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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Part 1

I keep getting a lot of private messages from Lumberjocks asking questions about my boards and selling at shows so I decided to start talking about my experiences this year and maybe it will help those who want start the show circuit or are trying to decide if it's for them. I consider myself a newbie at it since I just started this year and I know there are a lot of jocks that have been doing shows for years, so I don't intend to write a "how to" guide, but document my journey into this carnivorous monster.

I started making cutting boards the first of the year when my cabinet and closet business decided to follow the economy into its downward spiral. Actually, I just needed something to occupy my time between long dry spells. I found a lot of people who liked the boards and were willing to buy the boards. After selling 20 or so, I figured that if I can do this with a small group of friends and their friends then what would happen if I had an audience of 2,000 10,000 or 20,000? Could I do it full time and do well enough to close my closet company?

So I hit up a woodworker friend that has successfully done shows for 15 years for advice. His first comment was "You don't realize what you are getting yourself into stud!" It took a while to realize what he meant by that. Doing shows is not that difficult. It's getting started that is hard. Now I could go to small shows and flea markets, set up some 2×4s on cinder blocks and do my thing, but I wanted to do big juried shows. This takes a little more planning. In fact it got down right frustrating at times when I thought I had everything I needed, and then discovered more things I forgot. I've been a small business owner for 7 years and thought this would be a piece of cake.

Canopy, tables, table cloths, merchant account, display stands, product containers for transport, bags, receipts, business license, sales tax number, business checking account. The list goes on and on. It actually took me a couple of months to get everything together before I could actually apply to my first show.

Now that I have some shows under my belt, I have to say that the canopy is the most important part of the traveling circus. Like many, I went the cheap route and bought an $250 Ez Up. This is by far the most popular canopy out there. It's also the best kite ever designed. At my first show, a large gust of wind came blowing through the show and 5 or 6 went flying across the street scattering crafts all over the place, and they had weights on each leg. I was lucky that I was sitting between two bigger tents that blocked some of the wind and I was spared. Two weeks later I spent $1000 and bought a Trimline.

Now the Ez Up is exactly what it says. I can get it up in five minutes and that includes taking a beer break in the middle. The Trimline takes 30 - 45 minutes to get up (without a beer break). However, when I leave it overnight at a show, I know that short of a hurricane, it will still be there the next morning. It only takes one time sitting in it during a down pour that I appreciate the fact that I bought it.

Old Ez Up
Plant Tent Table Tree Shade


New Trimline
Tent Plant Wheel Shade Tree


More to come….
 

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Part 1

I keep getting a lot of private messages from Lumberjocks asking questions about my boards and selling at shows so I decided to start talking about my experiences this year and maybe it will help those who want start the show circuit or are trying to decide if it's for them. I consider myself a newbie at it since I just started this year and I know there are a lot of jocks that have been doing shows for years, so I don't intend to write a "how to" guide, but document my journey into this carnivorous monster.

I started making cutting boards the first of the year when my cabinet and closet business decided to follow the economy into its downward spiral. Actually, I just needed something to occupy my time between long dry spells. I found a lot of people who liked the boards and were willing to buy the boards. After selling 20 or so, I figured that if I can do this with a small group of friends and their friends then what would happen if I had an audience of 2,000 10,000 or 20,000? Could I do it full time and do well enough to close my closet company?

So I hit up a woodworker friend that has successfully done shows for 15 years for advice. His first comment was "You don't realize what you are getting yourself into stud!" It took a while to realize what he meant by that. Doing shows is not that difficult. It's getting started that is hard. Now I could go to small shows and flea markets, set up some 2×4s on cinder blocks and do my thing, but I wanted to do big juried shows. This takes a little more planning. In fact it got down right frustrating at times when I thought I had everything I needed, and then discovered more things I forgot. I've been a small business owner for 7 years and thought this would be a piece of cake.

Canopy, tables, table cloths, merchant account, display stands, product containers for transport, bags, receipts, business license, sales tax number, business checking account. The list goes on and on. It actually took me a couple of months to get everything together before I could actually apply to my first show.

Now that I have some shows under my belt, I have to say that the canopy is the most important part of the traveling circus. Like many, I went the cheap route and bought an $250 Ez Up. This is by far the most popular canopy out there. It's also the best kite ever designed. At my first show, a large gust of wind came blowing through the show and 5 or 6 went flying across the street scattering crafts all over the place, and they had weights on each leg. I was lucky that I was sitting between two bigger tents that blocked some of the wind and I was spared. Two weeks later I spent $1000 and bought a Trimline.

Now the Ez Up is exactly what it says. I can get it up in five minutes and that includes taking a beer break in the middle. The Trimline takes 30 - 45 minutes to get up (without a beer break). However, when I leave it overnight at a show, I know that short of a hurricane, it will still be there the next morning. It only takes one time sitting in it during a down pour that I appreciate the fact that I bought it.

Old Ez Up
Plant Tent Table Tree Shade


New Trimline
Tent Plant Wheel Shade Tree


More to come….
I need more info. I'm thinking about doing something like this. Thanks for the post!
 

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Part 1

I keep getting a lot of private messages from Lumberjocks asking questions about my boards and selling at shows so I decided to start talking about my experiences this year and maybe it will help those who want start the show circuit or are trying to decide if it's for them. I consider myself a newbie at it since I just started this year and I know there are a lot of jocks that have been doing shows for years, so I don't intend to write a "how to" guide, but document my journey into this carnivorous monster.

I started making cutting boards the first of the year when my cabinet and closet business decided to follow the economy into its downward spiral. Actually, I just needed something to occupy my time between long dry spells. I found a lot of people who liked the boards and were willing to buy the boards. After selling 20 or so, I figured that if I can do this with a small group of friends and their friends then what would happen if I had an audience of 2,000 10,000 or 20,000? Could I do it full time and do well enough to close my closet company?

So I hit up a woodworker friend that has successfully done shows for 15 years for advice. His first comment was "You don't realize what you are getting yourself into stud!" It took a while to realize what he meant by that. Doing shows is not that difficult. It's getting started that is hard. Now I could go to small shows and flea markets, set up some 2×4s on cinder blocks and do my thing, but I wanted to do big juried shows. This takes a little more planning. In fact it got down right frustrating at times when I thought I had everything I needed, and then discovered more things I forgot. I've been a small business owner for 7 years and thought this would be a piece of cake.

Canopy, tables, table cloths, merchant account, display stands, product containers for transport, bags, receipts, business license, sales tax number, business checking account. The list goes on and on. It actually took me a couple of months to get everything together before I could actually apply to my first show.

Now that I have some shows under my belt, I have to say that the canopy is the most important part of the traveling circus. Like many, I went the cheap route and bought an $250 Ez Up. This is by far the most popular canopy out there. It's also the best kite ever designed. At my first show, a large gust of wind came blowing through the show and 5 or 6 went flying across the street scattering crafts all over the place, and they had weights on each leg. I was lucky that I was sitting between two bigger tents that blocked some of the wind and I was spared. Two weeks later I spent $1000 and bought a Trimline.

Now the Ez Up is exactly what it says. I can get it up in five minutes and that includes taking a beer break in the middle. The Trimline takes 30 - 45 minutes to get up (without a beer break). However, when I leave it overnight at a show, I know that short of a hurricane, it will still be there the next morning. It only takes one time sitting in it during a down pour that I appreciate the fact that I bought it.

Old Ez Up
Plant Tent Table Tree Shade


New Trimline
Tent Plant Wheel Shade Tree


More to come….
Thanks for sharing your experiences. The information is very helpful.
 

