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Hello all … my name is Quintin. This will be my first post here.

I aquired a Craftsman 113 table saw. I've done enough research to know it was a pretty good score, especially since I got it for free! It's functional but, as with most of these units, needs a bit of TLC. I've found more than enough information to know what I need to do.

I've begun to tear it down in order to clean it up and rebuild it. I'm kinda stuck trying to get the arm that controls the up / down of the blade off the primary support, for lack of a better term, inside the unit. I've run across a couple videos that outline this process but neither show actually removing it. One indicates rocking it back and forth repeatedly until it has been worked off but, mine does not "rock" nor does it look like it should. He didn't show it. He just explained it after it was off.

I can't get the think to budge.

Can anyone give a little advice on how this is removed?

Here is a pic of the piece …
 

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Does the handwheel shaft move at all? I'd spray the whole thing down good with penetrating oil (PB Blaster) on the gears, gear shaft, swing arm pivot shaft, handwheel bushings, etc….just about anything that's supposed to move on that assembly. You might even try a light tap on the side of the arbor swing arm (not on the gears) and/or the sleeve of the gear shaft to free it up.
 

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Just curious, did you get your problem solved? I have the same model TS and spent the weekend disassembling it. I had no problem getting the arbor off the shaft, however I did have to "coax" it off the shaft with a thin piece of maple and a mallet. I just slowly tapped it as close to the shaft on the inside of the arbor while working it back and forth. No problem, and I got all the pieces cleaned up nicely.

Also were you going to replace the arbor bearings while you've got it apart? I'm researching that part now, think I'm going to have the top milled flat and get the bearings press out and new one's installed at a local machine shop. My top is cupped pretty nicely near the blade opening. Probably not the cheapest alternative but I've had this saw for 20+ years and it's served me well. Good luck with your rebuild.
 

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Looks like a hit and run user… only one post and no follow up. Hopefully they will come back to report success.

As for the bearings, don't take them to a shop! They are not too difficult to get out and put back in using common stuff you should have around the garage (vice, C-clamps, soft-blow hammer, wood, etc..). As for the table top.. it might be cheaper just to find a parts machine and use the top from it.

Cheers,
Brad
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have not got it loose yet. I have not worked it much either. I've been occupied with scouting activities the last 3 out of 4 weekends.

I don't know on the bearings. They don't spin as well as I would like but I think they are good enough that I may just leave that alone.

My top is in pretty good shape. It just needs some TLC and all will be good.

Thanks for checking in and asking.

I'll be more active one my tools are running and shop basics setup. Right now I don't have anything to share or ask nor do I have the experience to give solid, knowledgeable advice.
 

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I just took mine off over the weekend. I would guess that yours may just be stuck from some rust in between that shaft and the arm. I would suggest trying to get some kind of penetrant in there to get it loose again.

I would suggest replacing the bearings while you are in there. It really isn't too difficult and it will be much more difficult later on if you decide you do want to replace them. The original part number was part 3509 but I believe it has been replaced with a better bearing that had seals instead of shields. I just ordered some from Ebay.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have sprayed it down with Liquid Wrench several times. If there is something better, I'm all ears. I see now that knotscott recommended PB Blaster. I'll have to look around for that.

I should be back on it this weekend.

Thanks for the advice.
 

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No need to get OEM bearings.. bearings are an off the shelf item and can be sourced from any good bearing supplier such as Accurate Bearing for much cheaper. From the Vintagemachinery wiki , those are pretty standard 6202ZZ-5/8 bearings (shielded with a 5/8" bore), but it would be an upgrade to go with the 6202RS-5/8 bearings (sealed, also sometimes known as 6202LL-5/8).

Note of caution though.. don't order the bearings before you yank the old ones and verify what you have! They aren't always what the parts list/manual says they are. Remove them and measure first to be sure!

Cheers,
Brad
 

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I would also caution you to measure exactly. The bearings in my saw are not 5/8" ID. They are 0.621" ID and the arbor is 0.622". A 5/8" bearing would not work in my case which is why I ended up having to order replacement parts.

I also can't remember the serial number for my saw but I do know it is from ~1956 so they have likely changed bearings a couple of times since then.
 

