LumberJocks Woodworking Forum banner
  • Please post in our Community Feedback thread for help with the new forum software! If you are having trouble logging in, please Contact Us for assistance.
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Beginning CNC Thoughts

This is just going to be a place for me to track my learning and share anything I develop along the way. Hopefully I'll have a few good conversations and get advice as well.

My woodworking joys are varied, but probably mostly focus on furniture. I really enjoy the process of reverse-engineering chairs like the Spanish chair, CH25, Eames Stools and making my own versions. I'm a horrible guitar player but enjoy the hobby.

All of that led me to want to give CNC a try. Capstone CNC projects in my mind right now are
1) a mostly carved Windsor Seat
2) A "as close to ready to finish as makes sense" CH-25 / Cuba Chair
3) Multiple Guitars (Body and Neck)
4) a set of molding planes that can be parametrically changed to meet different needs
5) If this works, maybe a Papa Bear chair that is ready for upholstery

I started sometime during the pandemic with a mid-quality 3d Printer. I used that to help me learn Fusion 360 and, I thought, the basic ideas of the tool chains I might need for CNC.

I recently ordered a OneFinity Woodworker X50 and I am a month or two away from expected delivery. Since I placed the order, I have been diving into Fusion to develop some initial projects as well as diving into understanding the onefinity and modifications / improvements that I am going to need on day one.

I'll have some catching up to do on how far I've made it up to today, but here is a look at the list of projects I am starting to save up.
Rectangle Font Screenshot Software Technology
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Onefinity and Tracking Costs

I thought it would be interesting to track the real cost of CNC and see if/when I can find my own "break even". The TLDR (Too long didn't read) is that I'm at $4726 in costs at this point.

For me, break even is the point when the projects pay for the cost of the hardware and material to get there. It is probably not a fair assessment as i'm not profiting, but for me this is a hobby and its just a way to track for fun. Also, there are a lot more costs to factor into a CNC than I was expecting and more than one late game surprise, so I hope this helps someone realize additional items to take into account when they budget.

My decision on onefinity really came down to - Near enough to my budget and, from what I can tell, its likely to be the most stable for maintaining accuracy in the price range due to the drive system.

I have one stall of a garage that sort of expands into the rest of the garage as I need it, so one of my desires was something that could either serve dual-duty (tabletop and cnc) or fold out of the way. I ended up going the folding route/

My first order was the onefinity system. I kind of went all in due to the folding ability. I'm a little worried about the lack of stability in the base, but it was a tradeoff I needed to make for storage.

$2329 - Onefinity Woodworker X50
$378 - Woodworker QCW - Secure from beneath ( I selected beneath because its folding so easy access and less machining of the wasteboard required
$368 - Folding leg kit
$93 - 3 axis Touch Probe - Ordered this a bit in ignorance. I am learning that maybe any probe can work, but I am not certain
$67 - Suckit Dust boot - I want to start out with dust control as part of my overall maintenance plan. Reviews on this are a bit mixed (sounds like it has risk of breaking) but I'll see about making my own later on.

Two items are missing from this that they typically sell with the system
1) Monitor - Reviews of the 7" that they sell with the system aren't good. The onefinity forum helped me identify what to look for in a monitor and I went with
$199- Gstory touch screen. I have an extra monitor and keyboard, but all reviews say that the touch screen is a must.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B09G6CLPT2/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
- I'm going to have to have a future post on how I mount the monitor, i have no clue until I see how the system folds up.

2) Joystick - I have an extra corded xbox controller. I plan to see if that works first.