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Part 1

I keep getting a lot of private messages from Lumberjocks asking questions about my boards and selling at shows so I decided to start talking about my experiences this year and maybe it will help those who want start the show circuit or are trying to decide if it's for them. I consider myself a newbie at it since I just started this year and I know there are a lot of jocks that have been doing shows for years, so I don't intend to write a "how to" guide, but document my journey into this carnivorous monster.

I started making cutting boards the first of the year when my cabinet and closet business decided to follow the economy into its downward spiral. Actually, I just needed something to occupy my time between long dry spells. I found a lot of people who liked the boards and were willing to buy the boards. After selling 20 or so, I figured that if I can do this with a small group of friends and their friends then what would happen if I had an audience of 2,000 10,000 or 20,000? Could I do it full time and do well enough to close my closet company?

So I hit up a woodworker friend that has successfully done shows for 15 years for advice. His first comment was "You don't realize what you are getting yourself into stud!" It took a while to realize what he meant by that. Doing shows is not that difficult. It's getting started that is hard. Now I could go to small shows and flea markets, set up some 2×4s on cinder blocks and do my thing, but I wanted to do big juried shows. This takes a little more planning. In fact it got down right frustrating at times when I thought I had everything I needed, and then discovered more things I forgot. I've been a small business owner for 7 years and thought this would be a piece of cake.

Canopy, tables, table cloths, merchant account, display stands, product containers for transport, bags, receipts, business license, sales tax number, business checking account. The list goes on and on. It actually took me a couple of months to get everything together before I could actually apply to my first show.

Now that I have some shows under my belt, I have to say that the canopy is the most important part of the traveling circus. Like many, I went the cheap route and bought an $250 Ez Up. This is by far the most popular canopy out there. It's also the best kite ever designed. At my first show, a large gust of wind came blowing through the show and 5 or 6 went flying across the street scattering crafts all over the place, and they had weights on each leg. I was lucky that I was sitting between two bigger tents that blocked some of the wind and I was spared. Two weeks later I spent $1000 and bought a Trimline.

Now the Ez Up is exactly what it says. I can get it up in five minutes and that includes taking a beer break in the middle. The Trimline takes 30 - 45 minutes to get up (without a beer break). However, when I leave it overnight at a show, I know that short of a hurricane, it will still be there the next morning. It only takes one time sitting in it during a down pour that I appreciate the fact that I bought it.

Old Ez Up
Plant Tent Table Tree Shade


New Trimline
Tent Plant Wheel Shade Tree


More to come….
CLOSETGUY:
Thats a pritty nice display-looks like some pritty heafty counter weights.
 

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Part 1

I keep getting a lot of private messages from Lumberjocks asking questions about my boards and selling at shows so I decided to start talking about my experiences this year and maybe it will help those who want start the show circuit or are trying to decide if it's for them. I consider myself a newbie at it since I just started this year and I know there are a lot of jocks that have been doing shows for years, so I don't intend to write a "how to" guide, but document my journey into this carnivorous monster.

I started making cutting boards the first of the year when my cabinet and closet business decided to follow the economy into its downward spiral. Actually, I just needed something to occupy my time between long dry spells. I found a lot of people who liked the boards and were willing to buy the boards. After selling 20 or so, I figured that if I can do this with a small group of friends and their friends then what would happen if I had an audience of 2,000 10,000 or 20,000? Could I do it full time and do well enough to close my closet company?

So I hit up a woodworker friend that has successfully done shows for 15 years for advice. His first comment was "You don't realize what you are getting yourself into stud!" It took a while to realize what he meant by that. Doing shows is not that difficult. It's getting started that is hard. Now I could go to small shows and flea markets, set up some 2×4s on cinder blocks and do my thing, but I wanted to do big juried shows. This takes a little more planning. In fact it got down right frustrating at times when I thought I had everything I needed, and then discovered more things I forgot. I've been a small business owner for 7 years and thought this would be a piece of cake.

Canopy, tables, table cloths, merchant account, display stands, product containers for transport, bags, receipts, business license, sales tax number, business checking account. The list goes on and on. It actually took me a couple of months to get everything together before I could actually apply to my first show.

Now that I have some shows under my belt, I have to say that the canopy is the most important part of the traveling circus. Like many, I went the cheap route and bought an $250 Ez Up. This is by far the most popular canopy out there. It's also the best kite ever designed. At my first show, a large gust of wind came blowing through the show and 5 or 6 went flying across the street scattering crafts all over the place, and they had weights on each leg. I was lucky that I was sitting between two bigger tents that blocked some of the wind and I was spared. Two weeks later I spent $1000 and bought a Trimline.

Now the Ez Up is exactly what it says. I can get it up in five minutes and that includes taking a beer break in the middle. The Trimline takes 30 - 45 minutes to get up (without a beer break). However, when I leave it overnight at a show, I know that short of a hurricane, it will still be there the next morning. It only takes one time sitting in it during a down pour that I appreciate the fact that I bought it.

Old Ez Up
Plant Tent Table Tree Shade


New Trimline
Tent Plant Wheel Shade Tree


More to come….
thank you for the post and I look forward to hearing more.
 

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Part 1

I keep getting a lot of private messages from Lumberjocks asking questions about my boards and selling at shows so I decided to start talking about my experiences this year and maybe it will help those who want start the show circuit or are trying to decide if it's for them. I consider myself a newbie at it since I just started this year and I know there are a lot of jocks that have been doing shows for years, so I don't intend to write a "how to" guide, but document my journey into this carnivorous monster.

I started making cutting boards the first of the year when my cabinet and closet business decided to follow the economy into its downward spiral. Actually, I just needed something to occupy my time between long dry spells. I found a lot of people who liked the boards and were willing to buy the boards. After selling 20 or so, I figured that if I can do this with a small group of friends and their friends then what would happen if I had an audience of 2,000 10,000 or 20,000? Could I do it full time and do well enough to close my closet company?

So I hit up a woodworker friend that has successfully done shows for 15 years for advice. His first comment was "You don't realize what you are getting yourself into stud!" It took a while to realize what he meant by that. Doing shows is not that difficult. It's getting started that is hard. Now I could go to small shows and flea markets, set up some 2×4s on cinder blocks and do my thing, but I wanted to do big juried shows. This takes a little more planning. In fact it got down right frustrating at times when I thought I had everything I needed, and then discovered more things I forgot. I've been a small business owner for 7 years and thought this would be a piece of cake.

Canopy, tables, table cloths, merchant account, display stands, product containers for transport, bags, receipts, business license, sales tax number, business checking account. The list goes on and on. It actually took me a couple of months to get everything together before I could actually apply to my first show.

Now that I have some shows under my belt, I have to say that the canopy is the most important part of the traveling circus. Like many, I went the cheap route and bought an $250 Ez Up. This is by far the most popular canopy out there. It's also the best kite ever designed. At my first show, a large gust of wind came blowing through the show and 5 or 6 went flying across the street scattering crafts all over the place, and they had weights on each leg. I was lucky that I was sitting between two bigger tents that blocked some of the wind and I was spared. Two weeks later I spent $1000 and bought a Trimline.

Now the Ez Up is exactly what it says. I can get it up in five minutes and that includes taking a beer break in the middle. The Trimline takes 30 - 45 minutes to get up (without a beer break). However, when I leave it overnight at a show, I know that short of a hurricane, it will still be there the next morning. It only takes one time sitting in it during a down pour that I appreciate the fact that I bought it.

