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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a very old, wooden chair, probably from the 50’s. I'm rather certain that it is oak. Someone had painted it gray prior to me getting it. I’ve now gotten the paint off and have sanded it silky smooth. I’d’ like to put a protective coating on it BUT I’m looking for something that will not darken the wood. The photo doesn’t do justice as when freshly sanded, the wood is rather light.
What suggestions might you have?

Thank you.
 

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If you paint with something, then spoil .... It will turn out dirty and spoiled. Top coat with clear varnish or water-based polymer only. Interesting to see the end result...
 

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I would go with a water based poly finish. Water based imparts no color, it is clear but goes on milky colored so it is easy to see drips and sags as you apply it.

As for age: 50 years is considered Vintage but you have to be over 100 for antique. So it is in the mid vintage age and so is John...LOL

OK so as I write this there is an add that popped up on the side panel that said:
"Don't piss off the old folks. The older you get the less a live sentence in prison becomes a deterrent."....and I would add you get three meals, a bunk, and fully paid medical care.
 

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I recently tested several clear finishes on white maple to see which one was the most clear. All of the oil based polyurethanes yellowed the white maple - a lot!. General Finish water based (semi gloss) was the clear winner; the white wood still looks white after three coats.

Osmo PolyX #3043 clear satin came in number 2. It slightly darkened or yellowed the white wood, but not by much. With Osmo PolyX only two coats are recommended.

I restored an oak U.S. Navy chair that was made in 1943. I did use a golden oak stain on the chair, followed by two coats of Osmo PolyX #3043 clear satin. It resulted in a beautiful, natural looking finish. Polyurethane finishes look a little plasticky to me. If I were refinishing an oak chair without staining it, I would definitely use Osmo PolyX. Here is a link to the oak chair that I restored:

 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I did check out your post and commented. Great job.!!! Am I to understand you spoke of two products; the Osmo Poly X and also Osmo Pole X #3034?? Is this available at the usual suspects - HD, Lowes, Ace? Thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you - I'll check that out. Thanks Les
I did check out your post and commented. Great job.!!! Am I to understand you spoke of two products; the Osmo Poly X and also Osmo Pole X #3034?? Is this available at the usual suspects - HD, Lowes, Ace? Thank you, Oregon
 

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I did check out your post and commented. Great job.!!! Am I to understand you spoke of two products; the Osmo Poly X and also Osmo Pole X #3034?? Is this available at the usual suspects - HD, Lowes, Ace? Thank you.
Osmo Poly X #3043 (clear satin) for both - I just left off the 3043 the second time that I mentioned it. You probably will not find it at the stores you mentioned, but you will find it at stores specializing in woodworking. And on-line is a good way to buy it.

It is made in Germany and at first glance, it seems expensive. But actually it is not. Two reasons; only two coats are needed (most polyurethanes need three coats). The second reason is that a little goes a long, long way! It takes less than half the volume of Osmo PolyX than it would take for polyurethane.

There are various ways to apply it but the best way is to use a white Norton non-abrasive pad. Rub it in as you would to wax a car. After ten minutes, using a clean Norton pad wipe off the excess. Let it set overnight, then buff it with 0000 steel wool. Then apply a second coat, following the same steps as with the first coat. When that second coat has dried, you're done. You don't need to buff the second coat after it dries with 0000 steel wool.

It is important to buff with 0000 steel wool after the first coat has dried. If you don't, the final finish will be flat with no sheen.

This finish is so easy to apply. Runs or brush marks will not be an issue. Unlike polyurethane, a year later if you need to touch up a spot, it is very easy to blend in; just buff the area with 0000 steel wool and rub in more Osmo PolyX. And the best thing of all is the beautiful, natural looking finish that it gives.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Osmo Poly X #3043 (clear satin) for both - I just left off the 3043 the second time that I mentioned it. You probably will not find it at the stores you mentioned, but you will find it at stores specializing in woodworking. And on-line is a good way to buy it.

It is made in Germany and at first glance, it seems expensive. But actually it is not. Two reasons; only two coats are needed (most polyurethanes need three coats). The second reason is that a little goes a long, long way! It takes less than half the volume of Osmo PolyX than it would take for polyurethane.

There are various ways to apply it but the best way is to use a white Norton non-abrasive pad. Rub it in as you would to wax a car. After ten minutes, using a clean Norton pad wipe off the excess. Let it set overnight, then buff it with 0000 steel wool. Then apply a second coat, following the same steps as with the first coat. When that second coat has dried, you're done. You don't need to buff the second coat after it dries with 0000 steel wool.

It is important to buff with 0000 steel wool after the first coat has dried. If you don't, the final finish will be flat with no sheen.

This finish is so easy to apply. Runs or brush marks will not be an issue. Unlike polyurethane, a year later if you need to touch up a spot, it is very easy to blend in; just buff the area with 0000 steel wool and rub in more Osmo PolyX. And the best thing of all is the beautiful, natural looking finish that it gives.
Thank you for all the info.
 
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