$3905 - Total order for the base machine

That doesn't quite get us all the way. Still missing - Router, Bits, Spoil Board, Clamps, cable management, vacuum management.
$121 - Makita RT1701 is the universally agreed non-spindle solution.
$60 - Sheet of MDF 4×8'. I plan to use this for the spoil board as well as some initial test projects

$4086 - New total cost

I started with some general advice on bits along with looking at some of the operations I knew I would want.
My goals
1) Slab Flattening
2) Guitar specific (Long bits and very fine fret bit
3) general cutting - 1/4, 1/8
4) Inlay bit - small angle vbit
5) sign wording - Large angle vbit

With amana and Whiteside bits having libraries you can just pull in to Fusion 360, I opted to go for those, even though they were a little more pricey than generic

1) Slab Flattening - I liked the replaceable cutters and size on this
$140 - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00O4TEBT4/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
2) Guitar Specific
$43 - Fret slot sized - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08TV2H6GJ/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
$63 - Deep cut https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07GBFXPF1/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
3) General Cutting
$80 of 1/8, 1/16, 1/32 from https://www.ebay.com/usr/drillman1?_trksid=p2047675.m3561.l2559
$60 - Tapered Ball - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07413K89F/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&th=1
$31 - 1/4 down cut https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B072J4CPQT/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&th=1

4) inlay bit - $30 spectool vbit from amazon - I went cheaper here because I expect to mess up and break this.

5) Sign wording -
$30 - 90 degree replaceable cutter https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003DCMDRU/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&th=1

Total Bits - $477

$4563 - New total cost

I'm using the 3d printer to get to the cable management in my wait-period. I am using
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4619804
for the majority of it
With three pieces from here for the woodworker
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4996178

I'm using up old filament, but for the sake of costs, lets call it
$30 Filament
$24 - Aluminum L channel
$36 - Drag Chain - The forums seem to suggest its not worth the cost/effort/quality to print your own drag chain.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07WQ8P3PZ/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
$30 - Longer cables from Etsy that I believe are required with the cable runs.
https://www.etsy.com/listing/978088944/onefinity-cnc-drag-chain-extended-wires?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=onefinity+cable&ref=sr_gallery-1-1&sts=1&organic_search_click=1&variation0=2164077242
$4683 - New total Cost

Ooops - Forgot that I purchased a Makita 1/8" collet for some of the generic bits
$43

$4726 - Running Tally. My original expectation was $3500ish to get started, yikes.

I'm starting to look at hardware required to make my own clamps. I'll add that price in a future post.
I'm also going to 3d print (once I understand what makes sense with my folding system) a dust boom arm, probe storage, wrench storage, router switch protection, who knows what more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
119 Posts
Onefinity and Tracking Costs

I thought it would be interesting to track the real cost of CNC and see if/when I can find my own "break even". The TLDR (Too long didn't read) is that I'm at $4726 in costs at this point.

For me, break even is the point when the projects pay for the cost of the hardware and material to get there. It is probably not a fair assessment as i'm not profiting, but for me this is a hobby and its just a way to track for fun. Also, there are a lot more costs to factor into a CNC than I was expecting and more than one late game surprise, so I hope this helps someone realize additional items to take into account when they budget.

My decision on onefinity really came down to - Near enough to my budget and, from what I can tell, its likely to be the most stable for maintaining accuracy in the price range due to the drive system.

I have one stall of a garage that sort of expands into the rest of the garage as I need it, so one of my desires was something that could either serve dual-duty (tabletop and cnc) or fold out of the way. I ended up going the folding route/

My first order was the onefinity system. I kind of went all in due to the folding ability. I'm a little worried about the lack of stability in the base, but it was a tradeoff I needed to make for storage.

$2329 - Onefinity Woodworker X50
$378 - Woodworker QCW - Secure from beneath ( I selected beneath because its folding so easy access and less machining of the wasteboard required
$368 - Folding leg kit
$93 - 3 axis Touch Probe - Ordered this a bit in ignorance. I am learning that maybe any probe can work, but I am not certain
$67 - Suckit Dust boot - I want to start out with dust control as part of my overall maintenance plan. Reviews on this are a bit mixed (sounds like it has risk of breaking) but I'll see about making my own later on.