Old Ez Up
Plant Tent Table Tree Shade


New Trimline
Tent Plant Wheel Shade Tree


More to come….
Thanks for the info and insight. I always dream of selling my stuff but I know I never will, but I enjoy hearing how it goes.
 

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Part 1

I keep getting a lot of private messages from Lumberjocks asking questions about my boards and selling at shows so I decided to start talking about my experiences this year and maybe it will help those who want start the show circuit or are trying to decide if it's for them. I consider myself a newbie at it since I just started this year and I know there are a lot of jocks that have been doing shows for years, so I don't intend to write a "how to" guide, but document my journey into this carnivorous monster.

I started making cutting boards the first of the year when my cabinet and closet business decided to follow the economy into its downward spiral. Actually, I just needed something to occupy my time between long dry spells. I found a lot of people who liked the boards and were willing to buy the boards. After selling 20 or so, I figured that if I can do this with a small group of friends and their friends then what would happen if I had an audience of 2,000 10,000 or 20,000? Could I do it full time and do well enough to close my closet company?

So I hit up a woodworker friend that has successfully done shows for 15 years for advice. His first comment was "You don't realize what you are getting yourself into stud!" It took a while to realize what he meant by that. Doing shows is not that difficult. It's getting started that is hard. Now I could go to small shows and flea markets, set up some 2×4s on cinder blocks and do my thing, but I wanted to do big juried shows. This takes a little more planning. In fact it got down right frustrating at times when I thought I had everything I needed, and then discovered more things I forgot. I've been a small business owner for 7 years and thought this would be a piece of cake.

Canopy, tables, table cloths, merchant account, display stands, product containers for transport, bags, receipts, business license, sales tax number, business checking account. The list goes on and on. It actually took me a couple of months to get everything together before I could actually apply to my first show.

Now that I have some shows under my belt, I have to say that the canopy is the most important part of the traveling circus. Like many, I went the cheap route and bought an $250 Ez Up. This is by far the most popular canopy out there. It's also the best kite ever designed. At my first show, a large gust of wind came blowing through the show and 5 or 6 went flying across the street scattering crafts all over the place, and they had weights on each leg. I was lucky that I was sitting between two bigger tents that blocked some of the wind and I was spared. Two weeks later I spent $1000 and bought a Trimline.

Now the Ez Up is exactly what it says. I can get it up in five minutes and that includes taking a beer break in the middle. The Trimline takes 30 - 45 minutes to get up (without a beer break). However, when I leave it overnight at a show, I know that short of a hurricane, it will still be there the next morning. It only takes one time sitting in it during a down pour that I appreciate the fact that I bought it.

Old Ez Up
Plant Tent Table Tree Shade


New Trimline
Tent Plant Wheel Shade Tree


More to come….
Hey Dennis… just retracing your journey and starting at the beginning…
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
What do I know about table cloths?

The problem when putting everything together before doing the first show is that there are too many choices and price variations. For example, it took a while to decide on my booth layout. This drove how many and what size tables to buy. Once that was done I focused on table covers. I know I went through at least one bottle of Jack trying to figure this out. There are fitted table covers, skirted table covers, spandex table covers, table runners, etc. Again, the list goes on and on. The price for these options swings all over the place. The one thing that was certain, table covers are expensive! I looked at buying bed sheets from Wal-Mart, but this was just too cheesy.

I finally decided on fitted table covers figuring that because of the way they fit, they would be less susceptible to wind. It was a good decision. The next thing that drove me crazy was the color. There are at least 75 different colors to choose from and of course, being the anal person that I am, I agonized over this for at least a week. I finally chose brown. Why? I don't know. Maybe it spoke to me. However, this also was a good decision because when doing grass shows when it has been, or is raining, mud will get on the bottom of the table cloths. You will step on them and customers will step on them. Mud doesn't stand out like a sore thumb on brown covers. I spent $180 for four fitted table cloths. I have two 72×30 and two 48×24 tables. These were the least expensive table cloths I could find. They are polyester based and machine washable which is good because I have to wash them after at least every other show.

I bought tables at HD. The 72" ones have plastic tops and fold in the middle with a handle for carrying. The 48" ones don't fold and are a little heavier because they have a metal frame, but they work well. This was another $180. I was concerned about their load capacity, but I load them up with a lot of heavy cutting boards and they hold the weight very well. The good thing about the 72" tables is the legs are situated so that I have room to slide my transport boxes under the tables so that they are out of the way and out of site.

Now I don't consider myself a stupid person, I just do stupid things sometimes. I got this bright idea to buy this huge Rubbermaid container. This thing was about four feet long. The problem was when I filled it up with all the cutting boards, it weighed about 2000 pounds. I do the shows by myself so this wouldn't work. It wouldn't work if I had four strong men and a mule. So I found these really neat boxes at Lowes, They are called Tuff Boxes, are black and come with a bright yellow top. These things are really tuff. They can handle about six 12×16 boards along with a mix of smaller boards. Fully loaded, they weigh about 90 pounds, which are manageable. I wouldn't want to carry them up a flight a steps, but they work well with a hand truck or dolly. I have been fortunate to have done all shows that I could park at or very close to my booth to unload. I carry four boxes and I can store two under each 72" table. So it works well. It's amazing that I spent so much time finding the right transport box, but this is the way everything goes when setting up to do shows. Two steps forward and one step back until you find what works.

It's just like my booth setup. Someone here at the jocks posted pictures on a stepped, knock down, display holder for their cutting boards. It was an excellent idea, so I made a bunch of them up using different sizes for different size boards. Each one holds three boards and the widths vary depending on the size of the boards. I put them all together in the shop and they worked. At my first show, I was setting up the display stands, and I drew a blank and couldn't remember how the stands matched up. I spent about 45 minutes playing a shell game until I got them finally matched up and where they went on the table. After the show, I set my entire booth up in the shop, got everything where it was suppose to be and numbered all the display parts on the bottom with a permanent marker. At the next show, it took about 5 minutes to assemble the displays. This is one example of many processes I have had to change to speed setup.

Table Tire Plant Tablecloth Textile


Stay tuned….
 

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What do I know about table cloths?

The problem when putting everything together before doing the first show is that there are too many choices and price variations. For example, it took a while to decide on my booth layout. This drove how many and what size tables to buy. Once that was done I focused on table covers. I know I went through at least one bottle of Jack trying to figure this out. There are fitted table covers, skirted table covers, spandex table covers, table runners, etc. Again, the list goes on and on. The price for these options swings all over the place. The one thing that was certain, table covers are expensive! I looked at buying bed sheets from Wal-Mart, but this was just too cheesy.

I finally decided on fitted table covers figuring that because of the way they fit, they would be less susceptible to wind. It was a good decision. The next thing that drove me crazy was the color. There are at least 75 different colors to choose from and of course, being the anal person that I am, I agonized over this for at least a week. I finally chose brown. Why? I don't know. Maybe it spoke to me. However, this also was a good decision because when doing grass shows when it has been, or is raining, mud will get on the bottom of the table cloths. You will step on them and customers will step on them. Mud doesn't stand out like a sore thumb on brown covers. I spent $180 for four fitted table cloths. I have two 72×30 and two 48×24 tables. These were the least expensive table cloths I could find. They are polyester based and machine washable which is good because I have to wash them after at least every other show.

I bought tables at HD. The 72" ones have plastic tops and fold in the middle with a handle for carrying. The 48" ones don't fold and are a little heavier because they have a metal frame, but they work well. This was another $180. I was concerned about their load capacity, but I load them up with a lot of heavy cutting boards and they hold the weight very well. The good thing about the 72" tables is the legs are situated so that I have room to slide my transport boxes under the tables so that they are out of the way and out of site.

