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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Grid pattern #1





Found a cool trick to help with the dry air of winter carving. I've been placing a piece of dampened paper towel around the wood blank an hour or two before I carve. When I first did it, I just put it on one side, which lead to some weird warping, but when the blank re-dried it was flat again (whew).

This pattern relies almost entirely on the basic triangle cuts, so it's good for practice. I used a simple flower motif in the center, it can be left blank or used for something more creative. :)
 

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Grid pattern #1





Found a cool trick to help with the dry air of winter carving. I've been placing a piece of dampened paper towel around the wood blank an hour or two before I carve. When I first did it, I just put it on one side, which lead to some weird warping, but when the blank re-dried it was flat again (whew).

This pattern relies almost entirely on the basic triangle cuts, so it's good for practice. I used a simple flower motif in the center, it can be left blank or used for something more creative. :)
Good work posting these chip carving patterns!
I like that you kept them basic so someone fairly new to chip carving can find success.
If you'd like to share them with me, I can share them with my members.

I recognize your handle. Are you a My Chip Carving member?

Marty
www.MyChipCarving.com
866-444-6996
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Grid pattern #1





Found a cool trick to help with the dry air of winter carving. I've been placing a piece of dampened paper towel around the wood blank an hour or two before I carve. When I first did it, I just put it on one side, which lead to some weird warping, but when the blank re-dried it was flat again (whew).

This pattern relies almost entirely on the basic triangle cuts, so it's good for practice. I used a simple flower motif in the center, it can be left blank or used for something more creative. :)
Sure Marty, feel free to share them!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Wheat 1

Perhaps a good design for coasters that will hold those beer bottles! Keeping the knife in a near vertical position where the stems cross over will help to keep tear out to a minimum.

 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Fans 1



I based this on the form used in a cross pattern from myChipCarving.com
My pleasure - enjoy! I use basswood for most of my exercises. Butternut also works well to get started. 1/4 - 3/8" of an inch thick is good for the coasters, I cut them to 3 1/2" wide and about 18" long, and carve them before cutting them apart. (Just seems easier for me that way)
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Leaf 1

Time to start with some curves - I've created a pattern that's based on an article that Wayne Barton published about designing your own leaf patterns. I did a simple leaf, and just reflected it around the boundary. I put in a tulip pattern in the center, but feel free to fill the center with a design of your own.



 
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