Two items are missing from this that they typically sell with the system
1) Monitor - Reviews of the 7" that they sell with the system aren't good. The onefinity forum helped me identify what to look for in a monitor and I went with
$199- Gstory touch screen. I have an extra monitor and keyboard, but all reviews say that the touch screen is a must.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B09G6CLPT2/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
- I'm going to have to have a future post on how I mount the monitor, i have no clue until I see how the system folds up.

2) Joystick - I have an extra corded xbox controller. I plan to see if that works first.

$3905 - Total order for the base machine

That doesn't quite get us all the way. Still missing - Router, Bits, Spoil Board, Clamps, cable management, vacuum management.
$121 - Makita RT1701 is the universally agreed non-spindle solution.
$60 - Sheet of MDF 4×8'. I plan to use this for the spoil board as well as some initial test projects

$4086 - New total cost

I started with some general advice on bits along with looking at some of the operations I knew I would want.
My goals
1) Slab Flattening
2) Guitar specific (Long bits and very fine fret bit
3) general cutting - 1/4, 1/8
4) Inlay bit - small angle vbit
5) sign wording - Large angle vbit

With amana and Whiteside bits having libraries you can just pull in to Fusion 360, I opted to go for those, even though they were a little more pricey than generic

1) Slab Flattening - I liked the replaceable cutters and size on this
$140 - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00O4TEBT4/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
2) Guitar Specific
$43 - Fret slot sized - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08TV2H6GJ/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
$63 - Deep cut https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07GBFXPF1/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
3) General Cutting
$80 of 1/8, 1/16, 1/32 from https://www.ebay.com/usr/drillman1?_trksid=p2047675.m3561.l2559
$60 - Tapered Ball - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07413K89F/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&th=1
$31 - 1/4 down cut https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B072J4CPQT/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&th=1

4) inlay bit - $30 spectool vbit from amazon - I went cheaper here because I expect to mess up and break this.

5) Sign wording -
$30 - 90 degree replaceable cutter https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003DCMDRU/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&th=1

Total Bits - $477

$4563 - New total cost

I'm using the 3d printer to get to the cable management in my wait-period. I am using
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4619804
for the majority of it
With three pieces from here for the woodworker
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4996178

I'm using up old filament, but for the sake of costs, lets call it
$30 Filament
$24 - Aluminum L channel
$36 - Drag Chain - The forums seem to suggest its not worth the cost/effort/quality to print your own drag chain.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07WQ8P3PZ/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
$30 - Longer cables from Etsy that I believe are required with the cable runs.
https://www.etsy.com/listing/978088944/onefinity-cnc-drag-chain-extended-wires?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=onefinity+cable&ref=sr_gallery-1-1&sts=1&organic_search_click=1&variation0=2164077242
$4683 - New total Cost

Ooops - Forgot that I purchased a Makita 1/8" collet for some of the generic bits
$43

$4726 - Running Tally. My original expectation was $3500ish to get started, yikes.

I'm starting to look at hardware required to make my own clamps. I'll add that price in a future post.
I'm also going to 3d print (once I understand what makes sense with my folding system) a dust boom arm, probe storage, wrench storage, router switch protection, who knows what more.
The costs do add up fast!

I have a few of those bits. The Amana 45711 slab flattening bit is great. However, I only use it for flattening hardwood slabs and not the MDF spoil board. I run it at 15000rpm and 180 IPM, taking about .05" per pass. My machine uses a 2.2kw spindle though so your settings will be different. For the spoil board, I got a cheap 1 1/2" cutter (~$25) from Amazon that works fine. You might want to order a few sets of the cutters just to have on hand. They are cheap enough!

The Amana 2248 90deg V bit with replaceable cutters is my favorite bit in the drawer. It makes the smoothest cuts of any I've tried.