Now I don't consider myself a stupid person, I just do stupid things sometimes. I got this bright idea to buy this huge Rubbermaid container. This thing was about four feet long. The problem was when I filled it up with all the cutting boards, it weighed about 2000 pounds. I do the shows by myself so this wouldn't work. It wouldn't work if I had four strong men and a mule. So I found these really neat boxes at Lowes, They are called Tuff Boxes, are black and come with a bright yellow top. These things are really tuff. They can handle about six 12×16 boards along with a mix of smaller boards. Fully loaded, they weigh about 90 pounds, which are manageable. I wouldn't want to carry them up a flight a steps, but they work well with a hand truck or dolly. I have been fortunate to have done all shows that I could park at or very close to my booth to unload. I carry four boxes and I can store two under each 72" table. So it works well. It's amazing that I spent so much time finding the right transport box, but this is the way everything goes when setting up to do shows. Two steps forward and one step back until you find what works.

It's just like my booth setup. Someone here at the jocks posted pictures on a stepped, knock down, display holder for their cutting boards. It was an excellent idea, so I made a bunch of them up using different sizes for different size boards. Each one holds three boards and the widths vary depending on the size of the boards. I put them all together in the shop and they worked. At my first show, I was setting up the display stands, and I drew a blank and couldn't remember how the stands matched up. I spent about 45 minutes playing a shell game until I got them finally matched up and where they went on the table. After the show, I set my entire booth up in the shop, got everything where it was suppose to be and numbered all the display parts on the bottom with a permanent marker. At the next show, it took about 5 minutes to assemble the displays. This is one example of many processes I have had to change to speed setup.

Table Tire Plant Tablecloth Textile


Stay tuned….
Keep them coming. I really appreciate the insight.
 

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What do I know about table cloths?

The problem when putting everything together before doing the first show is that there are too many choices and price variations. For example, it took a while to decide on my booth layout. This drove how many and what size tables to buy. Once that was done I focused on table covers. I know I went through at least one bottle of Jack trying to figure this out. There are fitted table covers, skirted table covers, spandex table covers, table runners, etc. Again, the list goes on and on. The price for these options swings all over the place. The one thing that was certain, table covers are expensive! I looked at buying bed sheets from Wal-Mart, but this was just too cheesy.

I finally decided on fitted table covers figuring that because of the way they fit, they would be less susceptible to wind. It was a good decision. The next thing that drove me crazy was the color. There are at least 75 different colors to choose from and of course, being the anal person that I am, I agonized over this for at least a week. I finally chose brown. Why? I don't know. Maybe it spoke to me. However, this also was a good decision because when doing grass shows when it has been, or is raining, mud will get on the bottom of the table cloths. You will step on them and customers will step on them. Mud doesn't stand out like a sore thumb on brown covers. I spent $180 for four fitted table cloths. I have two 72×30 and two 48×24 tables. These were the least expensive table cloths I could find. They are polyester based and machine washable which is good because I have to wash them after at least every other show.

I bought tables at HD. The 72" ones have plastic tops and fold in the middle with a handle for carrying. The 48" ones don't fold and are a little heavier because they have a metal frame, but they work well. This was another $180. I was concerned about their load capacity, but I load them up with a lot of heavy cutting boards and they hold the weight very well. The good thing about the 72" tables is the legs are situated so that I have room to slide my transport boxes under the tables so that they are out of the way and out of site.

Now I don't consider myself a stupid person, I just do stupid things sometimes. I got this bright idea to buy this huge Rubbermaid container. This thing was about four feet long. The problem was when I filled it up with all the cutting boards, it weighed about 2000 pounds. I do the shows by myself so this wouldn't work. It wouldn't work if I had four strong men and a mule. So I found these really neat boxes at Lowes, They are called Tuff Boxes, are black and come with a bright yellow top. These things are really tuff. They can handle about six 12×16 boards along with a mix of smaller boards. Fully loaded, they weigh about 90 pounds, which are manageable. I wouldn't want to carry them up a flight a steps, but they work well with a hand truck or dolly. I have been fortunate to have done all shows that I could park at or very close to my booth to unload. I carry four boxes and I can store two under each 72" table. So it works well. It's amazing that I spent so much time finding the right transport box, but this is the way everything goes when setting up to do shows. Two steps forward and one step back until you find what works.

It's just like my booth setup. Someone here at the jocks posted pictures on a stepped, knock down, display holder for their cutting boards. It was an excellent idea, so I made a bunch of them up using different sizes for different size boards. Each one holds three boards and the widths vary depending on the size of the boards. I put them all together in the shop and they worked. At my first show, I was setting up the display stands, and I drew a blank and couldn't remember how the stands matched up. I spent about 45 minutes playing a shell game until I got them finally matched up and where they went on the table. After the show, I set my entire booth up in the shop, got everything where it was suppose to be and numbered all the display parts on the bottom with a permanent marker. At the next show, it took about 5 minutes to assemble the displays. This is one example of many processes I have had to change to speed setup.

Table Tire Plant Tablecloth Textile


Stay tuned….
closetguy, you have some nice pieces there on your display tables. How are things selling these days?
 

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What do I know about table cloths?

The problem when putting everything together before doing the first show is that there are too many choices and price variations. For example, it took a while to decide on my booth layout. This drove how many and what size tables to buy. Once that was done I focused on table covers. I know I went through at least one bottle of Jack trying to figure this out. There are fitted table covers, skirted table covers, spandex table covers, table runners, etc. Again, the list goes on and on. The price for these options swings all over the place. The one thing that was certain, table covers are expensive! I looked at buying bed sheets from Wal-Mart, but this was just too cheesy.

I finally decided on fitted table covers figuring that because of the way they fit, they would be less susceptible to wind. It was a good decision. The next thing that drove me crazy was the color. There are at least 75 different colors to choose from and of course, being the anal person that I am, I agonized over this for at least a week. I finally chose brown. Why? I don't know. Maybe it spoke to me. However, this also was a good decision because when doing grass shows when it has been, or is raining, mud will get on the bottom of the table cloths. You will step on them and customers will step on them. Mud doesn't stand out like a sore thumb on brown covers. I spent $180 for four fitted table cloths. I have two 72×30 and two 48×24 tables. These were the least expensive table cloths I could find. They are polyester based and machine washable which is good because I have to wash them after at least every other show.

I bought tables at HD. The 72" ones have plastic tops and fold in the middle with a handle for carrying. The 48" ones don't fold and are a little heavier because they have a metal frame, but they work well. This was another $180. I was concerned about their load capacity, but I load them up with a lot of heavy cutting boards and they hold the weight very well. The good thing about the 72" tables is the legs are situated so that I have room to slide my transport boxes under the tables so that they are out of the way and out of site.

Now I don't consider myself a stupid person, I just do stupid things sometimes. I got this bright idea to buy this huge Rubbermaid container. This thing was about four feet long. The problem was when I filled it up with all the cutting boards, it weighed about 2000 pounds. I do the shows by myself so this wouldn't work. It wouldn't work if I had four strong men and a mule. So I found these really neat boxes at Lowes, They are called Tuff Boxes, are black and come with a bright yellow top. These things are really tuff. They can handle about six 12×16 boards along with a mix of smaller boards. Fully loaded, they weigh about 90 pounds, which are manageable. I wouldn't want to carry them up a flight a steps, but they work well with a hand truck or dolly. I have been fortunate to have done all shows that I could park at or very close to my booth to unload. I carry four boxes and I can store two under each 72" table. So it works well. It's amazing that I spent so much time finding the right transport box, but this is the way everything goes when setting up to do shows. Two steps forward and one step back until you find what works.

