LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
5,965 Posts
+1 to Loren.

$125 seems like a good price, but what you are really getting is a universal motor job-site table saw with legs and a nicer fence. With a similar amount of money and some patience, you should be able to pick up a belt drive contractor saw that would be much better in the long run.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,965 Posts
The C10FL has a good reputation and a strong following. IIRC, it is a belt drive with the motor mounted inside the cabinet (instead of hanging off the back). The fence is pretty good and with a little tuning can make a very good saw. It is a FAR better saw than the B&D.

$275 seems fair, if it is in good shape. Not a bargain, but they aren't asking for the moon, either. I'd offer a bit less, like $225-250 and see what happens. Even if you have to pay full asking, you should come out OK.

If you have the patience, wait until knotscott checks in and see what he has to say. He is very knowledgeable on table saws and will be helpful.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,965 Posts
The Craftsman 113 series are pretty good contractor style saws and can be made to work well. It is what I am currently using and it meets all of my needs very nicely. Cast iron top, that one has steel wings, but it is possible to pick up cast iron grate wings for very little if you prefer. All that said, they have one major downfall-the fence sucks. It will cost $150-200 for a new fence to fit. You can get by with the stock fence for a while, but be prepared for some frustrations. Make sure it is a belt drive, Craftsman also had a "Flex Drive" style 113 that drove the blade with a flexible shaft-if it is that type, I would pass.

For the same money, personally, I would prefer the Hitachi and not need to worry about the upgrade. If that deal falls through the Craftsman is not a bad back-up plan.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,965 Posts
Similar model to the one above, do you have any other pictures of the front & rear?

Cleaning the rusty top is pretty simple and straight forward, just takes some time and elbow grease. As long as everything checks out, $80 is a good price. The price difference is basically the time and effort it will take to clean up the second, while the first looks pretty much ready to go. Your call on how much your time is worth.

Don't get caught up in analysis, find a saw you will be happy with at a price you are willing to pay and start making sawdust. It is too easy to continually second guess and end up not making a decision at all and so not do any woodworking.

BTW, it is more than 10 years old, not really a bad thing, just sayin'. Maybe the seller just doesn't know much about it.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,965 Posts
TOM, check here. It is part # A-59 Beltguard-just a plastic piece that goes over the belt pulley. You could easily make one out of some scrap wood and 1/4in ply, as well.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,965 Posts
Congrats on your new tool. Be safe, have fun and make some sawdust!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,965 Posts
I used gray Scotch pads under a 1/4 sheet finish sander and got very good results quickly. Put a coarse sandpaper on the sander to grip the Scotch pad, add a few drops of 3-in-1 oil on the saw top and start sanding.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,965 Posts
+1 for toolie's advice.

As long as any red rust is gone, you will be fine. Sometimes trying to remove all black marks ends up causing more problems.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top