I recently made some dulcimers and needed a fret slotting bit. Didn't want to pay $40 for a single bit that I might break on the first pass, so I got a cheap set of 10 from Amazon for about $8. They worked out great, and only broke 2 on 6 fret boards (18 frets each).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,947 Posts
Onefinity and Tracking Costs

I thought it would be interesting to track the real cost of CNC and see if/when I can find my own "break even". The TLDR (Too long didn't read) is that I'm at $4726 in costs at this point.

For me, break even is the point when the projects pay for the cost of the hardware and material to get there. It is probably not a fair assessment as i'm not profiting, but for me this is a hobby and its just a way to track for fun. Also, there are a lot more costs to factor into a CNC than I was expecting and more than one late game surprise, so I hope this helps someone realize additional items to take into account when they budget.

My decision on onefinity really came down to - Near enough to my budget and, from what I can tell, its likely to be the most stable for maintaining accuracy in the price range due to the drive system.

I have one stall of a garage that sort of expands into the rest of the garage as I need it, so one of my desires was something that could either serve dual-duty (tabletop and cnc) or fold out of the way. I ended up going the folding route/

My first order was the onefinity system. I kind of went all in due to the folding ability. I'm a little worried about the lack of stability in the base, but it was a tradeoff I needed to make for storage.

$2329 - Onefinity Woodworker X50
$378 - Woodworker QCW - Secure from beneath ( I selected beneath because its folding so easy access and less machining of the wasteboard required
$368 - Folding leg kit
$93 - 3 axis Touch Probe - Ordered this a bit in ignorance. I am learning that maybe any probe can work, but I am not certain
$67 - Suckit Dust boot - I want to start out with dust control as part of my overall maintenance plan. Reviews on this are a bit mixed (sounds like it has risk of breaking) but I'll see about making my own later on.

Two items are missing from this that they typically sell with the system
1) Monitor - Reviews of the 7" that they sell with the system aren't good. The onefinity forum helped me identify what to look for in a monitor and I went with
$199- Gstory touch screen. I have an extra monitor and keyboard, but all reviews say that the touch screen is a must.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B09G6CLPT2/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
- I'm going to have to have a future post on how I mount the monitor, i have no clue until I see how the system folds up.

2) Joystick - I have an extra corded xbox controller. I plan to see if that works first.

$3905 - Total order for the base machine

That doesn't quite get us all the way. Still missing - Router, Bits, Spoil Board, Clamps, cable management, vacuum management.
$121 - Makita RT1701 is the universally agreed non-spindle solution.
$60 - Sheet of MDF 4×8'. I plan to use this for the spoil board as well as some initial test projects

$4086 - New total cost

I started with some general advice on bits along with looking at some of the operations I knew I would want.
My goals
1) Slab Flattening
2) Guitar specific (Long bits and very fine fret bit
3) general cutting - 1/4, 1/8
4) Inlay bit - small angle vbit
5) sign wording - Large angle vbit

With amana and Whiteside bits having libraries you can just pull in to Fusion 360, I opted to go for those, even though they were a little more pricey than generic

1) Slab Flattening - I liked the replaceable cutters and size on this
$140 - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00O4TEBT4/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
2) Guitar Specific
$43 - Fret slot sized - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08TV2H6GJ/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
$63 - Deep cut https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07GBFXPF1/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
3) General Cutting
$80 of 1/8, 1/16, 1/32 from https://www.ebay.com/usr/drillman1?_trksid=p2047675.m3561.l2559
$60 - Tapered Ball - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07413K89F/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&th=1
$31 - 1/4 down cut https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B072J4CPQT/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&th=1

4) inlay bit - $30 spectool vbit from amazon - I went cheaper here because I expect to mess up and break this.

