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Can anyone opine on the advantages and disadvantages of buying a conventional drum sander versus a V Drum Sander?

I will not be using the sander to modify the thickness or flatten the board. I will only be using it to sand an already flat surface on a board that is already at the right thickness.

While you are at it, can anyone tell me why a V Drum Sander is called a V Drum Sander?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The article Top sent me to is very interesting and I finally know where the term "V drum" came from. Thanks. I'm still trying to decide between buying a conventional drum sander or a V drum sander.

With respect to V drum sanders, Stockroom Supply sells a kit at a reasonable price. SAND FLEE sells a complete unit that is ready to go but it is, in my opinion, expensive at $749 for a 24 inch unit. OTOH, a 24 inch conventional drum sander would cost more than that.
 

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Hey Rich, I have both. I have not had a lot of time on the V-Drum, but it is pretty cool. But I do really really like my standard drum sander.

I see them as two different tools:
The V_Drum is an abrasive Jointer.
The Drum sander is an abrasive Planer or thicknesser.

The same reason that I have both a jointer and a planer is why I have both sanders.

The thicknesser is at least twice the cost of a V-Drum.

If I had to pick one, I would go with the thicknessing drum sander. I have been using it for every project since I got it. I just love it and it is extremely accurate. I can not see using a thicknessing drum sander without power feed for the same reason as a planer is power fed, so this leaves out homemade unless you are really clever. (I have a lot of homemade tools, so I am not being snitty here). The thicknesser will generate a lot of dust, like a planer will chips, so you have to have a good DC. The V-Drum is quiet and clean just like a jointer.

Steve
 

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I have a Delta 16-32 Drum sander. Like SPalm I love mine and use it all the time. I will I am sure also build a velcro sander in the future. I think it has attributes that will compliment the drum just as Spalm stated. It stays cooler, will take out the burn marks my drum creates, run finer grit for finishing, and flatten. I saw this article a while back in Wood Magazine Nov. 2009. It looks like a easy adaptation of my drum sander for some of the things I would want a v sander to do. (jointing primarily) I think the picture is overly simplified, I would build fences along the sides to joint at 90 degrees and give the table some integrity. also thought about running the table half way through the drum to start with to give the infeed and outfeed different elevations like a real jointer…

http://woodmagazine.coverleaf.com/woodmagazine/200911?u1=coverleaf&pg=12#pg12
 
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