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I have purchased a used JET 14" Bandsaw. Got it home and on it's new mobile base. When I bought it, I knew right away that the table was going to need to be 'cleaned up'. The previous owner didn't take care of it at all. Nothing really bad, just not at all what is needed.

Need some suggestions about the best course of action to take.

Sanding, cleaning, etc. This is my first really decent tool, and an area (cleaning up the table) that I just don't have experience with. Appreciate the info and help that I know I'm going to get.
 

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If its rusty remove the table and soak it upside down in some evaporust for a day or so. This will remove the rust but not stains.

Its going to be alot more work if its just stains and you want a nice shiny table. I've used scotch brite pads and bar keepers friend with good results. To make it go a little faster, I have an old palm sander that I attach the scotch brite to.
 

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I have had good luck with the two products shown here:

Liquid Cabinetry Fluid Automotive tire Paint


Use the Boeshield Rust Free product to clean up any rust and stains (using either steel wool or a Scotchbrite pad as LJD4662 recommends), then give it regular treatments of GlideCote to keep the surface clean and slick.

You can find both products online at Amazon or many of the suppliers for woodworking gear.

Hope this helps.

Ron
 

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Someone else mentioned recently in a different thread that the active ingredient in Boeshield Rust Free is phosphoric acid, which is much cheaper on its own and apparently works just as well.

Be careful using Rust-Free on shiny cast iron; I used it on some light surface rust on my new table saw for no more than the prescribed amount of time and it ate away the shine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Cleanup went fairly well. Used Bar Keepers Helper, steel wool and a 'sanding block'. Sanding block was to apply even pressure on the steel wool. It's not 'perfect', but very clean. Picked up some wax, and will put that on later today.

On another note, laid out the new bearings (the other guy bought them, never installed or used them), and started inspecting the details of the saw a little further. Took off the blade (already have new ones) and unfortunately both of the rubber tires are really completely embedded with metal shavings. He was cross cutting metal 'brackets' for something his wife was doing in her curtain business. Little chance to 'clean these up', so simply ordered two new urethane tires. Be here in a few days.

Thanks again, for the information and replies.
 

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I have the same bandsaw, bought used. I hit it with Evaporust overnight, in a trash bag in a cardboard box. Worked great!
 

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I play with granite a little bit. In addition to a tile saw and a circular saw, I used a variable speed grinder.

Of course, the saws are to cut the granite. The grinder acts as a granite router and a polisher. Because you can slow it down, you can use diamond router bits, grind stones and backing plates with [hook-and-loop] disks to shape and polish the edges.

I've used some of my worn diamond polishing disks (600 and up) with oil to polish the top of my machined tables. When done, I had a mirror finish.

After the top was polished, I applied Corrosion X [DO NOT GET THE INDUSTRIAL VERSION - it does not harden]. It destroyed the polished finish, but you could set a coffee cup or a pop can on the cast surface and not leave a rust mark. The last application lasted well over a year.
 

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My approach for taking off rust and general clean up, is to use automotive rubbing compound using a random orbital sander with a scotch pad under it and then a rag under the ROS to remove the excess and then apply automotive wax with a soft rag under my ROS ,when through metal tops have a slick clean, mirror like surface.
 
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