5) Sign wording -
$30 - 90 degree replaceable cutter https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003DCMDRU/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&th=1

Total Bits - $477

$4563 - New total cost

I'm using the 3d printer to get to the cable management in my wait-period. I am using
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4619804
for the majority of it
With three pieces from here for the woodworker
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4996178

I'm using up old filament, but for the sake of costs, lets call it
$30 Filament
$24 - Aluminum L channel
$36 - Drag Chain - The forums seem to suggest its not worth the cost/effort/quality to print your own drag chain.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07WQ8P3PZ/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
$30 - Longer cables from Etsy that I believe are required with the cable runs.
https://www.etsy.com/listing/978088944/onefinity-cnc-drag-chain-extended-wires?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=onefinity+cable&ref=sr_gallery-1-1&sts=1&organic_search_click=1&variation0=2164077242
$4683 - New total Cost

Ooops - Forgot that I purchased a Makita 1/8" collet for some of the generic bits
$43

$4726 - Running Tally. My original expectation was $3500ish to get started, yikes.

I'm starting to look at hardware required to make my own clamps. I'll add that price in a future post.
I'm also going to 3d print (once I understand what makes sense with my folding system) a dust boom arm, probe storage, wrench storage, router switch protection, who knows what more.
You've already talked me out of buying a CNC machine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Onefinity and Tracking Costs

I thought it would be interesting to track the real cost of CNC and see if/when I can find my own "break even". The TLDR (Too long didn't read) is that I'm at $4726 in costs at this point.

For me, break even is the point when the projects pay for the cost of the hardware and material to get there. It is probably not a fair assessment as i'm not profiting, but for me this is a hobby and its just a way to track for fun. Also, there are a lot more costs to factor into a CNC than I was expecting and more than one late game surprise, so I hope this helps someone realize additional items to take into account when they budget.

My decision on onefinity really came down to - Near enough to my budget and, from what I can tell, its likely to be the most stable for maintaining accuracy in the price range due to the drive system.

I have one stall of a garage that sort of expands into the rest of the garage as I need it, so one of my desires was something that could either serve dual-duty (tabletop and cnc) or fold out of the way. I ended up going the folding route/

My first order was the onefinity system. I kind of went all in due to the folding ability. I'm a little worried about the lack of stability in the base, but it was a tradeoff I needed to make for storage.

$2329 - Onefinity Woodworker X50
$378 - Woodworker QCW - Secure from beneath ( I selected beneath because its folding so easy access and less machining of the wasteboard required
$368 - Folding leg kit
$93 - 3 axis Touch Probe - Ordered this a bit in ignorance. I am learning that maybe any probe can work, but I am not certain
$67 - Suckit Dust boot - I want to start out with dust control as part of my overall maintenance plan. Reviews on this are a bit mixed (sounds like it has risk of breaking) but I'll see about making my own later on.

Two items are missing from this that they typically sell with the system
1) Monitor - Reviews of the 7" that they sell with the system aren't good. The onefinity forum helped me identify what to look for in a monitor and I went with
$199- Gstory touch screen. I have an extra monitor and keyboard, but all reviews say that the touch screen is a must.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B09G6CLPT2/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
- I'm going to have to have a future post on how I mount the monitor, i have no clue until I see how the system folds up.

2) Joystick - I have an extra corded xbox controller. I plan to see if that works first.

$3905 - Total order for the base machine

That doesn't quite get us all the way. Still missing - Router, Bits, Spoil Board, Clamps, cable management, vacuum management.
$121 - Makita RT1701 is the universally agreed non-spindle solution.
$60 - Sheet of MDF 4×8'. I plan to use this for the spoil board as well as some initial test projects

$4086 - New total cost

I started with some general advice on bits along with looking at some of the operations I knew I would want.
My goals
1) Slab Flattening
2) Guitar specific (Long bits and very fine fret bit
3) general cutting - 1/4, 1/8
4) Inlay bit - small angle vbit
5) sign wording - Large angle vbit

With amana and Whiteside bits having libraries you can just pull in to Fusion 360, I opted to go for those, even though they were a little more pricey than generic

1) Slab Flattening - I liked the replaceable cutters and size on this
$140 - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00O4TEBT4/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
2) Guitar Specific
$43 - Fret slot sized - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08TV2H6GJ/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
$63 - Deep cut https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07GBFXPF1/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
3) General Cutting
$80 of 1/8, 1/16, 1/32 from https://www.ebay.com/usr/drillman1?_trksid=p2047675.m3561.l2559
$60 - Tapered Ball - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07413K89F/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&th=1
$31 - 1/4 down cut https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B072J4CPQT/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&th=1

4) inlay bit - $30 spectool vbit from amazon - I went cheaper here because I expect to mess up and break this.

