver.

Hand Finger Gesture Tool Thumb


The spur (knicker) for this plane differs from other rabbeting planes in that it is round.

Automotive tire Tire Wood Bumper Finger


Here is how the instructions tell you to set the spur.

Font Office supplies Parallel Paper Paper product


I found this to be problematic when using the plane in a cross-grain application (the spur is not needed when making a rabbet with the grain). The spur seemed to extend below the surface of the plane sole too much, nearly 1/8".

This picture shows what I mean.
Tool Bumper Hand tool Automotive wheel system Gas


This doesn't allow the iron to engage with the material the way it should. So, I used the spur to score the fibers of the material, then I disengaged the spur.

Wood Gesture Flooring Floor Wood stain


With the surface fibers sufficiently scored, I was able to make a cross-grain rabbet with no problem.

Saw Wood Tool Gas Power tool


The above picture shows a rabbet with the grain and across the grain. The rabbet made with the grain was fairly typical so nothing needs to be said about that.

Where to start a rabbet cut seems to be up for debate.

Do you start at the end of the board and work your way to the front?

Wood Vise Saw Gas Pneumatic tool


Or, do you start at the front and work toward the end?

Table Wood Textile Tool Rectangle


I personally don't think it matters. But, I would like to know your thoughts. Which method do you use and why?

What about the plane iron? Should it be absolutely flush with the side of the plane body or should it be slightly proud of the surface?

Calipers Wood Tool Gesture Bumper


This too seems to be a personal preference.

With all of that being said, and I'm sure that I could prattle on much longer about it, I'm glad that I bought this Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane. I wasn't able to find very much about this model online so if you have one I'd like to hear about it.

Do you even own a rabbeting plane? This exact model or another? What has been your experience?

Thank you so much for your time. God bless.
The spur is for going across the grain…drag the plane backwards 2-3 times, THEN push forward. No spur is needed when going with the grain….in fact, the spur will cause "steps" to appear along the rabbet…

Iron should have a slight relief angle, so only the leading edge of the iron sticks out, barely

I have a pair of the older Sargent/Craftsman #79s and a Stanley/Wards #78…..intend to use them this week…
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane No. 619.3730

Hello everyone. I hope you all are doing well.

This blog entry is about a Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane. You can watch a demonstration here if you'd like.

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From what I could find, this plane was made for Craftsman by Sargent and Company sometime before 1964. The 619, at the front of the model number, indicates that it was made by Sargent and Company. Please let me know if I am incorrect on that.

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This hand plane was purchased quite a while back at a local antiques mall for $40. Given the condition of the plane, I was glad to pay this price. Especially since the plane came with all the major components. The only thing it lacked was the rod for the fence. I was able to make one that works well.

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Not knowing what the original looked like, I simply cut a slot in the end for a common screw driver.

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The spur (knicker) for this plane differs from other rabbeting planes in that it is round.

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Here is how the instructions tell you to set the spur.

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I found this to be problematic when using the plane in a cross-grain application (the spur is not needed when making a rabbet with the grain). The spur seemed to extend below the surface of the plane sole too much, nearly 1/8".

This picture shows what I mean.
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This doesn't allow the iron to engage with the material the way it should. So, I used the spur to score the fibers of the material, then I disengaged the spur.

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With the surface fibers sufficiently scored, I was able to make a cross-grain rabbet with no problem.

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The above picture shows a rabbet with the grain and across the grain. The rabbet made with the grain was fairly typical so nothing needs to be said about that.

Where to start a rabbet cut seems to be up for debate.

Do you start at the end of the board and work your way to the front?

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Or, do you start at the front and work toward the end?

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I personally don't think it matters. But, I would like to know your thoughts. Which method do you use and why?

What about the plane iron? Should it be absolutely flush with the side of the plane body or should it be slightly proud of the surface?

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This too seems to be a personal preference.

With all of that being said, and I'm sure that I could prattle on much longer about it, I'm glad that I bought this Craftsman Rabbet and Fillister Plane. I wasn't able to find very much about this model online so if you have one I'd like to hear about it.

Do you even own a rabbeting plane? This exact model or another? What has been your experience?

Thank you so much for your time. God bless.
bandit571 - Thanks for the feedback and insight. I'll keep it in mind.
 

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