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0.622? That is only about 0.003" off of 5/8 (those bearings are listed as 0.6248" bore), and the standard 6202 has a 15mm bore (0.5906"), which is much smaller. There is also the 6202-16 (16mm bore) which is 0.6299", but even that is still some 0.007" off, more than the 5/8" bore version. What did you wind up getting? It really sounds like your saw had a bad bearing that spun and ate the shaft a little at some point in it's lifetime; which is actually a fairly common problem on older machines due to lack of maintenance.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: you are correct though about bearings being changed over the lifetime of a machine.. I've restored several machines that had different bearings than what was listed in the parts diagram. Some were probably in-house manufacturer changes over the lifetime of the machine, and some could have been modifications made by previous owners. One very common change is to swap out extended race bearings with standard bearings and using a spacer to make up the difference. Another, like mentioned above, is when a shaft gets scored due to a seized bearing, altering it's diameter. There is no telling what may be in there until you open it up and look!
 

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My #113 developed the same problem over last winter. PB blaster and patience worked for me (IIRC took about 3 days of spraying 1-2 a day). I first removed the acme threaded rod and circlip, then used a screwdriver to get it to begin moving, prying carefully. Once it was moving I was able to rotate it back and forth to get it moving very freely again. I was never able to completely remove it, but it rotates very smoothly so I didn't pursue it further. I did consider buying or renting a 3 arm puller from an auto parts store, making a puller work in the confined space on the backside of the arbor would have probably required some creative fabricating. My arbor bearings were fine so I didn't see the need to go further.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
ACME threaded rod and circlip?

I had the 3 arm puller thought, too. I have not worked it hard enough yet, though. Every indication is that that I should be able to get it off without figuring how to get creative with that, though.
 

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Get a pair of snap ring pliers with different sized tips. Take the clip off the arm (it rests in a groove machined into the shaft) and you should be able to back it right out. If there are no holes in the clip just take a small screwdriver and place the tip between the ring and shaft and tap downward (away from the split in the ring).
 

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By threaded rod I'm referring to the one in the photo that engages the arc to make it move. I originally left it in as a way of getting the pivot to move. It was putting so much stress on the c shaped clip it actually bent it requiring replacement. I also nearly snapped the plastic crank wheel, not a big deal grizzlys got an excellent assortment of replacements, but if ain't broke don't break it ;).

I actually deal with this type of seizure frequently as I am a bike mechanic by trade. Seatposts very commonly get seized in frames. They are almost always 2 different materials such as aluminum and cro-moly so they will seize in a few seasons if left dry (normal assembly procedures dictate grease) anti seize is better but messier to the end user. The method for bikes is to let PB blaster penetrate over a few days. Once you get the post to move even a little you can rotate it back and forth as rapidly as possible. This does 2 things, it grinds up the corrosion into a less "grabby" slurry, and it heats up the 2 parts (substantially, watch your fingers!) when you stop the 2 pieces cool at different rates as they are always different thickness and/or materials, temporarily increasing the clearances allowing you to pull it out/off.
 

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It turns out, I was wrong about bearing size. I measured the shaft with a micrometer yesterday and came up with .625". I think that the calipers I was using might be a little screwy since I could continually get .622" with those.

Either way, I think it would be worth replacing the bearings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
When you remove the circular clip in the groove on the end of the threaded rod closest to the threaded arc you can simply screw out of engagement with the arc. It is a left hand thread I believe.

- jsuede
That is very possibly the tip I've been looking for. Thanks!
 

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You need to take the retainer clips off the shafts before you can remove anything. They both look like c-rings to me but it's a little hard to tell without seeing them my self up close.you can usually get them off with a very small screwdriver wedged into the split. Try to rotate the ring , so as to give you a better view and proper access to the ends of the ring. You have to remove the threaded part in order to disengage it from the threads or you will damage the threads. Once you remove the retainer ring(s) <then rock the mechanism back and forth as you pull it toward you . It will slide off, the threaded shaft will then come free. Also as indicated before soak it with WD 40 , multiple times if needed .
https://flic.kr/p/16603128359
 
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