5) Sign wording -
$30 - 90 degree replaceable cutter https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003DCMDRU/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&th=1

Total Bits - $477

$4563 - New total cost

I'm using the 3d printer to get to the cable management in my wait-period. I am using
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4619804
for the majority of it
With three pieces from here for the woodworker
https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4996178

I'm using up old filament, but for the sake of costs, lets call it
$30 Filament
$24 - Aluminum L channel
$36 - Drag Chain - The forums seem to suggest its not worth the cost/effort/quality to print your own drag chain.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07WQ8P3PZ/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
$30 - Longer cables from Etsy that I believe are required with the cable runs.
https://www.etsy.com/listing/978088944/onefinity-cnc-drag-chain-extended-wires?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=onefinity+cable&ref=sr_gallery-1-1&sts=1&organic_search_click=1&variation0=2164077242
$4683 - New total Cost

Ooops - Forgot that I purchased a Makita 1/8" collet for some of the generic bits
$43

$4726 - Running Tally. My original expectation was $3500ish to get started, yikes.

I'm starting to look at hardware required to make my own clamps. I'll add that price in a future post.
I'm also going to 3d print (once I understand what makes sense with my folding system) a dust boom arm, probe storage, wrench storage, router switch protection, who knows what more.
Joe,

Do you have a link to the amazon fret bits? I would love to try them as I have the same fear about breaking the expensive one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Makita Switch Cover

In between some meetings, I had some fun following my whim through a design iteration for a different style of switch guard.

I started from this https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:4939138

It was too short and flimsy, so I took it into fusion and played around with it. It felt like it would end up a total pain to adjust speed with it glued on.

I busted out the trusty calipers and snagged some images of the switch and opened fusion. 9 steps later and I think I have something I like.

Grippy enough that I think it will handle vibrations (Dab of glue should hold otherwise. And flimsy enough that I can quickly flip it out of the way for adjustments.
Gadget Gas Audio equipment Communication Device Machine


Iterations
Light Automotive design Wood Lighting Gesture

Body jewelry Material property Font Jewellery Metal
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
It's a Button!

Skipping past initial CNC setup, might come back and post on that later.

I have been slow on the startup, trying to take baby steps as I get set up. I finally was ready for my first non spoilboard or slab flatening. I got myself a model and created 3 operations

Rough cut
Ball nose smoothing
Outside contour.
Lessons

Wow, that ball nose can get you near finish sanding. I'm sure I can trade off speed later on but it impressed me
When you are on the last operation, on your first project, and the screen tells you 16 seconds to complete a .75" deep plunge contour cut. Stop and think if that makes sense. Instead of, like me, proudly hitting go and stepping back to watch
I love it already, having a lot of fun. Hope you found a little joy in my first project and first OOPS.

This was a first prototype of a gift for my mother who once said "it would sure be neat if they made coasters that looked like buttons".

Blue Wood Gas Tints and shades Engineering


Later, I went back, updated the model and setup for a 2 sided cut with a flip in the middle. This let me add in a cork coaster.

Food Ingredient Wood Button Recipe


Eye Circle Pattern Soil Fashion accessory


I now have an order for 12 for all of her friends! :)
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Stanley Liberty Bell Jack Plane

This project was a blast, and for me let me see some of the capability of modern tools.