It's just like my booth setup. Someone here at the jocks posted pictures on a stepped, knock down, display holder for their cutting boards. It was an excellent idea, so I made a bunch of them up using different sizes for different size boards. Each one holds three boards and the widths vary depending on the size of the boards. I put them all together in the shop and they worked. At my first show, I was setting up the display stands, and I drew a blank and couldn't remember how the stands matched up. I spent about 45 minutes playing a shell game until I got them finally matched up and where they went on the table. After the show, I set my entire booth up in the shop, got everything where it was suppose to be and numbered all the display parts on the bottom with a permanent marker. At the next show, it took about 5 minutes to assemble the displays. This is one example of many processes I have had to change to speed setup.

Table Tire Plant Tablecloth Textile


Stay tuned….
great stuff, Thanks
 

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What do I know about table cloths?

The problem when putting everything together before doing the first show is that there are too many choices and price variations. For example, it took a while to decide on my booth layout. This drove how many and what size tables to buy. Once that was done I focused on table covers. I know I went through at least one bottle of Jack trying to figure this out. There are fitted table covers, skirted table covers, spandex table covers, table runners, etc. Again, the list goes on and on. The price for these options swings all over the place. The one thing that was certain, table covers are expensive! I looked at buying bed sheets from Wal-Mart, but this was just too cheesy.

I finally decided on fitted table covers figuring that because of the way they fit, they would be less susceptible to wind. It was a good decision. The next thing that drove me crazy was the color. There are at least 75 different colors to choose from and of course, being the anal person that I am, I agonized over this for at least a week. I finally chose brown. Why? I don't know. Maybe it spoke to me. However, this also was a good decision because when doing grass shows when it has been, or is raining, mud will get on the bottom of the table cloths. You will step on them and customers will step on them. Mud doesn't stand out like a sore thumb on brown covers. I spent $180 for four fitted table cloths. I have two 72×30 and two 48×24 tables. These were the least expensive table cloths I could find. They are polyester based and machine washable which is good because I have to wash them after at least every other show.

I bought tables at HD. The 72" ones have plastic tops and fold in the middle with a handle for carrying. The 48" ones don't fold and are a little heavier because they have a metal frame, but they work well. This was another $180. I was concerned about their load capacity, but I load them up with a lot of heavy cutting boards and they hold the weight very well. The good thing about the 72" tables is the legs are situated so that I have room to slide my transport boxes under the tables so that they are out of the way and out of site.

Now I don't consider myself a stupid person, I just do stupid things sometimes. I got this bright idea to buy this huge Rubbermaid container. This thing was about four feet long. The problem was when I filled it up with all the cutting boards, it weighed about 2000 pounds. I do the shows by myself so this wouldn't work. It wouldn't work if I had four strong men and a mule. So I found these really neat boxes at Lowes, They are called Tuff Boxes, are black and come with a bright yellow top. These things are really tuff. They can handle about six 12×16 boards along with a mix of smaller boards. Fully loaded, they weigh about 90 pounds, which are manageable. I wouldn't want to carry them up a flight a steps, but they work well with a hand truck or dolly. I have been fortunate to have done all shows that I could park at or very close to my booth to unload. I carry four boxes and I can store two under each 72" table. So it works well. It's amazing that I spent so much time finding the right transport box, but this is the way everything goes when setting up to do shows. Two steps forward and one step back until you find what works.

It's just like my booth setup. Someone here at the jocks posted pictures on a stepped, knock down, display holder for their cutting boards. It was an excellent idea, so I made a bunch of them up using different sizes for different size boards. Each one holds three boards and the widths vary depending on the size of the boards. I put them all together in the shop and they worked. At my first show, I was setting up the display stands, and I drew a blank and couldn't remember how the stands matched up. I spent about 45 minutes playing a shell game until I got them finally matched up and where they went on the table. After the show, I set my entire booth up in the shop, got everything where it was suppose to be and numbered all the display parts on the bottom with a permanent marker. At the next show, it took about 5 minutes to assemble the displays. This is one example of many processes I have had to change to speed setup.

Table Tire Plant Tablecloth Textile


Stay tuned….
You have a beautiful display!!!! Thanks for the information and please keep us informed about your "show adventures".
 

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Getting it together

Ok, so I got my canopy, my tables, my brown table cloths, merchant account, my product, and all the government paperwork done so I am finally ready to do shows. I just need to fill out my contact information, send them a check and show up. Wrong! It seems that most shows, particularly the good ones, have an application due date that, in some cases, are 6 to 9 months prior to the show. I can see the school of "hard knocks" is kicking in and graduation is a long way off. I called up a promoter one day and we talked about getting into his show. His first question was what other shows have I done. I said none and he said "you need to do some small shows before you jump into my shows". "But I just spent $2000 getting ready to do these". "It doesn't make any difference, apply next year".

How do you spell misfire? So I subscribed to Sunshine Artist magazine to educate myself further and Festivalnet.com to find shows. I bought photo lights and umbrellas and shot good pictures of my products. I called my friend who does craft shows and listened to him go on and on about the jury process. So now I'm ready again. I found some recommended shows, but they wanted references from other shows. What's wrong with these people? I'm not applying for a credit card, just a damn show. Using Festivalnet.com, I found some small local shows. I had missed the due date, but I emailed them and asked if they were full. They were not and I sent them an application, pictures, a check, and surprise….. I got accepted!

One of the interesting things I have found with these shows is the jury process. The promoter makes a big deal about sending in slides or pictures. Some ask for digital pictures on CD. I wish all shows would use Zapplication.com. This is a web clearing house for juried shows. You upload your pictures one time, click on the shows you want to apply to, and it's done. Unfortunately, only a handful of shows use their service, but I have applied to some using this site.

The promoter generally wants 3 to 4 pictures of your product, plus one of your booth. They make a big deal out of this and you get the feeling that there is this high council in white robes sitting around a table analyzing your artistic style. But in reality, when you get to the show, you see "crafters" with sorry junk, booths made out of four poles and a blue tarp thrown over it, and some guy selling clocks with "Made in China" stamped on the bottom. This is what I have run into consistently at the small shows, particularly the ones that are put on by city governments or the chamber of commerce. They make a weak attempt at the jury process or just say it's juried for the prestige and don't really look at the pictures.

Now, during all this posturing and fretting over getting into shows, I am still making product everyday, or at least trying to. I live about 30 minutes from the local lumber yard. It is easy to kill 2 to 3 hours from the time I leave the shop until the time I return. Some days I can get in and out quickly, but some days it gets crowded. A lumber yard worker knew I had waited a long time to get my rough lumber one day and joked that "Everyone in Atlanta showed up today to buy a half a sheet of plywood". So I pick up 70 - 100 board feet of rough lumber, get back to the shop, and spend the rest of the day feeding it through the planer.

The next day I plan to rip boards all morning for the first glue up. I always try to do 10 boards at a time, regardless of size, to maximize my labor. As I start ripping, I notice the dust collector is full. Ok, stop and deal with that and waste 15 minutes emptying sawdust, get started again and UPS or FedEx shows up with a delivery, stop and deal with that. Then my daughter calls and wants to chit chat. After this is over, I sit down with a cup of coffee and a cigarette and try to remember what I was suppose to be doing and hour ago. Oh, yea, make money, stupid me.
 