Final Shot First:
Hand tool Wood Musical instrument Shoulder plane Tool


My father gifted me a garage sale find of an old Stanley Plane that had seen better days

Wood Hand tool Safety glove Tool Glove


Wood Metal Tool Gas Household hardware


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Plywood Gas


Step one was to learn about Rust Removal:
Electrical wiring Gas Audio equipment Wire Cable


Next up, was some modeling with Fusion to see if I could successfully recreate the plane body.
Rectangle Schematic Font Parallel Slope


I printed out some thin slices to verify my measurements. Turns out they weren't right and it was a worthwhile exercise. A few adjustments and I had a model.

Wood Automotive exterior Wood stain Hardwood Bumper


I used a very precise tool of taped together strips of paper to calculate my angles.
Wood Flooring Floor Automotive design Hardwood


I had a knotty piece of walnut that had nice grain and was near to my dimensions. As well I had some leftover powder coat that I decided to use. I filled the knot with epoxy and the powder coat to end up with a matching plane.

The plane body on the CNC was just 4 operations and took about 2 hours total. This included a mistake that shoved my stock out of place and nicked the back end. This was a great lesson on how annoying it is to try to re-align a half done project. It ended up slightly narrower because of this, but no big issue.
Building Wood Fixture Window Building material

Wood Tableware Rectangle Font Metal


The Handle modeling was more difficult, because I wanted to get the long bolt angle correct and I would need to set it up with reference pins so that I could flip and complete a 2 sided cut. I over-reacted a bit and this took about 5 hours to complete. Luckily I needed to spend some time cleaning all the metal bits and prepping for paint.

Handheld power drill Gas Tints and shades Wood Machine


This is when I came up with the idea I am most proud of. I was very worried about how I would drill the correct angle through the handle. since I had created the model myself, I added another model that would mate to the cut handle and act like a bit-guide. I used my 3D printer to create this drill guide. While it looks silly, it worked flawlessly.
Rectangle Wood Slope Parallel Font


Guitar accessory Wood Musical instrument Automotive design Guitar


What impressed me the most was that the fit was so perfect, I even had a positive click as it locked into place.
Wood Interior design Floor Wood stain Material property


I didn't take any pictures but somewhere in here I turned the handle on the lathe, sharpened up the blade, and powder coated the metal bits with my trusty harbor freight machine.

The nice clean shavings were super satisfying from this project.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,533 Posts
Stanley Liberty Bell Jack Plane

This project was a blast, and for me let me see some of the capability of modern tools.

Final Shot First:
Hand tool Wood Musical instrument Shoulder plane Tool


My father gifted me a garage sale find of an old Stanley Plane that had seen better days

Wood Hand tool Safety glove Tool Glove


Wood Metal Tool Gas Household hardware


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Plywood Gas


Step one was to learn about Rust Removal:
Electrical wiring Gas Audio equipment Wire Cable


Next up, was some modeling with Fusion to see if I could successfully recreate the plane body.
Rectangle Schematic Font Parallel Slope


I printed out some thin slices to verify my measurements. Turns out they weren't right and it was a worthwhile exercise. A few adjustments and I had a model.

Wood Automotive exterior Wood stain Hardwood Bumper


I used a very precise tool of taped together strips of paper to calculate my angles.
Wood Flooring Floor Automotive design Hardwood


I had a knotty piece of walnut that had nice grain and was near to my dimensions. As well I had some leftover powder coat that I decided to use. I filled the knot with epoxy and the powder coat to end up with a matching plane.

The plane body on the CNC was just 4 operations and took about 2 hours total. This included a mistake that shoved my stock out of place and nicked the back end. This was a great lesson on how annoying it is to try to re-align a half done project. It ended up slightly narrower because of this, but no big issue.
Building Wood Fixture Window Building material

Wood Tableware Rectangle Font Metal


The Handle modeling was more difficult, because I wanted to get the long bolt angle correct and I would need to set it up with reference pins so that I could flip and complete a 2 sided cut. I over-reacted a bit and this took about 5 hours to complete. Luckily I needed to spend some time cleaning all the metal bits and prepping for paint.

Handheld power drill Gas Tints and shades Wood Machine


This is when I came up with the idea I am most proud of. I was very worried about how I would drill the correct angle through the handle. since I had created the model myself, I added another model that would mate to the cut handle and act like a bit-guide. I used my 3D printer to create this drill guide. While it looks silly, it worked flawlessly.
Rectangle Wood Slope Parallel Font


Guitar accessory Wood Musical instrument Automotive design Guitar


What impressed me the most was that the fit was so perfect, I even had a positive click as it locked into place.
Wood Interior design Floor Wood stain Material property


I didn't take any pictures but somewhere in here I turned the handle on the lathe, sharpened up the blade, and powder coated the metal bits with my trusty harbor freight machine.

The nice clean shavings were super satisfying from this project.
Yup, the old Stanley Liberty Bell planes. I've got the complete set by designation. I don't know why there isn't more of a following for these, but they do have their limitations. They came in #104 and #105 iron bodies, and #122, 127, 129 and #132 sizes

Here's a pic of my #132. I made a purple tote and knob from resin casting for this bad boy.

Wood Flooring Floor Hardwood Wood stain


Like ships passing in the night. Enjoy your Liberty plane!!
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,799 Posts
Stanley Liberty Bell Jack Plane

This project was a blast, and for me let me see some of the capability of modern tools.

Final Shot First:
Hand tool Wood Musical instrument Shoulder plane Tool


My father gifted me a garage sale find of an old Stanley Plane that had seen better days

Wood Hand tool Safety glove Tool Glove


Wood Metal Tool Gas Household hardware


Wood Wood stain Hardwood Plywood Gas


Step one was to learn about Rust Removal:
Electrical wiring Gas Audio equipment Wire Cable


Next up, was some modeling with Fusion to see if I could successfully recreate the plane body.
Rectangle Schematic Font Parallel Slope


I printed out some thin slices to verify my measurements. Turns out they weren't right and it was a worthwhile exercise. A few adjustments and I had a model.

Wood Automotive exterior Wood stain Hardwood Bumper


I used a very precise tool of taped together strips of paper to calculate my angles.
Wood Flooring Floor Automotive design Hardwood


I had a knotty piece of walnut that had nice grain and was near to my dimensions. As well I had some leftover powder coat that I decided to use. I filled the knot with epoxy and the powder coat to end up with a matching plane.

The plane body on the CNC was just 4 operations and took about 2 hours total. This included a mistake that shoved my stock out of place and nicked the back end. This was a great lesson on how annoying it is to try to re-align a half done project. It ended up slightly narrower because of this, but no big issue.
Building Wood Fixture Window Building material

Wood Tableware Rectangle Font Metal


The Handle modeling was more difficult, because I wanted to get the long bolt angle correct and I would need to set it up with reference pins so that I could flip and complete a 2 sided cut. I over-reacted a bit and this took about 5 hours to complete. Luckily I needed to spend some time cleaning all the metal bits and prepping for paint.

Handheld power drill Gas Tints and shades Wood Machine


This is when I came up with the idea I am most proud of. I was very worried about how I would drill the correct angle through the handle. since I had created the model myself, I added another model that would mate to the cut handle and act like a bit-guide. I used my 3D printer to create this drill guide. While it looks silly, it worked flawlessly.
Rectangle Wood Slope Parallel Font


Guitar accessory Wood Musical instrument Automotive design Guitar


What impressed me the most was that the fit was so perfect, I even had a positive click as it locked into place.
Wood Interior design Floor Wood stain Material property


I didn't take any pictures but somewhere in here I turned the handle on the lathe, sharpened up the blade, and powder coated the metal bits with my trusty harbor freight machine.

The nice clean shavings were super satisfying from this project.
Interesting post and well done !
 

Attachments

1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top