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Getting it together

Ok, so I got my canopy, my tables, my brown table cloths, merchant account, my product, and all the government paperwork done so I am finally ready to do shows. I just need to fill out my contact information, send them a check and show up. Wrong! It seems that most shows, particularly the good ones, have an application due date that, in some cases, are 6 to 9 months prior to the show. I can see the school of "hard knocks" is kicking in and graduation is a long way off. I called up a promoter one day and we talked about getting into his show. His first question was what other shows have I done. I said none and he said "you need to do some small shows before you jump into my shows". "But I just spent $2000 getting ready to do these". "It doesn't make any difference, apply next year".

How do you spell misfire? So I subscribed to Sunshine Artist magazine to educate myself further and Festivalnet.com to find shows. I bought photo lights and umbrellas and shot good pictures of my products. I called my friend who does craft shows and listened to him go on and on about the jury process. So now I'm ready again. I found some recommended shows, but they wanted references from other shows. What's wrong with these people? I'm not applying for a credit card, just a damn show. Using Festivalnet.com, I found some small local shows. I had missed the due date, but I emailed them and asked if they were full. They were not and I sent them an application, pictures, a check, and surprise….. I got accepted!

One of the interesting things I have found with these shows is the jury process. The promoter makes a big deal about sending in slides or pictures. Some ask for digital pictures on CD. I wish all shows would use Zapplication.com. This is a web clearing house for juried shows. You upload your pictures one time, click on the shows you want to apply to, and it's done. Unfortunately, only a handful of shows use their service, but I have applied to some using this site.

The promoter generally wants 3 to 4 pictures of your product, plus one of your booth. They make a big deal out of this and you get the feeling that there is this high council in white robes sitting around a table analyzing your artistic style. But in reality, when you get to the show, you see "crafters" with sorry junk, booths made out of four poles and a blue tarp thrown over it, and some guy selling clocks with "Made in China" stamped on the bottom. This is what I have run into consistently at the small shows, particularly the ones that are put on by city governments or the chamber of commerce. They make a weak attempt at the jury process or just say it's juried for the prestige and don't really look at the pictures.

Now, during all this posturing and fretting over getting into shows, I am still making product everyday, or at least trying to. I live about 30 minutes from the local lumber yard. It is easy to kill 2 to 3 hours from the time I leave the shop until the time I return. Some days I can get in and out quickly, but some days it gets crowded. A lumber yard worker knew I had waited a long time to get my rough lumber one day and joked that "Everyone in Atlanta showed up today to buy a half a sheet of plywood". So I pick up 70 - 100 board feet of rough lumber, get back to the shop, and spend the rest of the day feeding it through the planer.

The next day I plan to rip boards all morning for the first glue up. I always try to do 10 boards at a time, regardless of size, to maximize my labor. As I start ripping, I notice the dust collector is full. Ok, stop and deal with that and waste 15 minutes emptying sawdust, get started again and UPS or FedEx shows up with a delivery, stop and deal with that. Then my daughter calls and wants to chit chat. After this is over, I sit down with a cup of coffee and a cigarette and try to remember what I was suppose to be doing and hour ago. Oh, yea, make money, stupid me.
Keep theses coming, I can sooooo relate. You are hitting so many points that parallel my experiences. My take on the "Jury Process" has more to do with how full the show is than the quality of your work. Yes the promoter wants a certain level of profesionalisim at his/her show but the bottom line is a so-so booth is better than an empty one. I try to attend a show the year before I apply. Zapplication rocks.
 

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Getting it together

Ok, so I got my canopy, my tables, my brown table cloths, merchant account, my product, and all the government paperwork done so I am finally ready to do shows. I just need to fill out my contact information, send them a check and show up. Wrong! It seems that most shows, particularly the good ones, have an application due date that, in some cases, are 6 to 9 months prior to the show. I can see the school of "hard knocks" is kicking in and graduation is a long way off. I called up a promoter one day and we talked about getting into his show. His first question was what other shows have I done. I said none and he said "you need to do some small shows before you jump into my shows". "But I just spent $2000 getting ready to do these". "It doesn't make any difference, apply next year".

How do you spell misfire? So I subscribed to Sunshine Artist magazine to educate myself further and Festivalnet.com to find shows. I bought photo lights and umbrellas and shot good pictures of my products. I called my friend who does craft shows and listened to him go on and on about the jury process. So now I'm ready again. I found some recommended shows, but they wanted references from other shows. What's wrong with these people? I'm not applying for a credit card, just a damn show. Using Festivalnet.com, I found some small local shows. I had missed the due date, but I emailed them and asked if they were full. They were not and I sent them an application, pictures, a check, and surprise….. I got accepted!

One of the interesting things I have found with these shows is the jury process. The promoter makes a big deal about sending in slides or pictures. Some ask for digital pictures on CD. I wish all shows would use Zapplication.com. This is a web clearing house for juried shows. You upload your pictures one time, click on the shows you want to apply to, and it's done. Unfortunately, only a handful of shows use their service, but I have applied to some using this site.

The promoter generally wants 3 to 4 pictures of your product, plus one of your booth. They make a big deal out of this and you get the feeling that there is this high council in white robes sitting around a table analyzing your artistic style. But in reality, when you get to the show, you see "crafters" with sorry junk, booths made out of four poles and a blue tarp thrown over it, and some guy selling clocks with "Made in China" stamped on the bottom. This is what I have run into consistently at the small shows, particularly the ones that are put on by city governments or the chamber of commerce. They make a weak attempt at the jury process or just say it's juried for the prestige and don't really look at the pictures.

Now, during all this posturing and fretting over getting into shows, I am still making product everyday, or at least trying to. I live about 30 minutes from the local lumber yard. It is easy to kill 2 to 3 hours from the time I leave the shop until the time I return. Some days I can get in and out quickly, but some days it gets crowded. A lumber yard worker knew I had waited a long time to get my rough lumber one day and joked that "Everyone in Atlanta showed up today to buy a half a sheet of plywood". So I pick up 70 - 100 board feet of rough lumber, get back to the shop, and spend the rest of the day feeding it through the planer.

The next day I plan to rip boards all morning for the first glue up. I always try to do 10 boards at a time, regardless of size, to maximize my labor. As I start ripping, I notice the dust collector is full. Ok, stop and deal with that and waste 15 minutes emptying sawdust, get started again and UPS or FedEx shows up with a delivery, stop and deal with that. Then my daughter calls and wants to chit chat. After this is over, I sit down with a cup of coffee and a cigarette and try to remember what I was suppose to be doing and hour ago. Oh, yea, make money, stupid me.
This is a very good series. Hearing your experiences is quite helpful.
 

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Getting it together

Ok, so I got my canopy, my tables, my brown table cloths, merchant account, my product, and all the government paperwork done so I am finally ready to do shows. I just need to fill out my contact information, send them a check and show up. Wrong! It seems that most shows, particularly the good ones, have an application due date that, in some cases, are 6 to 9 months prior to the show. I can see the school of "hard knocks" is kicking in and graduation is a long way off. I called up a promoter one day and we talked about getting into his show. His first question was what other shows have I done. I said none and he said "you need to do some small shows before you jump into my shows". "But I just spent $2000 getting ready to do these". "It doesn't make any difference, apply next year".

How do you spell misfire? So I subscribed to Sunshine Artist magazine to educate myself further and Festivalnet.com to find shows. I bought photo lights and umbrellas and shot good pictures of my products. I called my friend who does craft shows and listened to him go on and on about the jury process. So now I'm ready again. I found some recommended shows, but they wanted references from other shows. What's wrong with these people? I'm not applying for a credit card, just a damn show. Using Festivalnet.com, I found some small local shows. I had missed the due date, but I emailed them and asked if they were full. They were not and I sent them an application, pictures, a check, and surprise….. I got accepted!

One of the interesting things I have found with these shows is the jury process. The promoter makes a big deal about sending in slides or pictures. Some ask for digital pictures on CD. I wish all shows would use Zapplication.com. This is a web clearing house for juried shows. You upload your pictures one time, click on the shows you want to apply to, and it's done. Unfortunately, only a handful of shows use their service, but I have applied to some using this site.

The promoter generally wants 3 to 4 pictures of your product, plus one of your booth. They make a big deal out of this and you get the feeling that there is this high council in white robes sitting around a table analyzing your artistic style. But in reality, when you get to the show, you see "crafters" with sorry junk, booths made out of four poles and a blue tarp thrown over it, and some guy selling clocks with "Made in China" stamped on the bottom. This is what I have run into consistently at the small shows, particularly the ones that are put on by city governments or the chamber of commerce. They make a weak attempt at the jury process or just say it's juried for the prestige and don't really look at the pictures.

Now, during all this posturing and fretting over getting into shows, I am still making product everyday, or at least trying to. I live about 30 minutes from the local lumber yard. It is easy to kill 2 to 3 hours from the time I leave the shop until the time I return. Some days I can get in and out quickly, but some days it gets crowded. A lumber yard worker knew I had waited a long time to get my rough lumber one day and joked that "Everyone in Atlanta showed up today to buy a half a sheet of plywood". So I pick up 70 - 100 board feet of rough lumber, get back to the shop, and spend the rest of the day feeding it through the planer.

The next day I plan to rip boards all morning for the first glue up. I always try to do 10 boards at a time, regardless of size, to maximize my labor. As I start ripping, I notice the dust collector is full. Ok, stop and deal with that and waste 15 minutes emptying sawdust, get started again and UPS or FedEx shows up with a delivery, stop and deal with that. Then my daughter calls and wants to chit chat. After this is over, I sit down with a cup of coffee and a cigarette and try to remember what I was suppose to be doing and hour ago. Oh, yea, make money, stupid me.
I am also just loving this series. I have often thought about the craft circuit, ....not too sure now after your posts…..

well written posts also.
 

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Getting it together

Ok, so I got my canopy, my tables, my brown table cloths, merchant account, my product, and all the government paperwork done so I am finally ready to do shows. I just need to fill out my contact information, send them a check and show up. Wrong! It seems that most shows, particularly the good ones, have an application due date that, in some cases, are 6 to 9 months prior to the show. I can see the school of "hard knocks" is kicking in and graduation is a long way off. I called up a promoter one day and we talked about getting into his show. His first question was what other shows have I done. I said none and he said "you need to do some small shows before you jump into my shows". "But I just spent $2000 getting ready to do these". "It doesn't make any difference, apply next year".

How do you spell misfire? So I subscribed to Sunshine Artist magazine to educate myself further and Festivalnet.com to find shows. I bought photo lights and umbrellas and shot good pictures of my products. I called my friend who does craft shows and listened to him go on and on about the jury process. So now I'm ready again. I found some recommended shows, but they wanted references from other shows. What's wrong with these people? I'm not applying for a credit card, just a damn show. Using Festivalnet.com, I found some small local shows. I had missed the due date, but I emailed them and asked if they were full. They were not and I sent them an application, pictures, a check, and surprise….. I got accepted!

One of the interesting things I have found with these shows is the jury process. The promoter makes a big deal about sending in slides or pictures. Some ask for digital pictures on CD. I wish all shows would use Zapplication.com. This is a web clearing house for juried shows. You upload your pictures one time, click on the shows you want to apply to, and it's done. Unfortunately, only a handful of shows use their service, but I have applied to some using this site.

The promoter generally wants 3 to 4 pictures of your product, plus one of your booth. They make a big deal out of this and you get the feeling that there is this high council in white robes sitting around a table analyzing your artistic style. But in reality, when you get to the show, you see "crafters" with sorry junk, booths made out of four poles and a blue tarp thrown over it, and some guy selling clocks with "Made in China" stamped on the bottom. This is what I have run into consistently at the small shows, particularly the ones that are put on by city governments or the chamber of commerce. They make a weak attempt at the jury process or just say it's juried for the prestige and don't really look at the pictures.

Now, during all this posturing and fretting over getting into shows, I am still making product everyday, or at least trying to. I live about 30 minutes from the local lumber yard. It is easy to kill 2 to 3 hours from the time I leave the shop until the time I return. Some days I can get in and out quickly, but some days it gets crowded. A lumber yard worker knew I had waited a long time to get my rough lumber one day and joked that "Everyone in Atlanta showed up today to buy a half a sheet of plywood". So I pick up 70 - 100 board feet of rough lumber, get back to the shop, and spend the rest of the day feeding it through the planer.

The next day I plan to rip boards all morning for the first glue up. I always try to do 10 boards at a time, regardless of size, to maximize my labor. As I start ripping, I notice the dust collector is full. Ok, stop and deal with that and waste 15 minutes emptying sawdust, get started again and UPS or FedEx shows up with a delivery, stop and deal with that. Then my daughter calls and wants to chit chat. After this is over, I sit down with a cup of coffee and a cigarette and try to remember what I was suppose to be doing and hour ago. Oh, yea, make money, stupid me.
I really enjoy this blog and hope that you keep them comming. It is so much like how things tend to go and so well written. thanks
 

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Getting it together

Ok, so I got my canopy, my tables, my brown table cloths, merchant account, my product, and all the government paperwork done so I am finally ready to do shows. I just need to fill out my contact information, send them a check and show up. Wrong! It seems that most shows, particularly the good ones, have an application due date that, in some cases, are 6 to 9 months prior to the show. I can see the school of "hard knocks" is kicking in and graduation is a long way off. I called up a promoter one day and we talked about getting into his show. His first question was what other shows have I done. I said none and he said "you need to do some small shows before you jump into my shows". "But I just spent $2000 getting ready to do these". "It doesn't make any difference, apply next year".

How do you spell misfire? So I subscribed to Sunshine Artist magazine to educate myself further and Festivalnet.com to find shows. I bought photo lights and umbrellas and shot good pictures of my products. I called my friend who does craft shows and listened to him go on and on about the jury process. So now I'm ready again. I found some recommended shows, but they wanted references from other shows. What's wrong with these people? I'm not applying for a credit card, just a damn show. Using Festivalnet.com, I found some small local shows. I had missed the due date, but I emailed them and asked if they were full. They were not and I sent them an application, pictures, a check, and surprise….. I got accepted!

One of the interesting things I have found with these shows is the jury process. The promoter makes a big deal about sending in slides or pictures. Some ask for digital pictures on CD. I wish all shows would use Zapplication.com. This is a web clearing house for juried shows. You upload your pictures one time, click on the shows you want to apply to, and it's done. Unfortunately, only a handful of shows use their service, but I have applied to some using this site.

The promoter generally wants 3 to 4 pictures of your product, plus one of your booth. They make a big deal out of this and you get the feeling that there is this high council in white robes sitting around a table analyzing your artistic style. But in reality, when you get to the show, you see "crafters" with sorry junk, booths made out of four poles and a blue tarp thrown over it, and some guy selling clocks with "Made in China" stamped on the bottom. This is what I have run into consistently at the small shows, particularly the ones that are put on by city governments or the chamber of commerce. They make a weak attempt at the jury process or just say it's juried for the prestige and don't really look at the pictures.

Now, during all this posturing and fretting over getting into shows, I am still making product everyday, or at least trying to. I live about 30 minutes from the local lumber yard. It is easy to kill 2 to 3 hours from the time I leave the shop until the time I return. Some days I can get in and out quickly, but some days it gets crowded. A lumber yard worker knew I had waited a long time to get my rough lumber one day and joked that "Everyone in Atlanta showed up today to buy a half a sheet of plywood". So I pick up 70 - 100 board feet of rough lumber, get back to the shop, and spend the rest of the day feeding it through the planer.

The next day I plan to rip boards all morning for the first glue up. I always try to do 10 boards at a time, regardless of size, to maximize my labor. As I start ripping, I notice the dust collector is full. Ok, stop and deal with that and waste 15 minutes emptying sawdust, get started again and UPS or FedEx shows up with a delivery, stop and deal with that. Then my daughter calls and wants to chit chat. After this is over, I sit down with a cup of coffee and a cigarette and try to remember what I was suppose to be doing and hour ago. Oh, yea, make money, stupid me.
Thanks for the post.
 

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Getting it together

Ok, so I got my canopy, my tables, my brown table cloths, merchant account, my product, and all the government paperwork done so I am finally ready to do shows. I just need to fill out my contact information, send them a check and show up. Wrong! It seems that most shows, particularly the good ones, have an application due date that, in some cases, are 6 to 9 months prior to the show. I can see the school of "hard knocks" is kicking in and graduation is a long way off. I called up a promoter one day and we talked about getting into his show. His first question was what other shows have I done. I said none and he said "you need to do some small shows before you jump into my shows". "But I just spent $2000 getting ready to do these". "It doesn't make any difference, apply next year".

How do you spell misfire? So I subscribed to Sunshine Artist magazine to educate myself further and Festivalnet.com to find shows. I bought photo lights and umbrellas and shot good pictures of my products. I called my friend who does craft shows and listened to him go on and on about the jury process. So now I'm ready again. I found some recommended shows, but they wanted references from other shows. What's wrong with these people? I'm not applying for a credit card, just a damn show. Using Festivalnet.com, I found some small local shows. I had missed the due date, but I emailed them and asked if they were full. They were not and I sent them an application, pictures, a check, and surprise….. I got accepted!

One of the interesting things I have found with these shows is the jury process. The promoter makes a big deal about sending in slides or pictures. Some ask for digital pictures on CD. I wish all shows would use Zapplication.com. This is a web clearing house for juried shows. You upload your pictures one time, click on the shows you want to apply to, and it's done. Unfortunately, only a handful of shows use their service, but I have applied to some using this site.

The promoter generally wants 3 to 4 pictures of your product, plus one of your booth. They make a big deal out of this and you get the feeling that there is this high council in white robes sitting around a table analyzing your artistic style. But in reality, when you get to the show, you see "crafters" with sorry junk, booths made out of four poles and a blue tarp thrown over it, and some guy selling clocks with "Made in China" stamped on the bottom. This is what I have run into consistently at the small shows, particularly the ones that are put on by city governments or the chamber of commerce. They make a weak attempt at the jury process or just say it's juried for the prestige and don't really look at the pictures.

Now, during all this posturing and fretting over getting into shows, I am still making product everyday, or at least trying to. I live about 30 minutes from the local lumber yard. It is easy to kill 2 to 3 hours from the time I leave the shop until the time I return. Some days I can get in and out quickly, but some days it gets crowded. A lumber yard worker knew I had waited a long time to get my rough lumber one day and joked that "Everyone in Atlanta showed up today to buy a half a sheet of plywood". So I pick up 70 - 100 board feet of rough lumber, get back to the shop, and spend the rest of the day feeding it through the planer.

The next day I plan to rip boards all morning for the first glue up. I always try to do 10 boards at a time, regardless of size, to maximize my labor. As I start ripping, I notice the dust collector is full. Ok, stop and deal with that and waste 15 minutes emptying sawdust, get started again and UPS or FedEx shows up with a delivery, stop and deal with that. Then my daughter calls and wants to chit chat. After this is over, I sit down with a cup of coffee and a cigarette and try to remember what I was suppose to be doing and hour ago. Oh, yea, make money, stupid me.
I'm getting a kick out of it too. Last year I did one small show, just to get my feet wet. Didn't have a tent…so it rained. Didn't have time to build any "small stuff"...so I didn't sell a thing. Had a blast! Not sure if i will ever try it again.
 

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Registered
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18,890 Posts
Getting it together

Ok, so I got my canopy, my tables, my brown table cloths, merchant account, my product, and all the government paperwork done so I am finally ready to do shows. I just need to fill out my contact information, send them a check and show up. Wrong! It seems that most shows, particularly the good ones, have an application due date that, in some cases, are 6 to 9 months prior to the show. I can see the school of "hard knocks" is kicking in and graduation is a long way off. I called up a promoter one day and we talked about getting into his show. His first question was what other shows have I done. I said none and he said "you need to do some small shows before you jump into my shows". "But I just spent $2000 getting ready to do these". "It doesn't make any difference, apply next year".

How do you spell misfire? So I subscribed to Sunshine Artist magazine to educate myself further and Festivalnet.com to find shows. I bought photo lights and umbrellas and shot good pictures of my products. I called my friend who does craft shows and listened to him go on and on about the jury process. So now I'm ready again. I found some recommended shows, but they wanted references from other shows. What's wrong with these people? I'm not applying for a credit card, just a damn show. Using Festivalnet.com, I found some small local shows. I had missed the due date, but I emailed them and asked if they were full. They were not and I sent them an application, pictures, a check, and surprise….. I got accepted!

One of the interesting things I have found with these shows is the jury process. The promoter makes a big deal about sending in slides or pictures. Some ask for digital pictures on CD. I wish all shows would use Zapplication.com. This is a web clearing house for juried shows. You upload your pictures one time, click on the shows you want to apply to, and it's done. Unfortunately, only a handful of shows use their service, but I have applied to some using this site.

The promoter generally wants 3 to 4 pictures of your product, plus one of your booth. They make a big deal out of this and you get the feeling that there is this high council in white robes sitting around a table analyzing your artistic style. But in reality, when you get to the show, you see "crafters" with sorry junk, booths made out of four poles and a blue tarp thrown over it, and some guy selling clocks with "Made in China" stamped on the bottom. This is what I have run into consistently at the small shows, particularly the ones that are put on by city governments or the chamber of commerce. They make a weak attempt at the jury process or just say it's juried for the prestige and don't really look at the pictures.

Now, during all this posturing and fretting over getting into shows, I am still making product everyday, or at least trying to. I live about 30 minutes from the local lumber yard. It is easy to kill 2 to 3 hours from the time I leave the shop until the time I return. Some days I can get in and out quickly, but some days it gets crowded. A lumber yard worker knew I had waited a long time to get my rough lumber one day and joked that "Everyone in Atlanta showed up today to buy a half a sheet of plywood". So I pick up 70 - 100 board feet of rough lumber, get back to the shop, and spend the rest of the day feeding it through the planer.

The next day I plan to rip boards all morning for the first glue up. I always try to do 10 boards at a time, regardless of size, to maximize my labor. As I start ripping, I notice the dust collector is full. Ok, stop and deal with that and waste 15 minutes emptying sawdust, get started again and UPS or FedEx shows up with a delivery, stop and deal with that. Then my daughter calls and wants to chit chat. After this is over, I sit down with a cup of coffee and a cigarette and try to remember what I was suppose to be doing and hour ago. Oh, yea, make money, stupid me.
you are a good writer!! Perhaps you could make some extra money buy finding a good magazine for this to go in.
 
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